young people – David Hemmings Bird Photography http://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/ Mon, 07 Mar 2022 06:11:41 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-2021-06-25T155134.587.png young people – David Hemmings Bird Photography http://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/ 32 32 Legendary photographer Brian Griffin returns to his Dudley roots to support cultural projects https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/legendary-photographer-brian-griffin-returns-to-his-dudley-roots-to-support-cultural-projects/ Mon, 07 Mar 2022 06:01:00 +0000 https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/legendary-photographer-brian-griffin-returns-to-his-dudley-roots-to-support-cultural-projects/ Photographer Brian Griffin with radio presenter Frank Chamberlain and some of the album covers he shot Brian, now 73, grew up in Lye, Dudley, and has photographed countless artists including REM, Iggy Pop, Ringo Star and Peter Gabriel. His work appeared on many album covers of the time, including that of Depeche Mode’s Some Great […]]]>
Photographer Brian Griffin with radio presenter Frank Chamberlain and some of the album covers he shot

Brian, now 73, grew up in Lye, Dudley, and has photographed countless artists including REM, Iggy Pop, Ringo Star and Peter Gabriel.

His work appeared on many album covers of the time, including that of Depeche Mode’s Some Great Reward, which was taken at Round Oak Steelworks in Brierley Hill just after it closed.

Frank Chamberlain, Cultural Consortium project coordinator and radio host at Black Country Radio, works on cultural projects and called Brian to ask him to get involved.

Legendary photographer Brian Griffin

Frank said: “At Brierley Hill we worked on the ‘Hi! Street Music Commission”.

“It’s about bringing people to the main street and showing their art.

“We have worked with different groups to bring culture to the main street.

“We have been working on a music project that brings professionals to Brierley Hill to work with young people to create music for an album and images to go with it.

“I phoned Brian to ask him to get involved and he’s all for it.”

During his visit, Brian recorded a show for Black Country Radio Xtra which will be released at noon on March 22.

He then participated in a question-and-answer session with music students from Resonance College.

Frank added: “Today was all about raising awareness of how a child from Lye can become a world famous photographer.

“We hope he will help us with the cover of the album that the young people will create during the project this summer.”

Brian has also donated signed artwork to be auctioned off for Brierley Hill Babybank, which provides support to underprivileged families with young children.

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U.S. Embassy and Doha Women Forum to Host Workshop on “Empowerment Through Music” https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/u-s-embassy-and-doha-women-forum-to-host-workshop-on-empowerment-through-music/ Mon, 28 Feb 2022 07:03:00 +0000 https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/u-s-embassy-and-doha-women-forum-to-host-workshop-on-empowerment-through-music/ Doha: Critically acclaimed artist and songwriter Maya Azucena will lead an empowering workshop, “Unleash Your Power Through Music”, at Centara West Bay Residences & Suites. The workshop will feature songs and storytelling, demonstrating the power of music in transforming our lives. The workshop, organized by the Doha Women Forum, in collaboration with the US Embassy […]]]>

Doha: Critically acclaimed artist and songwriter Maya Azucena will lead an empowering workshop, “Unleash Your Power Through Music”, at Centara West Bay Residences & Suites.

The workshop will feature songs and storytelling, demonstrating the power of music in transforming our lives. The workshop, organized by the Doha Women Forum, in collaboration with the US Embassy in Qatar, will take place on Wednesday, March 2 at 6 p.m. It is one of the many initiatives of the Doha Women Forum to promote the health and well-being of women and young people in Qatar.

American artist Maya Azucena fuses indie-pop and contemporary rhythm and blues (R&B), along with passionate blues-inspired vocals, to create music that uplifts the soul. Azucena is well known for her humanitarian vision and global projects. Based on a personal commitment to having a positive impact on society through his talent, most of Azucena’s songs are anthems that give voice to self-esteem, the empowerment of women and young people, the overcome obstacles and step into our fearless selves.

Natalie A Baker, Chargé d’Affaires at the U.S. Embassy in Qatar, said, “We are thrilled to welcome Maya Azucena to the Middle East for the first time and to work with local grassroots movements to light women in music and empowerment. This workshop with the Doha Women Forum allows everyone to find common ground through music, storytelling and self-expression.

Doha Women Forum Founder Conchita Ponce said, “It is a great pleasure to be able to organize a workshop that aims to transform our lives and increase our self-esteem using music. Maya Azucena is a wonderful performer who aims to empower women and young people by focusing on finding and expressing their voice.

Azucena said she was looking forward to visiting Qatar for the first time and helping attendees discover their superpower. Rivage Qatar representative, Linda Vorkale, said, “The Rivage Qatar team is delighted to support the upcoming workshop on music as a means of bringing about positive change and impacting society.

The Maya Azucena tour is organized by the United States Embassy in Qatar and the workshop is sponsored by Centara West Bay Residences & Suites and Rivage Skincare – Natural Dead Sea Minerals.

Registration for Unleash Your Power Through Music with Maya Azucena is available through Eventbrite.

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New workshop to teach teens about gun safety in West Louisville | News https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/new-workshop-to-teach-teens-about-gun-safety-in-west-louisville-news/ Mon, 21 Feb 2022 01:25:00 +0000 https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/new-workshop-to-teach-teens-about-gun-safety-in-west-louisville-news/ LOUISVILLE, Ky. (WDRB) — A longtime firearms instructor will be to prove gun safety, gun handling, and other skills to children and teens in West Louisville during a youth safety workshop. “Young people are typically left out of the conversation when it comes to firearms training,” said Aaron McGahee. It’s just another big reason the […]]]>

LOUISVILLE, Ky. (WDRB) — A longtime firearms instructor will be to prove gun safety, gun handling, and other skills to children and teens in West Louisville during a youth safety workshop.

“Young people are typically left out of the conversation when it comes to firearms training,” said Aaron McGahee.

It’s just another big reason the military veterinarian decided to expand its firearms training academy – Rhinox Research group.

“We’re going more aggressive and deeper into West Louisville,” McGahee noted.

This youth atelier is in collaboration with Cole’s Place Events, a place This is no stranger to gun violence. After a deadly double shooting in the event space last summer, the owner closed the establishment.

“Cole is my barber, so we always talk about what we can do to improve life and improve quality in West Louisville,” said McGahee, who believes the improvement also comes down to affordability.

This is why he did a workshop tickets for $35.

“We can’t do everything, but with our strengths we can do something,” said McGahee.

While parents are encouraged to to participate, the child must have a guardian present at the event.

“Our students can practice with the handgun before going to the shooting range,” said McGahee. “Tthis allows them to train comfortably and practice these fundamental skills during class.

The youth safety workshop is February 26 from 1 to 5 p.m. at Cole’s Place on West Kentucky Street.

Copyright 2022 WDRB Media. All rights reserved.

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UMaine 4-H workshop explores swamps, climate change https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/umaine-4-h-workshop-explores-swamps-climate-change/ Mon, 14 Feb 2022 05:00:12 +0000 https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/umaine-4-h-workshop-explores-swamps-climate-change/ An online workshop for young people aged 12-18 on marshes and climate change is scheduled from 1:30-2:45 p.m. on Wednesday, February 23. The workshop will be offered by the University of Maine Cooperative Extension 4-H at Orono. Courtesy of UMaine Cooperative Extension ORONO – The University of Maine 4-H Cooperative Extension plans to offer an […]]]>

An online workshop for young people aged 12-18 on marshes and climate change is scheduled from 1:30-2:45 p.m. on Wednesday, February 23. The workshop will be offered by the University of Maine Cooperative Extension 4-H at Orono. Courtesy of UMaine Cooperative Extension

ORONO – The University of Maine 4-H Cooperative Extension plans to offer an online workshop for youth ages 12-18 on marshes and climate change from 1:30-2:45 p.m. on Wednesday, February 23.

“Maine’s Mystery Marshes: Using Electronic DNA to Understand Climate Change” will explore Maine’s salt marshes and their environmental DNA to understand the role of habitat amid climate change. Hands-on games and demonstrations will give attendees an in-depth view of the science of eDNA and salt marsh ecology, according to a press release from the expansion.

UMaine graduate student Heather Richard will lead the workshop. This workshop is supported by Maine EPSCoR at UMaine.

The workshop is free; attendance is limited to 15. Mandatory registration ends Friday, February 11.

To register to receive the link and documents at home, visit extension.umaine.edu.

For more information or to request a reasonable accommodation, contact 207-581-8206 or [email protected].

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Vedale Hill, a local artist, is among the winners of Milwaukee Magazine’s 2022 Unity Awards | WUWM 89.7 FM https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/vedale-hill-a-local-artist-is-among-the-winners-of-milwaukee-magazines-2022-unity-awards-wuwm-89-7-fm/ Wed, 09 Feb 2022 21:45:00 +0000 https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/vedale-hill-a-local-artist-is-among-the-winners-of-milwaukee-magazines-2022-unity-awards-wuwm-89-7-fm/ This month, Milwaukee Magazine features the winners of their 2022 Unity Awards, spotlighting the people and organizations that make Milwaukee a better place. One of the featured people is Milwaukee-based artist Vedale Hill. You may have seen his Black Lives Matter mural at the intersection of West Locust Street and North Martin Luther King Junior […]]]>

This month, Milwaukee Magazine features the winners of their 2022 Unity Awards, spotlighting the people and organizations that make Milwaukee a better place.

One of the featured people is Milwaukee-based artist Vedale Hill. You may have seen his Black Lives Matter mural at the intersection of West Locust Street and North Martin Luther King Junior Drive. He also worked with students and SHARP Literacy to create the “Helping Hands” mural at North Martin Luther King Junior Drive and West Garfield Avenue.

In addition to community art, Hill focuses on improving Milwaukee’s Bronzeville neighborhood. He and his brother founded Jazale’s Art Studio, a community-based non-profit art education studio for young people. He also co-founded HomeWorks Bronzeville, a cultural development project that uses the arts to sustainably renew the community of artists and current residents.

Growing up, Hill saw art as a way to support herself financially. “I consider my early days the best of the worst. We didn’t have the best systems in the schools,” Hill says. “My journey began out of necessity. I was fine with [art]. I love doing it, but I took it seriously once I started to realize it could help me financially.”

Hill names his handyman Uncle Richard and his college drawing and painting teacher for influencing his work. But the main motivation for taking her job seriously comes from her daughter, Jazale.

Hill beams, “My daughter, her birth, really pushed me to take it seriously when it came to career pathing. When it came to how I wanted to be seen, how I wanted to be absorbed into this world, it would be through her eyes. I didn’t want to make huge mistakes, but I wanted to be honest.

While Hill has an art background from MIAD, Hill notes that he has a “street education” which helps him in his work with the community. For him, growing up in Bronzeville and understanding the turmoil of his community is important to understand the problems encountered on a daily basis.

He recognizes that many young men like him in the community are struggling. Hill says they need to know that the options to become an artist are tangible and possible. “I stick to my community first because we are often seen as last in resource laws. We are in food deserts. Education has deteriorated over the years. And that’s where I’m leading. So that’s where I’m going to go,” Hill says.

It was because of this need for space that he and his brother decided to found Jazale’s in 2012. Hill was already doing commissions and contracts for the Boys & Girls Club and the YMCA. While working in these organizations, he found that the money invested in the programs was not delivering quality lessons. Often the programs were meant to fill an important need in arts education. Instead, he often saw nearly entire school population budgets earmarked for a few classrooms.

Vedale Hill and his brother knew they could interact more effectively with the community. “We started writing our own grants, creating our own programs, reaching out to these families on our own,” says Hill. The two made it a priority never to take funds that would mean quantity over quality.

Working in the community he grew up in was amazing and challenging, Hill says. For example, seeing his community ignore problems or being ignored, he has seen young people die or go to jail. Moreover, he has seen countless spaces crumble after he and his team have taken over – not only have they crumbled physically, but energy and momentum as well.

Hill adds that it was devastating for children who fall in love with the program to see it suddenly out of reach of transportation. “We had no say in how long [students] could be [at work spaces] if we owned nothing,” Hill says.

Because of this need, Hill helped fund HomeWorks Bronzeville. “So we started to look at home ownership and workspace as a way to create a platform for young artists to not only thrive as individuals, but also to create a community. long-term,” says Hill.

Hill says he wouldn’t change anything about what got him to where he is now, and although he’s never seen himself teaching in a classroom, he loves the work he does. “Hopefully in 100, 200, 500 years they read about Vedale Hill. And they use not only my art but also my life as something that should be viewed in a positive light. I absolutely didn’t see that I was going to be who I am, but I love it,” Hill says.

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University of Aberdeen now offers therapeutic photography course https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/university-of-aberdeen-now-offers-therapeutic-photography-course/ Fri, 04 Feb 2022 07:51:43 +0000 https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/university-of-aberdeen-now-offers-therapeutic-photography-course/ A university in Aberdeen, Scotland, is now offering a one-of-a-kind course: an academic qualification on using photography to cope with loss. The postgraduate course is aimed at professionals who work with marginalized young people who wish to use photography in their therapeutic practice. The course leader, Dr. Neil Gibson, is a senior lecturer at Robert […]]]>

A university in Aberdeen, Scotland, is now offering a one-of-a-kind course: an academic qualification on using photography to cope with loss. The postgraduate course is aimed at professionals who work with marginalized young people who wish to use photography in their therapeutic practice.

The course leader, Dr. Neil Gibson, is a senior lecturer at Robert Gordon University, where the course is delivered. He has devoted years of research and his doctorate to therapeutic practices, and has written a book illustrating some of the ways photography can improve self-esteem, resilience and self-reliance.

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A workshop for the European Year of Youth aims to combat the negative effects of the pandemic https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/a-workshop-for-the-european-year-of-youth-aims-to-combat-the-negative-effects-of-the-pandemic/ Sun, 16 Jan 2022 06:34:18 +0000 https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/a-workshop-for-the-european-year-of-youth-aims-to-combat-the-negative-effects-of-the-pandemic/ Addressing the negative effects of the pandemic on young people was the main theme of the co-design workshop for the European Year of Youth 2022, organized on 14 January by the Office of the Citizens Commissioner, the national coordinator for the Year of Youth, at the PwC Cyprus Experience Center in Nicosia. The objective of […]]]>

Addressing the negative effects of the pandemic on young people was the main theme of the co-design workshop for the European Year of Youth 2022, organized on 14 January by the Office of the Citizens Commissioner, the national coordinator for the Year of Youth, at the PwC Cyprus Experience Center in Nicosia. The objective of the workshop was to ensure the necessary cooperation between the relevant government ministries and departments, as well as youth associations in Cyprus, in order to achieve the objectives of the European Year of Youth.

The workshop brought together Minister of Education, Culture, Sports and Youth, Prodromos Prodromou, Deputy Minister of Research, Innovation and Digital Policy Kyriakos Kokkinos and Deputy Minister of Welfare, Anastasia Anthousi. The workshop was also attended by Alexandra Attalidou on behalf of the House of Representatives, Permanent Secretaries and other officials from ministries and government departments, semi-governmental organizations, the Cyprus Youth Organization, the Delegation of the European Commission and the office of the European Parliament in Cyprus. , the Conference of Rectors of Cypriot Universities, as well as representatives of the Cyprus Youth Council and other youth associations.

The year 2022 has been designated by the European Union as the European Year of Youth, given the impact of the pandemic on young people. The main objective is to ensure access to opportunities for the young generation in the post-pandemic period, as well as to encourage the participation of young people in the democratic and social life of the Member States, in favor of a more digital Europe. and inclusive.

During his presentation, the Citizens Commissioner, Panayiotis Sentonas, spoke about the objectives of the National Plan for the Year of Youth, as well as their interconnection with the European youth objectives, which include, among others, equality gender, inclusive societies, mental health and well-being, securing employment for all, improving the quality of learning and the green and digital transition.

He added that “the European Year of Youth gives us the opportunity to focus on how to reopen perspectives and opportunities for the young generation in the post-pandemic period, through the green and digital transition and the implementation of the NextGenerationEU recovery plan”.

In his introductory speech, the Minister of Education, Culture, Sports and Youth, Prodromos Prodromou, stressed that young people need immediate support and empowerment: at all levels : local, national and European.

Minister Prodromou highlighted the new student evaluation plan, the new education and teacher evaluation plan, as well as the plan for a better match between higher and secondary education curricula .

The minister said that some of the above-mentioned reforms have been included to be supported in the recovery and resilience plan “Cyprus-Tomorrow”, while a number of actions are being implemented by other ministries with the support national and European funds.

Addressing the young people who took part in the workshop, Kyriakos Kokkinos, Deputy Minister of Research, Innovation and Digital Policy, explained that actions will be developed with the young people themselves. He added that these are “policy co-design actions and wide dissemination of the importance of digital transformation for a new model of development that our country so badly needs, which lays the foundations for a thriving and competitive economy and a prosperous and inclusive society”. company”.

He also mentioned the National Recovery and Resilience Plan, in which 282 million euros, in addition to 23% of the total investment, are dedicated to digital-focused actions, which aim to equip young people with the tools , knowledge and skills necessary for their personal, social and professional development.

In her remarks, Deputy Minister of Social Welfare Anastasia Anthousi spoke about the role of the Deputy Minister in achieving youth empowerment goals in the country, the most important of which is promoting strategies from childhood. The Deputy Ministry has created the National Action Plan in collaboration with all relevant departments, which will be submitted to the European Commission in March 2022.

The Deputy Minister added that the empowerment of young people in care is carried out in parallel through the institution of semi-autonomous living, the aim being to implement skills development programs in cooperation with organizations volunteers and other bodies such as local authorities, thus broadening the prospects for professional and social integration.

Anthousi also said the Deputy Ministry is investing through the Recovery and Resilience Plan in expanding the availability of affordable daycare for infants and children up to 3 years and 8 months of age.

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What photography trends should we say goodbye to in 2022 https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/what-photography-trends-should-we-say-goodbye-to-in-2022/ Sat, 01 Jan 2022 22:01:02 +0000 https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/what-photography-trends-should-we-say-goodbye-to-in-2022/ There are fashions that come into fashion that then become outdated and others that become overused clichés. Some of the things we do are just plain unethical. Here’s what’s slated to drop this year, and drone owners won’t be thrilled. Instagram style filters and predefined Lightroom equivalents are out Over the past decade, applying filters […]]]>


There are fashions that come into fashion that then become outdated and others that become overused clichés. Some of the things we do are just plain unethical. Here’s what’s slated to drop this year, and drone owners won’t be thrilled.

Instagram style filters and predefined Lightroom equivalents are out

Over the past decade, applying filters on Instagram and elsewhere has become a quick and easy way for photographers to change the look of their images. They were never high quality edits. Nonetheless, the look produced by these filters then became trending and, therefore, the bread and butter of Lightroom preset makers.

These filters and presets now look dated. This washed out, low-contrast look with blue tones was never going to be anything but a fad that would soon become as outdated as tank tops. Now, thank God, their end is in sight.

The sins of skin smoothing, body resizing, and skin whitening

There are also, of course, some filters that hurt self-esteem. These are still popular and, unfortunately, likely will remain so. It is time to abandon them for the common good.

Skin smoothing was a technique used by portrait photographers long before Instagram made the eyes of Systrom and Krieger shine. Even before the days of commercial digital photography, fashion photographers airbrushed the skin in the darkroom to give it a crisp plastic appearance. For decades, we’ve been aware of the negative mental health effects of these techniques – especially among young women – but they are still prevalent. The idea of ​​beauty is perverted by this parody of reality.

Of course, there are times when minor corrections of skin blemishes are appropriate. I removed an acne spot on a bridesmaid’s face while processing a wedding photoshoot. It went unnoticed by everyone except the bride, who thanked me for doing it. If I had left it, everyone would have remembered it forever.

Resizing and thinning the face and body is also a nefarious trend which, again, places unrealistic expectations on young people.

Even more damaging is skin lightening. It is well documented that in the 1950s, the great singer and jazz pianist Nat King Cole was forced to bleach his face with powder when he appeared on television. Even now cosmetic skin lightening and whitening is happening with huge adverse health effects. Despite growing condemnation, some photographers still use digital techniques to whiten the skin of people of color. It is time for this racism to be eradicated.

We need to get used to the natural appearance of the skin and celebrate bodies of all sizes, shapes and colors.

Ditch the exaggerated HDR

Is this still a thing? Unfortunately yes. While those gruesome, over-processed images from ten years ago seem to have mostly faded, they still appear in agony.

In some circumstances, HDR has its place. For real estate photography, interior details can be enhanced using the technique. Also, when you are shooting against the light and want to get the detail in shadow and not blow out the sunrise or sunset, it can also help. But, with advancements in sensor technology, the dynamic range of contemporary cameras is such that it is unnecessary to combine images from different exposures under most circumstances. In addition, standard dynamic range images look better than artificial and hyper-real HDR photos.

Stop vandalizing your images with watermarks

You spend hours planning and implementing the perfect shot, removing any unwanted distractions with careful framing. Then you pour over the raw file, adjusting it gently for the best results. Then you spoil that perfect photo watermarked with a distracting, wavy signature.

What is the purpose of this watermark? If it’s to announce who took the photo, then you’ve already done so by posting it to an account you own. Or are you doing it to prevent others from using the image? If so, it won’t work; just one stroke of the spot removal brush in the editing software will erase this as easily as a bridesmaid button. So is it a matter of proving ownership if someone plagiarizes the photo? As long as you have the raw file, your camera and lens serial numbers and other identifying information are embedded in the metadata. If someone is determined to use your photos illegally, then they will. You can find your stolen images with Google Image Search and Tin eye, then send them either a takedown notice or a big bill for using the image.

If you still want to do it, browse the collections of any great photographer. They don’t disfigure their images with signatures.

Faux Film Grain

The grain produced by high sensitivity film can look great. Crisp digital images are also fantastic. Adding grain that tries to mimic the look of the film creates a lie. It’s about transforming the digital artwork from something authentic and worthy of celebration into a poor imitation of film. In doing so, the photographer declares that the digital image is less dignified and the film is better. If so, then surely the photographer should shoot with a film camera.

Okay, so adding grain can hide a multitude of sins, including making blurry images sharper, especially after removing digital noise. But contemporary sensor technology and the outstanding noise reduction software that is now available, like On1 NoNoise, make this technique redundant.

Time to put the drones away

Drones come for a lot of bad press. When used correctly, they are a useful tool, an inexpensive way to obtain aerial photographs. For farmers inspecting their crops and building managers inspecting inaccessible roofs, they are ideal. However, the news reports highlight an endless number of incidents of privacy breaches, at endanger air travel, and cause damage to wildlife. Despite this, most drone users fly them responsibly.

From an artistic and creative point of view, they have become a gimmick and are being used unnecessarily. It seems like every TV show has annoying interference with unnecessary drone footage. They rarely add anything to the content of the program and hardly say more than, “Look at me, I have a drone”. In film production, cameras need to be used to make the shot immersive and the tools that create the images need not be obvious.

Event photography is also plagued by drones. Shunning Robert Capa’s advice on getting close to the subject and every wildlife photographer and portrait painter’s insistence on shooting at eye level, we now look at our subjects from a distance, making them insignificant.

At a wedding, drone footage rarely represents what the couple remembers of the event; they were literally – if not metaphorically – at ground level. They did not fly tens of meters in the air of the place. Plus, their favorite photographs will be of them, their family and friends due to the emotional human attachment the photos bring. The drone footage further shows the photographer indulging in unique shots, the graphic video equivalent of the boring drum solo at a progressive rock concert.

Unless there is a specific need for a drone image or footage, leave it in the box and focus on high quality photography and videography instead.

Avoid unethical photographic equipment

It’s something I’ve talked about before, but cheap and mass-produced DSLRs and compact cameras are short lived. In addition, photographers quickly overtake them and they are therefore replaced. As a result, they then end up with more plastic and electronic waste in landfills, polluting the environment. It’s time for manufacturers to focus on producing quality products and ditch cheap, plastic, and low-quality waste. Then we photographers should boycott those who don’t make this change.

Likewise, we should look at where the equipment is manufactured. Considering whether the manufacturing base is in a country with an open democracy or an oppressive regime with a poor human rights record.

What do you think?

Of course, some of these opinions are subjective, and if you’re happy with using Instagram filters, it doesn’t matter. But do you agree or disagree with me with any of these thoughts? Are drone images overexploited? Should we assign signature filters to the recycle bin? Can you see digital effects becoming obsolete?

Maybe you have some techniques you’ve used before that you’d rather be overlooked because they’re now cheesy clichés. Or, maybe you are making buying decisions based on ethical considerations. Let me know in the comments.

Good year!


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Wolves Academy is the star of the Show Racism The Red Card workshop https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/wolves-academy-is-the-star-of-the-show-racism-the-red-card-workshop/ Wed, 01 Dec 2021 07:08:55 +0000 https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/wolves-academy-is-the-star-of-the-show-racism-the-red-card-workshop/ Youth from Woden, Woodfield and Fallings Park schools participated in the event hosted by the SRTRC team led by Fred Harms who described the definition of racism, associated stereotypes and how to report incidents of racism . A video was also released featuring top footballers and athletes discussing their experiences ahead of the Q&A, which […]]]>


Youth from Woden, Woodfield and Fallings Park schools participated in the event hosted by the SRTRC team led by Fred Harms who described the definition of racism, associated stereotypes and how to report incidents of racism .

A video was also released featuring top footballers and athletes discussing their experiences ahead of the Q&A, which included former Wolves Academy graduate and young pro Marlon Walters, and current academic of the Kam Kandola Academy, who has just drawn up his first professional contract.

Walters described his experiences of racism during his childhood and football career, highlighting the vital role of coach Terry Connor during his time at Molineux, while Kandola, who is part of the Inclusion Mentorship Program Asian PFA, echoed views on the importance of calling incidents in in order to eradicate discrimination.

“I think it’s so important that kids have access and understand what to do if they are the victim of racism,” Walters said.

“And this is even for those who see examples with others, not just to receive them directly.

“It is important to understand that it is okay to tackle these incidents, report them and discuss them with a parent or teacher.

“Children learn, times change and our children sometimes become our teachers and keep us up to date with the news and how to run things.

“I felt like in my day when I was a victim of racism, I only knew one or two ways to deal with it, which was conflicting in nature.

“This method was completely ineffective, it was not fair, and if it had continued it would have affected me in the long term.

“If I had attended a workshop like this when I was younger, it would have helped me and given me confidence to tackle it more effectively.

“I had a first hand experience and sometimes it can affect you as an adult, so running workshops like this for young people can be life changing.”

Seth Ejukwu, a campaign worker for Show Racism The Red Card, also joined Walters and Kandola on the panel.

Ejukwu has revealed how being a victim of racism at an English university opened his eyes to the problem, before launching his own online campaign before landing a job at SRTRC.

In revealing how the examples of racism seen in football stadiums or in cricket and other sports reflect society, he also cited an analogy put forward by SRTRC Honorary President, the former goalkeeper of goal Shaka Hislop.

“The young people here are our future leaders and we have to educate them properly,” says Ejukwu.

“We need to make them understand what racism is and how it affects our culture, our society and our community.

“Racism is a social thing and while football as an industry helps tackle this problem, when it occurs in football it is a reflection of the community.

“I think racism is still there and we do our best to let people know that it is still there and how we can come together as a society.

“Shaka’s analogy explains how when the pandemic hit last year, and around the world, everyone was struggling, nobody sat down and said they didn’t care or it didn’t. didn’t bother them.

“Everyone got together to say what do we have to do to survive?

“We have to use the same analogy for racism and shouldn’t just say it happens in football or it happens in cricket, so that’s their problem.

“We have to see it as a problem, like a pandemic, and the only way to eradicate it is to come together in the same way.”

Kandola is Wolves’ only professional of South Asian descent and admits there is added motivation to potentially be a role model youngsters aspire to.

“I think it gives you extra motivation to break down that barrier and, as a South Asian, to be a role model for young boys and try to get them to do the same,” he said.

“To be where I want to be, I have to keep working hard and not get caught up in signing a professional contract and letting go.

“I have to keep working and improving.

Kandola was certainly an inspiration to the young people present at the workshop which provided some really successful and insightful hours for all participants.

“We were very happy to support Show Racism The Red Card with their event here in Molineux,” said Greg Warren, Senior Education Officer for the Foundation.

“The impact on children of educating themselves and educating others in school is fantastic to see.

“Fred and the team were brilliant, and the students from our partner schools in Woodfield, Woden and Fallings Park were very engaged in the workshop and the interviews at the end were a testament to their level of engagement.

Wolves Academy graduates Kam Kandola and Marlon Walters were also brilliant in taking the time to answer students’ questions and giving real-life experience of previous cases and how to report them. “

For Walters meanwhile, who was back at Molineux just a few weeks ago watching his nephew Demarai Gray play for Everton, it’s always special to come back to the club where he spent a decade climbing the ranks.

He went on to enjoy a successful career outside the league, then as a coach and assistant manager, with his main role now focused on managing MW Fitness & Community Care, which specializes in many areas including youth mentoring. as well as health and fitness.

“Every time I come back to Molineux, or even Wolverhampton, it’s like another home for me,” he explained.

“I have met some of my closest friends here, so many great people, and it has taught me discipline.

“It was a multicultural environment with a family atmosphere where I felt included and part of something.

“For me, being able to come back and pass on some of my values ​​and the discoveries of my journey is a special day for which I am very grateful. “


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Signed Rue d’Honneur unveiled for late Louisville photographer Bud Dorsey https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/signed-rue-dhonneur-unveiled-for-late-louisville-photographer-bud-dorsey/ Wed, 27 Oct 2021 02:41:00 +0000 https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/signed-rue-dhonneur-unveiled-for-late-louisville-photographer-bud-dorsey/ A well-known photographer in Louisville – and around the world – received posthumous honor for his commitment to the community. An honorary street sign for Charles “Bud” Dorsey was unveiled at Burwell Avenue and 18th Street on Tuesday. Dorsey worked for the Louisville Defender newspaper and the Courier-Journal for decades. He has also taught skills […]]]>


A well-known photographer in Louisville – and around the world – received posthumous honor for his commitment to the community. An honorary street sign for Charles “Bud” Dorsey was unveiled at Burwell Avenue and 18th Street on Tuesday. Dorsey worked for the Louisville Defender newspaper and the Courier-Journal for decades. He has also taught skills to young people through his West End Photography Club. Background: The Louisville community mourns the death of respected photographer Charles ‘Bud’ Dorsey “The photos he took; he was a great photographer. One of my favorite quotes is,” We rise up lifting the others, “said Yvonne Coleman Bach of the Louisville Defender.” One thing Bud did, he took the time to go back and selflessly lift up other photographers. “Dorsey died in July at the age 80. In 2017, Dorsey published a book of his work titled “Available Light: Louisville Through the Lens by Bud Dorsey.” He described it as a love letter to Louisville.

A photographer known in Louisville – and around the world – received a posthumous honor for his commitment to the community.

An honorary street sign for Charles “Bud” Dorsey was unveiled on Burwell Avenue and 18th Street on Tuesday. Dorsey worked for the Louisville Defender newspaper and the Courier-Journal for decades.

He has also taught skills to young people through his West End Photography Club.

Background: Louisville community mourns the death of respected photographer Charles ‘Bud’ Dorsey

“The photos he took was a great photographer. One of my favorite quotes is, ‘We stand up lifting others,'” said Yvonne Coleman Bach of the Louisville Defender. “One thing Bud did, he took the time to go back and selflessly lift up other photographers.”

Dorsey died in July at the age of 80. In 2017, Dorsey published a book of her work titled “Available Light: Louisville Through the Lens of Bud Dorsey”. He described it as a love letter to Louisville.


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