works art – David Hemmings Bird Photography http://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/ Sat, 12 Mar 2022 02:08:29 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-2021-06-25T155134.587.png works art – David Hemmings Bird Photography http://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/ 32 32 Pittsburgh Foundation awards $215,000 through ‘Exposure Artist’ program https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/pittsburgh-foundation-awards-215000-through-exposure-artist-program/ Sat, 12 Mar 2022 02:01:02 +0000 https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/pittsburgh-foundation-awards-215000-through-exposure-artist-program/ Deavron Dailey can’t decide which he loves more: his hometown of Detroit or his home of 13 years, Pittsburgh. The similarities and contrasts between the two industrial cities have informed much of Dailey’s recent artwork, and a $20,000 grant from the Pittsburgh Foundation’s Exposure Artist program will help this work continue. “I often make two-dimensional […]]]>

Deavron Dailey can’t decide which he loves more: his hometown of Detroit or his home of 13 years, Pittsburgh.

The similarities and contrasts between the two industrial cities have informed much of Dailey’s recent artwork, and a $20,000 grant from the Pittsburgh Foundation’s Exposure Artist program will help this work continue.

“I often make two-dimensional works of art based on the people, places and defining moments of each city through painting, ceramics or printmaking, mainly,” said Dailey, 43, from the Highland district. Pittsburgh Park. “But my goal is to create collaborative situations between creatives, artistic spaces and community development organizations in these two cities that I also love.”

The foundation has awarded a dozen grants totaling $215,000 to support individual artists and arts collectives, with a focus on Black, Indigenous and artists of color working at the intersection of art and activism. , as well as artists who have not previously received funding. For more details on grants and artists, see ThePittsburghFoundation.org/exposureawardees.

Dailey, a self-taught artist, recently completed work on a public mural for Action Housing at William Penn Place, as well as his largest public work to date, ‘The Arms of East Liberty’, created using 128 large square tiles and installed at 5906 Penn Ave. He is currently accepting commissioned work and is a member of the printmaking collective Bloomfield Pullproof Studio and the Union Project collaborative studio in Highland Park.

He spoke with the Trib about the grant and his upcoming plans. The interview has been edited for length.

Q: What do you think are the main similarities and differences between the two cities, and how do you want to represent them artistically?

A: The similarities I see in Detroit and Pittsburgh are that they are both industrial cities, historically and currently. Both towns have always had an energetic artistic and activist community. Additionally, both cities rely on nearby bodies of water as another source of economic viability. In contrast, Pittsburgh is full of hills and Detroit is completely flat. Pittsburgh’s dramatic hills create hundreds of vantage points to view the entire city, but this makes the layout of city streets illogical and difficult to navigate. Detroit is completely flat. There are therefore very few breathtaking views in the residential areas of the city. But the streets are based on the design of a grid, or more like “a spoked wheel”, as I’ve heard it described before. This makes navigating the city quite easy.

Q: What first got you interested in art, and how did that lead to a career out of it?

A: I have been interested in art all my life. As far back as I can remember. It has always been clear to me that being an artist was/is my destiny. Anything outside of that has only been experiences and content to be used later in the production of my art in one form or another.

Q: Is mixed media your main medium?

A: I use a wide range of media to create my work. For me, it is not a question of confining myself to a single medium in order to constitute a large corpus of similar works. Instead, I let any feelings of mood, interest, or inspiration that have been evoked in me determine how and what to use to express what I visualize.

Patrick Varine is an editor at Tribune-Review. You can contact Patrick at 724-850-2862, pvarine@triblive.com or via Twitter .

Categories:
AetE | East End | Highland Park | local | Art & Museums | Pittsburgh

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HAPPY TO EXHIBIT: Artist Clinton’s ‘The Grove’ Pops Up This Summer | Local News https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/happy-to-exhibit-artist-clintons-the-grove-pops-up-this-summer-local-news/ Tue, 01 Mar 2022 01:00:00 +0000 https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/happy-to-exhibit-artist-clintons-the-grove-pops-up-this-summer-local-news/ CLINTON — Local abstract artist Gabi Torres has received a $5,000 grant from the Iowa Department of Cultural Affairs, which she is using to create an outdoor installation called “The Grove.” The grant is part of ongoing efforts to provide relief to Iowa artists and cultural organizations impacted by challenges caused by the COVID pandemic. […]]]>

CLINTON — Local abstract artist Gabi Torres has received a $5,000 grant from the Iowa Department of Cultural Affairs, which she is using to create an outdoor installation called “The Grove.”

The grant is part of ongoing efforts to provide relief to Iowa artists and cultural organizations impacted by challenges caused by the COVID pandemic. Using it to fund “The Grove,” Torres wants to take action to bring about positive change within the community.

When Torres acquired her studio at 83 Main Ave., Clinton, in December 2020, she had wanted it to be more open to the public as a gallery showcasing the work of local artists and a place where she could offer classes. of art. Studio space limitations, however, made it difficult to accommodate social distancing recommendations. Torres was able to secure grants that allowed him to make his art available to the public in other ways.

Torres wants to create more of an arts culture in Clinton and help make it a place that people from other cities will want to visit as an arts destination.

Also, she wants to change the narrative of the city.

“I feel like sometimes people tell each other certain stories about a place where they live, maybe focusing on things that aren’t as positive.” Torres says, “We can start to change the story that we tell ourselves about where we are and where we live, but to help everyone be able to see that, you know, you have to do things to make people realize that this is not the case, or to change their point of view.

To achieve these ambitions, Torres creates his first outdoor installation as a magical forest consisting of 12 paintings of varying sizes, each suspended by eyelets and springs in wooden frames made by Tim Fuller and Charlie Woods of Retired with Wood, and located this summer in Pocket Park in the 100 block of South Fourth Avenue.

The urban aspect of this place contributes to the contrast created by the juxtaposition of something improbable found between two buildings in the city. If consistent with the style that Torres’ other current works have evolved to represent, the pieces included in “The Grove” will be gestural, energetic and lyrical abstract works of art.

Making “The Grove” was not without its challenges. Initially, funding for the project was questioned. The relief grant was originally $10,000. In order to distribute the funds over several projects, this amount has been divided.

“When I saw that, I was like, well, I can’t — I don’t want to do this project for $5,000,” Torres says. “It only really works if it’s at the $10,000 mark.”

The generosity of local businesses and organizations, as well as some very kind people, she said, enabled Torres to make up the amount she wanted to see the project completed to its full potential. Some of those she appreciates for their support, financial or otherwise, include the Iowa Arts Council, Clinton National Bank, Citizens First Bank, Brocolo, Kersh Digital, Clinton Convention and Visitors Bureau, Downtown Clinton Alliance, Josh Eggers of Clinton Parks and Rec, and Brian Lemke, director of public works for Clinton.

Another hurdle early on in creating “The Grove” was what material she was going to paint on.

“The canvas I paint on is not meant to be outdoors – far from it,” she says.

Needing a material that could withstand the outdoor elements, she envisioned a type of canvas used for boat sails. In the end, with the help of Connie Vulich, Torres’ project and event coordinator, and Steve Pearson, owner of Upholstery Unlimited at 1814 N. Second St., Torres settled on the canvas normally used for the soft tops of convertible cars.

“I wouldn’t be able to complete this project without his help,” Torres says of Vulich. “It’s a huge project. It’s a huge undertaking.

So far, Torres and his team of Vulich, Fuller, and Woods have collectively invested hundreds of hours into making “The Grove,” and there’s still a long way to go. At this point, the rest of the frames are being built by Fuller and Woods. Once these are completed, they will measure to find the sizes of the canvases and the quantities of other materials that Torres will need to order before beginning the labor-intensive painting.

Although creating “The Grove” has been a stressful and scary process at times, Torres isn’t going through it alone.

“I have a great team that I work with,” she says. “So one of the reasons why this project is right, for me, as important to me personally as it is, is because of all the different people I work with.”

Learn more about Gabi Torres and her art online at https://gabriella-torres.com.

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Port Ludlow Art League presents artist and jeweler https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/port-ludlow-art-league-presents-artist-and-jeweler/ Sun, 27 Feb 2022 09:30:00 +0000 https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/port-ludlow-art-league-presents-artist-and-jeweler/ PORT LUDLOW — The Port Ludlow Art League’s Artist of the Month is Rose Simon and its Jeweler of the Month is Mara Mauch. The work of both will be exhibited at the Port Ludlow Sound Community Bank at the corner of Oak Bay Road and Osprey Ridge Drive in Port Ludlow, and online at […]]]>

PORT LUDLOW — The Port Ludlow Art League’s Artist of the Month is Rose Simon and its Jeweler of the Month is Mara Mauch.

The work of both will be exhibited at the Port Ludlow Sound Community Bank at the corner of Oak Bay Road and Osprey Ridge Drive in Port Ludlow, and online at www.port ludlowart.org.

Simon’s work can also be seen at http://www.etsy.com/shop/rosesimonarts.

Mauch’s work can also be seen at the Port Ludlow Art Gallery adjacent to the bank.

To buy an artwork, send an e-mail [email protected] to make a sales appointment or, for Mauch’s work, head to the Port Ludlow Art Gallery, which is open from noon to 4 p.m. Thursdays and Fridays.

Often whimsical, Simon uses bright colors and incorporates humor into his works. She said she believes color is the universal language that brings positive energy and communicates strong emotions.

She participated in many creative arts and healing programs while living in Montana and taught creative journaling for 15 years. When she moved to Washington, she continued to immerse herself in the art of healing, such as teaching a stroke survivor to draw and paint with her non-dominant hand.

Simon’s favorite subjects are bears, birds, abstract cats and imaginative landscapes. She hopes people will feel the positive energy of her works.

Mauch uses a kiln to fuse multiple layers of glass together to create cabochons that become necklaces, bracelets, and earrings. After applying shimmering metallic coatings to the fired pieces, she shapes the pieces by hand and then anneals them, often repeating this process until she achieves the ideal result.

Even after 30 years of creating glass jewelry and artwork, Mauch never tires of experimenting with glass.

“Every time I open the oven after baking, it’s like opening a present on Christmas morning,” she says. “It never gets boring.”

Guest speaker

The league’s guest speaker this month will be Catherine Alice Michaelis, who will discuss “artists’ books as storytellers and story-catchers.”

Michaelis will present the program online at 1 p.m. on March 16. Those interested in attending the Zoom conference can email [email protected] no later than March 14 for more information.

Michaelis is the owner of May Day Press and has been exploring what an artist’s book can be for 30 years, organizers said.

She works with antique printing presses, movable type, and any printable medium to invoke a dialogue with nature, including paper, fabric, film, magnets, and veneer.

When Michaelis isn’t printing, she sews unique works on fabrics that address gender, ageism and memory loss, organizers said, adding that her creativity is showcased through writing, video poetry, animation and direct dyeing from plants.

She has worked with scientists, writers, visual artists, and even a musician to do publishing print jobs, and has responded to crowdfunding calls, been invited by print institutions to participate in collective works and has curated invitational print sets, such as Stack the Deck: 18 Artists Mark the Cards for Women’s Health and Healing. Catherine is also Associate Director of the Cynthia Sears Artist Book Collection at the Bainbridge Island Museum of Art.

Collective exhibition

The group exhibition, which runs through March at the Bay Club, features 40 artworks created for the Shades of Red theme.

Although there are nearly 100 shades of red, the most popular shades of red are vermilion, wine, scarlet, ruby, and carmine. In Egyptian culture, red was often associated with life, health and victory. In Western countries, red is often associated with excitement, passion and danger.

Participating artists include Alan Ahtow, Ann Arscott, Joan Astin, Brenda Barcelo, Ann Bernard, Fran Bodman, JoAnna Caro, Carol Avoy Durbin, Ann Gagnier, Sheryl Goldsberry, Gary Griswold, Vicky Foster Harrison, Gail Larson, Carolyn Layton, David Layton , Pamela Raine, Randy Radock, Donna Thompson and Diane Walker,

Additionally, in the lobby are abstract works of art by Webber.

For more information on the art exhibitions at the Bay Club at 120 Spinnaker Place in Port Ludlow, email Alan Ahtow at [email protected]

Trade exhibitions

Several local businesses exhibit the works of the league’s artists.

Through April, Active Life Physical Therapy will feature watercolors by Gary Griswold, Coldwell Banker Best Realty will exhibit abstract collages and acrylic paintings by JoAnna Caro, The Beach Club will exhibit acrylic paintings and watercolors by Fran Bodman, and the Post Office of Port Ludlow feature oil prints by Ken Crawford.

Mara Mauch, who creates multi-layered glass jewellery, is the Port Ludlow Art League Jeweler of the Month.

“You’ll never believe what happened today,” is from Rose Simon, the Port Ludlow Art League’s Artist of the Month.


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Transformer Station examines humanity’s relationship with the violin in a unique photographic exhibition https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/transformer-station-examines-humanitys-relationship-with-the-violin-in-a-unique-photographic-exhibition/ Sun, 13 Feb 2022 13:35:00 +0000 https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/transformer-station-examines-humanitys-relationship-with-the-violin-in-a-unique-photographic-exhibition/ CLEVELAND, Ohio — Visitors used to seeing big, bold, up-to-the-minute works of art at the Transformer Station gallery in Ohio City may be surprised by all the sepia flooding the walls this winter. The gallery is full of tintypes, daguerreotypes, albumen prints and other forms of early photography, as well as images made with everything […]]]>

CLEVELAND, Ohio — Visitors used to seeing big, bold, up-to-the-minute works of art at the Transformer Station gallery in Ohio City may be surprised by all the sepia flooding the walls this winter.

The gallery is full of tintypes, daguerreotypes, albumen prints and other forms of early photography, as well as images made with everything from mid-century 35mm film cameras to the latest digital cameras.

The subject of this visual tsunami is an exhibition of photographs of violinists and their instruments.

Drawn from the funds of Pittsburgh-based collector and Akron native Evan Mirapaul, the show delves into a seemingly minor subject matter that turns out to be oceanic in its vastness.

With more than 250 photos hung frame by frame on entire walls, the Mirapaul exhibit is obsessively narrow but wildly wide. It’s an exercise in visual overload, a minor visual symphony of an offbeat motif. It’s crazy, crazy, fantastic and fun.

The backstory

A former professional musician who served as assistant principal second violinist for the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra and co-founder of the New York-based Elements Quartet, Mirapaul fell into photography after his father put him in touch with an Akron lawyer in 1989 that needed help assessing the value of an estate left by a pair of local musicians, Sam and Sylvia Spinak.

The Spinaks were avid collectors of instruments, books, documents and photographs, including a significant number of images of violinists. Mirapaul ultimately determined that the collection was of little value, although she intrigued him enough to acquire it through Summit County probate court.

Mirapaul sold the instruments, books, and documents, but continued to sift through the photos. His interest in photography deepened after moving to New York in the 1990s. Eventually, through discussions with contacts at the International Center of Photography, he realized he could use the images of violinists of the Spinak estate as the nucleus of something greater that he would assemble himself.

As Mirapaul discovered, the prevalence of images in which people posed with a violin is enormous, especially from the mid-19th century to the mid-20th century. Indeed, the exhibition, on view until Sunday April 3, doubles as an overview of the history of photography largely through this period, from top to bottom, from professional to amateur and elite to day-to-day.

Curated by Dan Leers, the curator of photography at the Carnegie Museum of Art in Pittsburgh, the show debuts at Transformer Station, which houses and exhibits the photography collection of Cleveland collectors Fred and Laura Bidwell and also doubles as a part-time as a branch of the Cleveland Museum of Art.

(Collecting photos isn’t Mirapaul’s only cultural endeavor. He also created Troy Hill Art Houses in Pittsburgh, a growing collection of private homes transformed by artists into works of art that can be viewed by appointment. Details are available at troyhillarthouses.com.)

Dive into

One way to approach the photo exhibit is to search for images of famous violinists, including Fritz Kreisler, Isaac Stern, Jascha Heifetz, and Yehudi Menuhin. They are all there, depicted in publicity photos, official portraits, pictures in Life magazine and photos pasted on album covers.

Another approach is to seek out masterpieces by the world’s greatest photographers, including Julia Margaret Cameron, Andre Kertesz, Alfred Eisenstadt, Irving Penn, Yousuf Karsh and Henri Cartier-Bresson, all scattered throughout the exhibition .

Cameron, for example, is represented by two prints of her 1868 portrait of Joseph Joachim, (1831-1907), the internationally renowned Hungarian violinist to whom Johannes Brahms dedicated his violin concerto in D major, Opus 77.

Kertesz, on the other hand, captured a famous image in 1921 of a blind Hungarian violinist dressed in tattered clothes who is guided by a boy down a dirt road in Abony, a small town near Budapest.

The violin and love of music are what unite Cameron’s globetrotting virtuoso and the sunken-cheeked street musician of Kertesz, who could be one of the bony spectra of Picasso’s Blue Period paintings.

Such comparisons show how Mirapaul’s collection encompasses a cross section of humanity reminiscent of the famous 1955 photography exhibition, “The Family of Man,” curated by Edward Steichen at the Museum of Modern Art in New York.

But while the MOMA exhibition highlighted photography as an art produced by master practitioners, the Mirapaul collection owes much of its charm, humanism and spirit to the vernacular works of photographers whose names are lost to history.

anonymous power

The exhibition revels in images produced by anonymous shooters for advertisements and publicity stills for Hollywood films such as “Intermezzo” (1939, Leslie Howard, Ingrid Bergman); and “Alexander’s Ragtime Band” (1938, Tyrone Power, Don Ameche).

Hundreds of images by unidentified 19th and early 20th century professional portrait photographers are also on display.

Among them is a large hand-colored 1863 tintype of an unidentified Union soldier in his uniform, shown seated while holding his violin and bow in such a way that the bow and fingerboard create lines perfectly parallel.

Another photo by an unidentified photographer shows a disheveled Albert Einstein sitting in front of a music stand in a suit with his shirttails on while practicing with his violin.

The photo, taken after Einstein fled Nazi Germany and settled in the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton, New Jersey, is a reminder that the world’s most famous physicist loved playing Mozart because, in his words , the music was “so pure that it seemed to have been ubiquitous in the universe, waiting to be discovered by the master.

But the spectacle is not always so noble. It also includes a 1961 magazine advertisement featuring a scantily-dressed female violinist pondering whether to accept a cigarette from a man whose hand is intruding into the lower left corner of the shot, carrying fumes .

The ad copy suggestively asks, “Should a gentleman offer a Tiparillo to a violinist?” (“After all, if she likes the offer, she could start playing. No strings attached.”)

Instrument of Transcendence

Throughout the show, regardless of context, the violin emerges as a symbol of status and aspiration that transcends race and class.

When he took a photo of three well-dressed black children practicing the violin in a Pittsburgh classroom, Charles “Teenie” Harris, captured an image of normal middle-class American endeavors.

But the violin can also function as a symbol of cultural imperialism, as indicated by images of Indian, Chinese and Japanese violinists, who adopted the instrument during the era of European colonization.

Even so, the violin exerted a reverse flow of influence from East to West. A wonderful series of photos from Japan documents the influence of Shinichi Suzuki (1898-1998), the Japanese violinist who invented a teaching method and teaching philosophy that became hugely popular around the world.

One of the show’s most memorable anonymous photos depicts hundreds of Japanese children lined up in a massive collective performance in 1968.

Given that the Mirapaul collection thins out as it reaches the later decades, the show may indicate that as a cultural icon, the violin may be losing some of its influence.

Mirapaul speculates in an interview printed in a flyer accompanying the exhibit that the violin has been replaced by the electric guitar as a cultural totem.

But classical music and the violin seem unlikely to disappear any time soon. As the exhibition suggests, the connection between humanity and the violin runs deep. This relationship makes it likely that anyone who masters such a difficult instrument will want to pose for a photo with it now and in the future.

REVIEW

What’s up: “In concert: photography and the violin”.

Place: Transformer station.

Or: 1460 W. 29th St., Cleveland.

When: Until Sunday April 3.

Admission: To free. Call 216-938-5429 or visit transformerstation.org.

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An artist cuts animals and flora on sheets of paper https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/an-artist-cuts-animals-and-flora-on-sheets-of-paper/ Sun, 06 Feb 2022 13:26:14 +0000 https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/an-artist-cuts-animals-and-flora-on-sheets-of-paper/ British artist Pippa Dyrlaga only needs a precision knife and paper to start creating. With just a few tools, she is able to masterfully cut animals large and small from simple sheets of paper, from striped tigers to scaly chameleons to fluffy squirrels. While Dyrlaga’s precision paper cuts can make practicing easy, she has been […]]]>

British artist Pippa Dyrlaga only needs a precision knife and paper to start creating. With just a few tools, she is able to masterfully cut animals large and small from simple sheets of paper, from striped tigers to scaly chameleons to fluffy squirrels.

While Dyrlaga’s precision paper cuts can make practicing easy, she has been meticulously perfecting her craft for over 10 years. A work of art can take several hours, as the artist must carefully cut and carve all the little holes you see in the piece. Only in this way is she able to produce the fascinating textures that decorate the forms of these animal and vegetable figures.

In addition to hand-cutting all of these elaborate works of art, Dyrlaga also adds colorful touches to his designs, such as painting the feathers of a bird and the fur patterns of an anteater. This enhances the delicate intricacy of the many tiny marks on the paper.

You can buy original artwork through Dyrlaga’s website and keep up to date with the artist’s latest projects by following her on Instagram.

Paper artist Pippa Dyrlaga cuts a menagerie of plants and animals out of paper.

Paper cut animals by Pippa DyrlagaPaper cut animals by Pippa DyrlagaPaper cut animals by Pippa DyrlagaPaper cut animals by Pippa DyrlagaPaper cut by Pippa DyrlagaPaper cut animals by Pippa DyrlagaPaper cut animals by Pippa DyrlagaPaper cut animals by Pippa DyrlagaPaper cut animals by Pippa DyrlagaPaper cut animals by Pippa DyrlagaPippa Dyrlaga: Website | Facebook | instagram

My Modern Met has granted permission to feature photos of Pippa Dyrlaga.

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The artist Maria Dolores opens the show of the “Month of love of art” https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/the-artist-maria-dolores-opens-the-show-of-the-month-of-love-of-art/ Thu, 03 Feb 2022 01:18:00 +0000 https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/the-artist-maria-dolores-opens-the-show-of-the-month-of-love-of-art/ By Mike Cook “I never dreamed of being an artist,” said Maria Dolores, who began taking art classes in the mid-1990s after retiring as sales and marketing director for the Hilton Inn in Las Cruces. “I really got into it,” said the entertainer, who goes by his first and middle names. (His surname is Neukirch. […]]]>

By Mike Cook

“I never dreamed of being an artist,” said Maria Dolores, who began taking art classes in the mid-1990s after retiring as sales and marketing director for the Hilton Inn in Las Cruces.

“I really got into it,” said the entertainer, who goes by his first and middle names. (His surname is Neukirch. Hush.)

Originally from New York, Dolores will celebrate her 38th birthdayand birthday in Las Cruces in April.

She studied with some of the best art teachers of the last quarter century, including Sally Quillin, Fred Chilton, Joe Ireland and Jan Archey.

Dolores has had exhibitions at the Thomas Branigan Memorial Library, Cutter Gallery, Doña Ana Arts Council (DAAC), and Frame & Art Center. She has donated artwork for an Open Doors Art Auction to benefit the Jardin de los Niños child care program, presented her work at the 2019 Holiday Pop-Up Art Show and presented works of art to Salud! de Mesilla – a seven-foot door turned with a depiction of the organ mountains in acrylic and woodchip – when the restaurant opened, and at Bank of the West.

During her DAAC show, Dolores participated in an online auction, selling the five pieces she had offered.

She sold eight pieces during a 2021 show at the Frame & Art Center, with one customer buying six pieces and one sale coming from one requested piece after the show, Dolores said.

“I’m still in shock,” she said, adding her deep gratitude for the galleries and other businesses and art lovers around the world who continue to support her work as an artist.

It’s no wonder Dolores is hosting another exhibit at the Frame & Art Center, 1100 S. Main St., Suite 208. Her work will be featured there in February, during Art Love Month in Las Cruces. and Mesilla.

Dolores’ show opening reception will be held from 1-3 p.m. on Saturday, February 5 at the Frame and Art Center. Due to the pandemic, no refreshments will be served.

Dolores mainly paints in watercolors and acrylics. And, though she’s an animal lover — she shares her West Mesa home with two dogs, ages 11 and 13 — Dolores doesn’t have a favorite subject.

“If I see something that excites me, I paint it,” she said.

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San Jose artist returns to Milpitas Gallery for juried exhibition – The Mercury News https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/san-jose-artist-returns-to-milpitas-gallery-for-juried-exhibition-the-mercury-news/ Sun, 30 Jan 2022 15:10:24 +0000 https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/san-jose-artist-returns-to-milpitas-gallery-for-juried-exhibition-the-mercury-news/ For nine years after 9/11, San Jose artist Laurie Barna used the Statue of Liberty as a muse and model for more than 100 paintings. Two of Barna’s “Liberty Series” paintings are among the works in the annual juried art exhibition at the Dove Art Gallery in Milpitas. Barna, who has exhibited other works from […]]]>

For nine years after 9/11, San Jose artist Laurie Barna used the Statue of Liberty as a muse and model for more than 100 paintings. Two of Barna’s “Liberty Series” paintings are among the works in the annual juried art exhibition at the Dove Art Gallery in Milpitas.

Barna, who has exhibited other works from the series at the gallery, said she wanted people looking at the paintings to feel their impact from across the room and ask themselves, “What is it? what is she trying to say?

The Almaden Valley resident has had works in several exhibitions at the Milpitas site, and not all of them were part of her “Liberty series,” which she concluded in 2010 after completing 117 paintings. Barna also uses watercolors to create still lifes and capture nature scenes.

Barna is one of 80 artists in the juried exhibition, which opens on February 13. The exhibition features works of art in a variety of styles and mediums by adult and student artists.

Milpitas artist Mythili Kattupalli exhibits several works of art, including an acrylic painting titled “Trapped”. The painting reflects her emotions after being isolated during the pandemic and depicts the dichotomy of despair and hope symbolized by a human butterfly emerging from a dark cocoon into a world of vibrant color.

Student work in the exhibit includes “Frog on a Leaf,” a drawing by 10-year-old Cindy Xu that shows a colorful tree frog illuminated on a moonlit night.

The exhibition opens February 13, noon to 3 p.m., at the Dove Art Gallery, Park Victoria Church, 875 S. Park Victoria Drive, Milpitas. The gallery will be open every Sunday, from noon to 3 p.m., until April 17. Contact Dove@ParkVictoria.org for more information.

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A photographer’s constant search for the spontaneous https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/a-photographers-constant-search-for-the-spontaneous/ Thu, 27 Jan 2022 16:34:43 +0000 https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/a-photographers-constant-search-for-the-spontaneous/ I first picked up a camera at 14, fueled by an obsession and love for photography. And I’ve had that same drive ever since. These images are excerpts from my ever-growing personal work. Images that don’t always have a rhyme and a reason or even a purpose other than to satisfy my desire to do […]]]>

I first picked up a camera at 14, fueled by an obsession and love for photography. And I’ve had that same drive ever since.

These images are excerpts from my ever-growing personal work. Images that don’t always have a rhyme and a reason or even a purpose other than to satisfy my desire to do something fun and maybe create something I’ve never done before. How about we try this? What will it look like upside down, or with this color, or in total darkness? Often I try to come up with an absurd idea or get inspiration from other images, TV shows, movies and everyday life.

I see humor and beauty in many things, especially people. I am a natural person. I often say that I try to make extraordinary images from ordinary, ordinary people. I practice on my friends and associates almost all the time. Luckily for me, I have access to a lot of people who don’t mind being photographed. Without them, I wouldn’t be as happy as I am.

They trust me to experiment with them on camera. This allows me to play with various lighting techniques, accessories and concepts. I never know exactly how something is going to turn out until I’m knee-deep in the process or when the photoshoot is over. And I’m in awe at the end, just like the subject.

I love how spontaneous this way of making art can be. Truly organic. This feeling is addictive. Force a habit to do more photo shoots. The challenge is always to try not to repeat the same thing, but to look at something from a different angle. Literally trying to do the impossible.

Styling: Cherie Scurry-Burns. Makeup: Sharron Bullock.

Brianna Williams, 31, and Christian Davis, 25, both of Maryland, got engaged in October 2022 and welcomed their son, Azure, four months ago. For their maternity shoot, stylist Cherie Scurry-Burns was inspired by themes of Mother Earth and the Garden of Eden. The pose of the couple, on the other hand, evokes the symbol of yin and yang, a deliberate choice by Joseph, inspired by their infinite love for each other. “They are each other’s yin to yang,” he says. “I really wanted that to show through in the photographs.”

For this image, Joseph was inspired by a “photo giant”: Albert Watson. The fashion photographer’s image of a ballet dancer wrapped in fabric prompted Joseph to create his own version. “I loved the movement of the fabric, the way it ebbs and flows and mimics liquid once it’s suspended in the air,” Joseph says. Pictured: model Malon Chandler of Fredericksburg, Virginia.

Styling: Cherie Scurry-Burns. Makeup: Sharron Bullock.

In 2020, a California production company called Circadian Pictures held a contest for artists to create works centered around the coronavirus. Joseph jumped at the chance to enter. With stylist Cherie Scurry-Burns and makeup artist Sharron Bullock, he creates SheRo (model Maya Corey from Washington), who, along with his sidekick, Headress, will save humanity from the pandemic. “What if a superhero could save us?” Joseph asks. The image was a finalist in the competition.

My fascination with angels led me to take this last photo,” writes Joseph. “I feel like the angels not only watch us but also save us quite often without our knowledge,” he says. “I’ve had a few car accidents where I only came away with a few scratches – I credit divine intervention, of course.” He gathered a few of his friends for a photoshoot, using large wings to evoke various moods. Pictured is model David Carter from Washington.

It would be so much easier if I could speak their language,” Joseph says, joking about the challenge of photographing animals. This particular photoshoot was hilarious because the dog, Hershey, was extremely rambunctious. Luckily Megan Jones, owner of Furever Fab dog shop, had dog snacks on hand. She and Hershey had a great relationship. “Hershey followed Megan everywhere she went – and it’s not even her dog!” said Joseph. Jones had borrowed it from a friend for the photo shoot. Joseph says he enjoys photographing the bond between people and pets. “Such incredible loyalty from the pet and the pet owner is love the world needs every day,” he says.

Joseph is always on the lookout for eye-catching props to use in photo shoots. He spotted this mask at a Halloween-themed store — and he knew it would fit in with his quirky shooting style. “I’ve always been drawn to weirdness, but with respect,” he says, adding, “This eyeball mask is just for the money. Its weirdness is why I love it so much. For decades month, he was looking forward to using it for a fashion shoot.The opportunity arose when 28-year-old Brandon Metz, aka DJ Fade the Future, came over from the New York area to take pictures for his model portfolio.

Joseph kept his promise to his friend Donna Holley-Beasley, a local makeup artist, to do a photo shoot for her. Here, model Liliana McGee, 18, of Bowie, Maryland, wears a piece of hooded fabric that stylist Jodie Johnson brought on set. Liliana looked natural on camera, using fabric to create movement — which can add a lot to a photo, notes Joseph. “I love the feelings it can evoke, especially when it comes to chiffons and silks,” he says. “In some cases, it may look like liquid floating in the air.”

While brainstorming for a photo shoot with his friend and stylist Cherie Scurry-Burns, Joseph had an idea. Step 1: Grab all the animal print clothes and accessories you can think of. Step 2: Take makeup artist Sharron Bullock with you. Step 3: Head to the Eastern Market. Joseph loves how the neighborhood almost feels “that Cherie is in Paris, a place famous for her taste in clothes.” The outing was a thrill for the trio: “As a team, we always do photo shoots for other people, and that day was our turn just for fun.”

Joseph met 28-year-old DeVonte Thomas at a restaurant a few years ago, and they quickly became friends. When Thomas, a professional basketball player from the International Basketball Federation (FIBA), decided to pose for a photoshoot, Joseph knew exactly what he would be focusing on. “I’ve always admired people with tattoos,” Joseph says. “I wish I had the courage to get a tattoo. Instead, I live vicariously through other people with ink. They are walking works of art and expression.

For a photoshoot with model Monica Ajak, stylist Cherie Scurry-Burns came up with an unconventional approach: a gold face mask. Joseph was lukewarm about the concept, but he remained open: “Bring it on and I’ll see what happens,” he recalls saying. But during filming, he decided to go another direction and asked Ajak to take off the mask. As she began to remove it, Joseph said, her reaction caught his attention. “The harder she pulled, the better her expression was,” he says. The result: one of his favorite images to date.

It’s not often that Joseph puts makeup artist Sharron Bullock on camera. Cherie Scurry-Burns styled the clothes and worked out the hair. Bullock added smoke from his vape pen for added drama. “It was an afternoon playing on set and trying to create something visually unique,” ​​Joseph explains. The three often work together on photo shoots, and their team chemistry is evident in this photo.

I believe angels walk among us disguised as mere mortals,” Joseph said. He has worked on and off for the past few years on an angel-themed photo series with his friends, including Malon Chandler of Fredricksburg, Virginia. To capture this moment, Joseph had Chandler run through the grass and jump through the air. — dozens of times. “That picture ended up being one of my favorites,” Joseph says. “He looks like he’s coming – his toes are about to hit the ground.”

When makeup artist Donna Holley-Beasley wanted to film her work, she turned to Joseph. For this shoot, they brought in three models, each with different skin tones to show off the Holley-Beasley lineup. The trio included Alexis Wilkerson, pictured here. “Alexis has a regal way of behaving,” Joseph says, “and I wanted to take advantage of that character on camera.” The fabric – a move inspired by stylist Jodie Johnson – adds a touch of mystery.

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Maine Lives Lost: Artist’s family mourns ‘hero’ after long battle with COVID https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/maine-lives-lost-artists-family-mourns-hero-after-long-battle-with-covid/ Thu, 27 Jan 2022 09:00:01 +0000 https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/maine-lives-lost-artists-family-mourns-hero-after-long-battle-with-covid/ Perry Clark loved to make art – large murals, signs for stores, custom pieces for cars, trucks and motorcycles. Perry Clark’s family members say he was a gentleman and scholar with a passion for art. Photo obituary In the workshop he set up in the garage of his home in Buxton, he always had a […]]]>

Perry Clark loved to make art – large murals, signs for stores, custom pieces for cars, trucks and motorcycles.

Perry Clark’s family members say he was a gentleman and scholar with a passion for art. Photo obituary

In the workshop he set up in the garage of his home in Buxton, he always had a project going.

He loved color, all colors, and he looked so excited when he felt he got the perfect picture, said his son, Bryce Clark of Portland.

“He was a perfectionist,” said Bryce Clark, 31. “When he brought something to life, it brought it to life. You could see it in his eyes.

Clark loved life. But he was also strong-willed, stubborn and fearless, and he saw no need to get vaccinated against COVID-19.

Clark, who chose not to get vaccinated, died Jan. 9 of complications from COVID-19. He was 61 years old. He had spent 47 days in hospital.

On the day of his death, his his son wrote a poignant tribute to his “hero”. Bryce Clark later said he felt compelled to write the Facebook post as an appeal to unvaccinated Mainers who doubt the seriousness of COVID-19.

He posted a photo of his father in a hospital bed, on a ventilator, surrounded by his family. He described how family crisis took over Thanksgiving and Christmas. He said he tried to convince his father to get vaccinated to protect his life.

Perry Clark shows a mural he painted in the hallway of a private home. Courtesy of the Clark family

“We all make decisions in life, and I respect yours as much as I respect my dad’s,” Bryce Clark wrote. “There were dinner parties that I felt like I had ruined trying to convince him to change his mind and conversations that had to be put aside because unconditional love for another sometimes means acceptance. to disagree on issues so as not to ruin a special occasion.Sometimes that love means biting your tongue when you feel like screaming.

Perry Clark was in hospital for 47 days before his death from COVID-19 on January 9. He was intubated, on a ventilator. Courtesy of the Clark family

Clark’s family members say he was a gentleman and a scholar with a passion for art. A native of California, he graduated from Fresno State College with a degree in Industrial Design and a minor in Metallurgy. He was a successful sign writer, mural painter, and silver jewelry maker.

In California, according to his obituary, he was best known for painting messages on giant water towers in orchards to announce birthdays, weddings and events. In Maine, he produced great works of art for homes and businesses – a billowing American flag on the side of Plummer’s Shop ‘n Save in Buxton; a pizza, a steak and cheese sub, a muffin and a cup of coffee on a Low’s Variety truck at Bar Mills.

Clark has won awards for his automobile and motorcycle designs, his son said. He could put an angel on the gas tank of a motorcycle; shoot flames at a van; an owl’s head on the hood of a car. He was always thrilled to peel back the paint tape to reveal his art and see his proud reflection come back to him, his son said.

“Every time he painted something, you could hear him say, ‘Naughty,'” his son said. “Wicked was one of his favorite words.”

Clark liked to try new things and he had imagined an installation to show his art with movement and texture. He sketched the drawing in 25 pages and was so excited about it before he got sick. It saddened his son that his father never had the chance to carry him out.

Perry Clark painted the American flag mural on the side of Plummer’s Shop’n’Save in Buxton. It is still in good condition. Courtesy of the Clark family

Clark’s two children opened up about how engaged and involved he was in their lives all the time.

When Bryce Clark joined the Cubs, his father became a den leader. He also took martial arts lessons with his son.

“He took us for walks in the woods and built forts along the way,” Bryce Clark said. “He was a kid at heart and wanted nothing more than to hang out with us. If we wanted to go for a walk, he wanted to come with us. He was the most caring and loving dad you could imagine. , and more.

His daughter, Sara Hope Clark, 27, of Sunnyvale, Calif., broke down in tears when she said she had written all of her college essays about her father. She said he taught her to be fiercely independent and a creative problem-solver and could make everything feel special or magical. She described going to the beach with him during a thunderstorm and playing for hours with him in the Saco River.

“He loved being a father more than anything,” she said. “I went through some notes in his office recently. I read a note that said, “I’m only happy when I’m a parent and painting.” I’m the saddest for the future and not being able to relive those moments with him.

One of the cars that Perry Clark painted. “Every time he painted something, you could hear him say, ‘Wicked,'” Bryce Clark said of his father. “Wicked was one of his favorite words.” Courtesy of the Clark family

Clark was engaged to marry Sandra Pelletier, his partner of 13 years. In recent years he has been active with the Standish Kiwanis Club and Buxton Masonic Lodge, where he served as both president and lodge master.

He enjoyed dancing and spending time in Florida with Pelletier.

It was in mid-November, when Clark and Pelletier were driving from Maine to Florida, that they both fell ill. They spent two days in Florida before returning to Maine.

On November 23, they tested positive for COVID-19. Clark was admitted to Northern Light Mercy Hospital in Portland, where he was placed on a ventilator the following day. He was then transported to Maine Medical Center, where he died with his children and his fiancée at his bedside.

At Perry Clark’s funeral, his family hung the print that reads ‘Everything will be fine’, which was a gift to two of his children in the summer of 2021. Bryce Clark, Perry’s son, said ‘it’ was so intrinsically a reflection of his optimism that we felt it was important. One of his old paint cans is displayed on the altar here along with his brushes and airbrushes. The family later used it as an urn for his ashes. Courtesy of the Clark family

“COVID-19 is a terrible, vicious and heartless thing,” Bryce Clark wrote on Facebook. “There is a void he leaves in his wake that quickly fills with grief, rage and confusion. …But against all odds, my family still finds joy that my father is finally free to do what he always told us was the pinnacle of art – mastering his lifelong quest. He always said that painting the sun and clouds at sunset was the epitome of imitating heavenly perfection on earth. Today my father can freely paint sunrise and sunset with all the perfect colors that only the sky can provide.

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River City Photographic Art Artist of the Month for January at Vigo Library | the life of the valley https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/river-city-photographic-art-artist-of-the-month-for-january-at-vigo-library-the-life-of-the-valley/ Sat, 08 Jan 2022 05:00:00 +0000 https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/river-city-photographic-art-artist-of-the-month-for-january-at-vigo-library-the-life-of-the-valley/ A mix of figurative and abstract photographic art by Sheila K. Ter Meer will be on display throughout January in the Gallery space of the River City Art Association’s Artist of the Month at the County Public Library of Vigo. The Brazilian native has been honored for her nature photographs in the TREES Inc. and […]]]>


A mix of figurative and abstract photographic art by Sheila K. Ter Meer will be on display throughout January in the Gallery space of the River City Art Association’s Artist of the Month at the County Public Library of Vigo.

The Brazilian native has been honored for her nature photographs in the TREES Inc. and Indiana Nature Conservancy competitions, but finds the recognition of her abstract designs most gratifying.

His photograph-based abstract titled “Vegas Elvis 1977” was on the jury for the Swope Art Museum’s 75th Annual Wabash Valley Exhibition. Other unique designs have been selected for exhibitions at the Arts Illiana Gallery, the Indiana University-East Whitewater Valley Art Competition, and an international juryed exhibition “SELF Portrait 2019” at a contemporary art gallery in Harrisonburg, in Virginia.

“To satisfy my enthusiasm for fantasy and fantasy – anything playful or whimsical, as an artistic creation – I take a creative license with my photographic images to design unique abstractions,” said Ter Meer, explaining the method to his artist. Madness.

“I combine digital processes with traditional photographic techniques to intensify colors and distort form. Brilliant drawings in black negative space compare some of my artistic expressions to black light and scratchboard art.

“Once an abstract design is completed, the first image or emotion that my mind conjures up often determines its title,” she added. “Although, like the Rorschach test, the subjectivity of my ‘inkblots’ is open to interpretation by the viewer.”

In order for many of his unique works of art to gain even more attention, Ter Meer tries to “think outside the box”. By removing conventional settings and exposing the image to canvas, leather, hardboard, wood, acrylic or metal, she said “to create a unique presentation and a spectacular visual experience.” A summary, “Rainbow Galaxy”, was the inspiration for his “Somewhere” is out there … fantasy on YouTube at https://youtu.be/tuijDXpF6Dk.

In addition to the Ultimate Swope Honor and a Best of Show at the Covered Bridge Art Association Gallery in Rockville, Ter Meer owns works of art in the permanent art collection at Indiana State University and the Rose- Hulman Institute of Technology.

For more information, visit RiverCityArt.org and SheilaTphotography.wordpress.com.


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