united states – David Hemmings Bird Photography http://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/ Tue, 15 Mar 2022 01:54:43 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-2021-06-25T155134.587.png united states – David Hemmings Bird Photography http://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/ 32 32 Underwater Photography Drones Market Analysis by 2022-2029 https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/underwater-photography-drones-market-analysis-by-2022-2029/ Tue, 15 Mar 2022 01:43:39 +0000 https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/underwater-photography-drones-market-analysis-by-2022-2029/ New Jersey, United States,- we published research papers for “Global Underwater Photography Drones Market Report, Trends and Forecast 2022-2029, Insights by Company, Region, Product and Application”. Market production capacity, production volume, sales volume, sales, price and future trend of Underwater Photography Drones are explained. We will focus on the product features, product specifications, prices, sales […]]]>

New Jersey, United States,- we published research papers for “Global Underwater Photography Drones Market Report, Trends and Forecast 2022-2029, Insights by Company, Region, Product and Application”. Market production capacity, production volume, sales volume, sales, price and future trend of Underwater Photography Drones are explained. We will focus on the product features, product specifications, prices, sales revenue of major manufacturers in global and Chinese markets, and market share of major manufacturers in global and Chinese markets. Historical data is from 2018 to 2021, and forecast data is from 2022 to 2029.

Market Research Intellect provides market research reports, F/S, commissioned research, IPO advice, business plans, and more. to provide you with useful information and data for your global and new business.

Get | Download Sample Copy with TOC, Charts and List of Figures @ https://www.marketresearchintellect.com/download-sample/?rid=401045

The XX% of the Global Underwater Photography Drones Market in 2021, but it is expected to grow at a CAGR of XX% in the post-Corona period and reach XX million US$ in 2029. Electronics will grow at an average annual growth rate (CARG) of XX% until 2029 and will occupy about XX% share by 2029.

Underwater photography drone market scale and world segment

The Global Underwater Photography Drones Market can be split by company, region, product, and application. Key companies, stakeholders, and other participants in the global Wireframe Semiconductor Market can use this report as an important resource. This report focuses on sales performance and forecast by company, region (country), product and application from 2019 to 2029.

Key Players Covered in Underwater Photography Drones Markets:

  • breaststroke
  • Nautical
  • OpenROV
  • power vision
  • TT Robotix
  • Vxfly smart technology

Underwater Photography Drones Market Split By Type:

  • remote control type
  • connected type
  • Others

Underwater Photography Drones Market Split By Application:

  • Cruise
  • shipping
  • Patrol
  • Others

The Underwater Photography Drones Market report has been segregated into distinct categories such as product type, application, end-user, and region. Each segment is valued based on CAGR, share, and growth potential. In the regional analysis, the report highlights the prospective region, which is expected to generate opportunities in the Global Underwater Photography Drones Market in the coming years. This segmental analysis will surely prove to be a useful tool for readers, stakeholders, and market players to get a complete picture of the global Underwater Photography Drones market and its growth potential in the years to come. to come.

Get | Discount on the purchase of this report @ https://www.marketresearchintellect.com/ask-for-discount/?rid=401045

Scope of the Underwater Photography Drones Market Report

Report attribute Details
Market size available for years 2022 – 2029
Reference year considered 2021
Historical data 2018 – 2021
Forecast period 2022 – 2029
Quantitative units Revenue in USD Million and CAGR from 2022 to 2029
Segments Covered Types, applications, end users, and more.
Report cover Revenue Forecast, Business Ranking, Competitive Landscape, Growth Factors and Trends
Regional scope North America, Europe, Asia-Pacific, Latin America, Middle East and Africa
Scope of customization Free report customization (equivalent to up to 8 analyst business days) with purchase. Added or changed country, region and segment scope.
Pricing and purchase options Take advantage of personalized purchasing options to meet your exact research needs. Explore purchase options

Regional Underwater Photography Drones Market Analysis can be represented as follows:

Each regional Underwater Photography Drones industry is carefully researched to understand its current and future growth scenarios. This helps players strengthen their position. Use market research to get a better perspective and understanding of the market and target audience and ensure you stay ahead of the competition.

Based on geography, the global underwater photography drone market has been segmented as follows:

    • North America includes the United States, Canada and Mexico
    • Europe includes Germany, France, UK, Italy, Spain
    • South America includes Colombia, Argentina, Nigeria and Chile
    • Asia Pacific includes Japan, China, Korea, India, Saudi Arabia and Southeast Asia

For more information or query or customization before buying, visit @ https://www.marketresearchintellect.com/product/global-underwater-photography-drones-market-size-and-forecast/

About Us: Market Research Intellect

Market Research Intellect provides syndicated and customized research reports to clients from various industries and organizations, in addition to the goal of providing customized and in-depth research studies. range of industries including energy, technology, manufacturing and construction, chemicals and materials, food and beverage. etc Our research studies help our clients to make decisions based on higher data, to admit deep forecasts, to grossly capitalize with opportunities and to optimize efficiency by activating as their belt in crime to adopt a mention precise and essential without compromise. clients, we have provided expert behavior assertion research facilities to more than 100 Global Fortune 500 companies such as Amazon, Dell, IBM, Shell, Exxon Mobil, General Electric, Siemens, Microsoft, Sony and Hitachi.

Contact us:
Mr. Edwyne Fernandes
USA: +1 (650)-781-4080
UK: +44 (753)-715-0008
APAC: +61 (488)-85-9400
US toll free: +1 (800)-782-1768

Website: –https://www.marketresearchintellect.com/

]]>
Artist Simone Leigh Gets a Solo Exhibition at the 2022 Venice Biennale – Robb Report https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/artist-simone-leigh-gets-a-solo-exhibition-at-the-2022-venice-biennale-robb-report/ Sun, 13 Mar 2022 17:01:19 +0000 https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/artist-simone-leigh-gets-a-solo-exhibition-at-the-2022-venice-biennale-robb-report/ The United States Pavilion in the Giardini di Castello, home of the Venice Biennale, was erected in 1930, as fascism rose in Europe and Jim Crow laws codified white supremacy in much of the United States . When the 59th edition of the quintessential international art exhibition opens this month, Simone Leigh will be the […]]]>

The United States Pavilion in the Giardini di Castello, home of the Venice Biennale, was erected in 1930, as fascism rose in Europe and Jim Crow laws codified white supremacy in much of the United States . When the 59th edition of the quintessential international art exhibition opens this month, Simone Leigh will be the first black woman to be tasked with a solo presentation in this space, designed to showcase the best of America. The art world can’t wait.

Leigh is acclaimed for her towering figures of black women, usually sculpted in ceramic and wrapped in voluminous raffia skirts, with references ranging from Velásquez The Meninas to traditional African dwellings and Mammy’s Cupboard, a restaurant in Mississippi that could be described as blackface architecture: customers eat inside the giant brick skirt of “Aunt Jemima”. Often devoid of eyes and ears, Leigh’s women seem impervious to such racism or the vestiges of colonialism.

“If one spends a lot of time thinking about historical precedents, absences, emergencies, stories told and untold, there are layers and layers of depth to be probed in Simone Leigh’s work that are critically important,” says Jill Medvedow, director of the Institute. of Contemporary Art Boston, which proposed and organized the American entry.

Simone Leigh working on one of her sculptures.

Courtesy of the artist and Matthew Marks Gallery

Leigh’s highly anticipated show will include ceramics as well as bronzes, which were cast from her life-size models – an unusual and labor-intensive approach. But again, a theme of her work is the recognition of the historically unrecognized work of black women. “You see and feel the touch of her hand on every piece,” says Medvedow, who describes Leigh as “an artist at the peak of her power” and adds that the show’s title, Simone Leigh: Sovereignty, “just dab it with these themes of self-determination, both individual and collective.”

Medvedow says you don’t have to be an expert to be captivated by Leigh’s sculpture. “The power, the scale, the materials – the beauty – are equally compelling,” she notes. “I think his work will grab and speak to that broad audience.

]]>
Beyond Beyoncé fame, Awol Erizku expands what black art can be https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/beyond-beyonce-fame-awol-erizku-expands-what-black-art-can-be/ Thu, 10 Mar 2022 17:36:00 +0000 https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/beyond-beyonce-fame-awol-erizku-expands-what-black-art-can-be/ LOS ANGELES — Admittedly, Awol Erizku is perhaps best known for his smug photo of a pregnant Beyoncé, which in 2017 was the most liked post in Instagram history. And Erizku has taken many other memorable celebrity images, including young groundbreaking poet Amanda Gorman for the cover of Time and “Black Panther” actor Michael B. […]]]>

LOS ANGELES — Admittedly, Awol Erizku is perhaps best known for his smug photo of a pregnant Beyoncé, which in 2017 was the most liked post in Instagram history. And Erizku has taken many other memorable celebrity images, including young groundbreaking poet Amanda Gorman for the cover of Time and “Black Panther” actor Michael B. Jordan for GQ.

But in a recent interview at his sprawling studio in downtown Los Angeles, Erizku, 33 – wearing Dr Martens on his feet and a floppy hat over his dreadlocks, as Ethiopian pianist Emahoy Tsegué-Maryam Guèbrou played on the high -speakers – said he considers himself an artist first, one who also works in painting, sculpture and video installation.

“It’s something I’m adamant about,” he said. “I am not a photographer for hire.”

The desire to bring Erizku’s work to the attention of the wider art world is part of what fueled Gagosian director and curator Antwaun Sargent’s desire to give him the Park Avenue space. of the gallery for an exhibition on March 10.

“Awol is one of the black avant-garde photographers who says that limits don’t apply to the realities or the conditions in which we make images,” Sargent said. “It’s a refreshing perspective to have, especially when it comes to photography’s overwhelmingly white history.”

“How are we as an art world to ignore this?” Sargent continued. “You have photographers in Lagos, London, Johannesburg, New York and Los Angeles who create images that defy easy categorization and emphasize black desire, black beauty and black community. For me, it is significant. »

Erizku’s exhibition, ‘Memories of a Lost Sphinx’, features six photographs of light boxes in a black-painted interior with a mixed-media sculpture that reimagines the Great Sphinx of Giza as an amalgamation of Egyptian, Greek, and Egyptian influences. and Asians. There’s also a golden disco ball, “Nefertiti” – Miles Davis, in the form of the Egyptian queen.

“I deconstruct the mythological components that make up the Sphinx,” Erizku said. “It’s important to me to create confident, powerful and downright regal images of black people.”

Sargent has known Erizku since interviewing him for Complex magazine about his “The Only Way Is Up” exhibit in 2014. Erizku said he felt an immediate comfort with him, feeling “for the first times, I didn’t have to explain the work”.

Born in Ethiopia and raised in the South Bronx – Erizku describes himself as “projects” – he got into trouble in middle school and said, “Art was the only way out for me”.

A draftsman and doodler, he went to the High School of Art and Design in Manhattan, started out doing medical illustrations and took a camera to Cooper Union, where in 2010 he earned his Bachelor of Fine Arts.

During her third year at Cooper Union, Erizku riffed on Vermeer’s “Girl With a Pearl Earring,” creating the “Girl With a Bamboo Earring” photograph, featuring a black woman in a large shaped earring. of Hearts, which caught the public eye (one edition sold at Phillips Auction House in 2017 for $52,500).

From there he went to Yale, where he studied with photographer Gregory Crewdson and earned his MFA in 2014. Erizku was particularly inspired by the work of artists like Richard Prince, Jeff Wall, Roe Ethridge, Marcel Duchamp and David Hammons – “the ones who worked outside the margins,” he said.

But early on, he mastered the world of social media by treating Instagram like his gallery, selectively opening his feed to the public at set times.

In 2012, he took part in a collective exhibition at the Flag Art Foundation and then had two personal exhibitions at the now closed Hasted Kraeutler gallery in Chelsea before joining Ben Brown in London and Hong Kong and then the Night Gallery in Los Angeles. He is currently unrepresented in the United States, although he remains with Brown overseas.

“The artwork has aesthetic appeal – you want to look at it,” said collector Glenn Fuhrman, Flag founder and longtime supporter of Erizku’s artwork. “But there’s always a lot more going on below the surface.”

Some members of the art world have already noticed this. Public Art Fund, in 2017, showed Erizku’s work on Wi-Fi kiosks in the five boroughs as part of the “Commercial Break” exhibition.

In 2019, curator Allison M. Glenn included Erizku on her “Small Talk” show at the Crystal Bridges Museum in Bentonville, Ark. “The power of her practice is that she has multi-point accessibility for many different people,” Glenn mentioned. “It takes recognizable symbols and moves them around. It is the history of art. That was the paint job.

Last year, Public Art Fund featured 13 of Erizku’s photographs on bus shelters across New York and Chicago in an exhibition called “New Visions for Iris” which included a still life dealing with mass incarceration and a portrait by Michael Brown Sr.

“It’s part of a conversation about art history,” said Daniel S. Palmer, curator of the fund, “from Old Masters to contemporary imagery of our current moment.”

The Gagosian exhibit is significant, Sargent said, in part because it expands the notion of what black art can be at a time when black portraiture has become the rage of the market.

“The art world has flattened the ways Blackness works,” Sargent said. “Doing exhibitions like this helps expand beyond an overemphasis on figurative painting,” though he noted that figurative work is valid.

He added that it was a way to carry on a conversation “beyond some of the fashionable black-figure notions.”

Sargent pointed to the long-awaited recognition of black photographers such as Anthony Barboza as well as Ming Smith and the 1960s band Kamoinge, recently featured at the Whitney. “We have to use every strategy to make sure our images are seen and appreciated,” he said, “because frankly the art world didn’t care.”

Presenting Erizku in the Gagosian Park & ​​75 space — a storefront visible from the street — gives the exhibition significant accessibility. “With more black artists than ever, there is still a problem with museums and galleries attracting these audiences to see the work of members of their community,” he said. “There are a lot of barriers to getting into the art world.”

Erizku often incorporates wildlife into his images – he has photographed hip-hop star Nipsey Hussle with a horse, Michael B. Jordan with a hawk and a wolf; Gorman with a bird (now chirping in a cage near Erizku’s studio window). He said he was inspired early on by Joseph Beuys’ radical 1974 performance – ‘I love America and America loves me’ – in which the German artist spent a week in his dealer’s gallery , fenced with a live coyote.

Erizku’s labor costs are low for a major gallery owner like Gagosian, with pieces selling for between $40,000 and $60,000. But Sargent said it was essential for top-notch galleries to showcase fresh perspectives. “If we are honest in saying that we want to ensure that all voices are represented in the art world, we seriously need to provide platforms for artists who think in ways that deviate from traditional notions around the art world. creating images,” Sargent said.

To some extent, Erizku has bypassed the Guardians, given that he’s been presenting his own shows on social media for years. His main interest, said the artist, is to be able to communicate and elevate black images, whether it’s actress Viola Davis, African masks, nail salon hands, Ethiopian sex workers or basketball player Kevin Durant.

“I want to be remembered for black imagination,” Erizku said, “for pushing the boundaries of black art.”


Awol Erizku: Memories of a Lost Sphinx

March 10-April 16, Gagosian Park & ​​75, 821 Park Avenue, Manhattan. 212-796-1228; gagosian.com.

]]>
Ukrainian photographer uses TikTok to turn war zone destruction into art https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/ukrainian-photographer-uses-tiktok-to-turn-war-zone-destruction-into-art/ Thu, 10 Mar 2022 01:01:00 +0000 https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/ukrainian-photographer-uses-tiktok-to-turn-war-zone-destruction-into-art/ This is the scene that the Ukrainian photographer Valeria Shashenok witnesses every day as she walks down the street in Chernihiv, war-torn Ukraine. Shashenok takes refuge in an underground bunker with his mother, father and dog “Tory” in the northern Ukrainian city. His close friends have already fled. But instead of wallowing in the destruction […]]]>
This is the scene that the Ukrainian photographer Valeria Shashenok witnesses every day as she walks down the street in Chernihiv, war-torn Ukraine. Shashenok takes refuge in an underground bunker with his mother, father and dog “Tory” in the northern Ukrainian city. His close friends have already fled.

But instead of wallowing in the destruction that surrounds him, Shashenok has turned war into art.

Shashenok uses TikTok to document his daily life. His videos have gone viral, with some getting millions of views.

In the video that made her famous, Shashenok dances to “Che La Luna” with the caption “My typical day in a bomb shelter.” She uses a heat gun as a hair dryer while her dog hides under a blanket. Her mother cooks in a pot on the floor.

In another video, Shashenok stands in front of a pile of rubble. The caption reads: “Today Putin destroyed one of the old buildings in my town. It was a cinema that survived WWII.” Then she points to large windows nearby, broken glass on the floor. “The windows also blew out due to the force of the impact in nearby houses.”

In yet another, she shows the bare shelves of a grocery store with the caption: “If you want to buy food from a supermarket during the war in Ukraine.”

When asked by CNN’s Pamela Brown on Sunday why she started posting these videos on Tik Tok, Shashenok said, “I think it’s like my mission to show people what it’s like in real life. This is real life, and here I am.”

She continued: “A lot of Russians write to me that we are with you. … In Russia (there is) a lot of fake news. And most people don’t believe that in my country we have a war. . .. My mission (is) to show (to) the whole world that this is happening now in real life, and you can now see (the) war (o)n Tik Tok.”

Tik Tok announced on Sunday that it would suspend certain features in Russia in light of the country’s new “fake news” law criminalizing misinformation.
But even with growing fame, Shashenok worries about the fate of his country. “Every day I live with the hope that tomorrow the war will end, but everything gets worse.” Shachenok wrote to CNN’s Meanwhile in America on Sunday. On Monday, she wrote to CNN, “Everyone is scared (for) their life.”

In recent days, hopes of opening safe evacuation corridors for civilians out of a number of towns, including Chernihiv, have been repeatedly dashed, with Ukraine accusing Russia of attacking the routes of evacuation.

Like many people in Ukraine, Shashenok’s family is reluctant to leave as evidence of Russian violence against Ukrainian civilians mounts. Asked by CNN on Monday if she and her family would try to flee during a planned ceasefire, Shashenok said, “If Russian troops don’t kill civilians tomorrow, yes, I will go on (the) 9 ( Of March.” Questioned again on Tuesday, Shashenok said her family had no plans to leave the bunker yet.

Even with the fear of encroaching on Russia’s violence, Shashenok still has big dreams. She told CNN on Monday that Tik Tok is now her future.

“Maybe I (could) come (to) the United States and work as a Tik Tok reporter,” she said.

The hope for a new life and a fresh start is what keeps Shashenok going. “People have to value freedom. It’s the most important (thing) we have.”

]]>
Photographer’s family stuck in Ukraine | Local https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/photographers-family-stuck-in-ukraine-local/ Wed, 02 Mar 2022 22:45:00 +0000 https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/photographers-family-stuck-in-ukraine-local/ DAILY ELKO ELKO – Local artists have set up a fund to help a photographer get his wife and children out of war-torn Ukraine. Irakli Dzneladze is one of two photographers from the Republic of Georgia who exhibited their work at the Northeastern Nevada Museum in 2019. He and his family have since moved to […]]]>

DAILY ELKO

ELKO – Local artists have set up a fund to help a photographer get his wife and children out of war-torn Ukraine.

Irakli Dzneladze is one of two photographers from the Republic of Georgia who exhibited their work at the Northeastern Nevada Museum in 2019. He and his family have since moved to Ukraine, although he was in Georgia when war broke out. last week.

“The situation is very difficult,” Dzneladze wrote to Cynthia Delaney via Facebook Messenger on February 25. “My family met the New Year in (Republic of) Georgia. I built a house in the village and I plan to start an art residency this year. But Putin changed everything. My family is in Ukraine, I’m stuck in Georgia. My girls were in a bomb shelter last night and in the morning.

The girls, aged 6 and 8, are still in Shepetovka, a town in central Ukraine, with their mother.

Delaney said many local residents befriended Dzneladze and Giorgi Nakashidze in the summer of 2019 when they were invited to show their work at the museum.

People also read…

“They had never traveled outside of Europe, so coming to the United States was a really big honor for them,” Delaney said. “They flew to Las Vegas just to see it. Elkoans picked them up and escorted them to our town. Both were special guests here and treated like royalty. They toured the city, dined at the Star, visited local ranches, attended the fair and horse races, and marveled at our way of life.

The trip was sponsored by Jonas and Betsy Dovydenas, longtime friends and patrons of the museum, which has a permanent collection of photographs by Jonas.

“They brought gifts of Georgian wine and other generous offerings,” Delaney said. “The grand finale of the whole tour was a trip to Burning Man, a lifelong dream for Dzneladze.”

Dzneladze’s wife is Ukrainian and they decided to move there last year for work reasons. It seemed like a great opportunity.

Fast forward to last week and the story took a bitter turn.

“I have Covid and am waiting when I get better and arrive in Poland,” Dzneladze wrote last Friday. He has since recovered and has a ticket on March 3 to a city in Poland. From there he will try to arrange safe transportation for his family. He has no idea how much it will cost him.

“I don’t know how to convey what is happening,” Dzneladze said. “The price of a ticket to Poland is $1,000, there is no gas and there are over 200,000 people at the border.”

“The only thing for me is to rejoin my family and take care of our lives and then hopefully everything will be fine little by little.”

Meanwhile, friends Catherine Wines, Simone Turner and Delaney helped set up an emergency fund at Elko Federal Credit Union.

Anyone can help by going to the Elko Federal Credit Union and donating to the “Help Irakli Donation Account”. They can also call the bank at 775-750-4501 or send money to Elko Federal Credit Union, 2397 Mountain City Highway, Elko, NV 89801.

All funds received will be directly transferred to Deznaldze’s Bank of Georgia account which he will have access to during his stay in Poland.

“Please help this Ukrainian/Georgian family,” Delaney said.

]]>
The CCP and the Phoenix Art Museum host a Japanese exhibition devoted to historical and contemporary photography https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/the-ccp-and-the-phoenix-art-museum-host-a-japanese-exhibition-devoted-to-historical-and-contemporary-photography/ Wed, 02 Mar 2022 08:03:10 +0000 https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/the-ccp-and-the-phoenix-art-museum-host-a-japanese-exhibition-devoted-to-historical-and-contemporary-photography/ University of Arizona Creative Photography Centeras part of its historic collaboration with the Phoenix Art Museumprovides unprecedented insight into how post-World War II Japanese photographers attempted to counter their government’s propaganda. With 87 photographs preserved over many years, the Phoenix Art Museum hosts the exhibition “Farewell to Photography: The Hitachi Collection of Postwar Japanese Photographs, […]]]>

University of Arizona Creative Photography Centeras part of its historic collaboration with the Phoenix Art Museumprovides unprecedented insight into how post-World War II Japanese photographers attempted to counter their government’s propaganda.

With 87 photographs preserved over many years, the Phoenix Art Museum hosts the exhibition “Farewell to Photography: The Hitachi Collection of Postwar Japanese Photographs, 1961 to 1989” until mid-summer.

Dr. Audrey Sands, assistant curator of photography for the Norton family, spoke about the upcoming exhibit.

“We have a responsibility as a cultural institution to reflect the incredible diversity of our audiences,” said Dr Sands.

MORE DAILY WILDCAT

The Hitachi collection is one of three annual photography exhibitions hosted by the Phoenix Art Museum, drawing from the CCP’s unrivaled collection of historic and contemporary photography.

The Hitachi images of post-World War II Japanese photographers attempt to change the narrative their country published after the war. In one image, a flock of birds sits on a tree, as three elderly men stand outside a doorway, a couple close their eyes as they smoke with the silhouette of a man walking down a hallway.

“These photographers were against traditional practices and what was traditionally accepted by the art world, the photographic world, and government-sanctioned practices,” Sands said. “They inspired a whole generation of artists. I think that’s a real lesson: think outside of the boundaries you inherit.

The origins of the exhibition began in 1988 when the CCP set out to acquire works by contemporary photographers in post-World War II Japan through grants from the Hitachi Corporation. After recovering these photographs, the UA Center collaborated with the Phoenix Art Museum to present the collection in the state of Arizona.

Sands said she hopes the exhibit will expand and challenge the worldview and perspectives of visitors to the Southwestern United States. As part of the team that brought together the PCC and the Phoenix Art Museum for the exhibition, it was important to present the parallels of post-war Japan. and the present day.

The post-war government in Japan soon used the medium of photography as a propaganda tool. The government’s documentary style sent a message to Japanese citizens that what they were seeing was the only truth they needed to heed.

“These photographers meant that all photography is manipulation and distortion,” Sands said.

RELATED: The Center for Creative Photography introduces digital viewing during the pandemic

The Japanese were also dealing with the consequences of the American military occupation and the influx of Western culture that impacted and distorted Japanese culture to the point where these photographers wondered, “What is national identity?” »

The photograph “New couple who closed their eyes, Tokyo,showing a couple taken together in the middle of a shot, their eyes closed, smoking, is an example of distancing from the expected complacency and highlighting a new approach to photography.

“It symbolizes this moment in photography, signaling a totally new approach to vision. It alludes to a kind of beyond and a refusal to meet gazes and suggests that photography can be a screen between two worlds. There is a kind of surrealism in this image,” Sands said.

Other photographic techniques that grew out of the resistance against government propaganda were to shoot higher angles and boost contrast for grain in black and white photos. One of the biggest that is featured in the exhibition is the are-bure-boke, translated as “rough, blurry and blurry”, which can be seen in the photo “Ishikawamon, Kanazawaas a group of crows perched atop many branches with a dim light behind them.

“All of the exhibits are the result of collaborative work between so many individuals in the museums,” Sands said. “It was not just my work that entered the exhibition, but the collective work of my many colleagues at CCP and the Phoenix Art Museum.”


*El Inde Arizona is a news service of the University of Arizona School of Journalism.


Follow the Daily Wildcat on Twitter


]]>
U.S. Embassy and Doha Women Forum to Host Workshop on “Empowerment Through Music” https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/u-s-embassy-and-doha-women-forum-to-host-workshop-on-empowerment-through-music/ Mon, 28 Feb 2022 07:03:00 +0000 https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/u-s-embassy-and-doha-women-forum-to-host-workshop-on-empowerment-through-music/ Doha: Critically acclaimed artist and songwriter Maya Azucena will lead an empowering workshop, “Unleash Your Power Through Music”, at Centara West Bay Residences & Suites. The workshop will feature songs and storytelling, demonstrating the power of music in transforming our lives. The workshop, organized by the Doha Women Forum, in collaboration with the US Embassy […]]]>

Doha: Critically acclaimed artist and songwriter Maya Azucena will lead an empowering workshop, “Unleash Your Power Through Music”, at Centara West Bay Residences & Suites.

The workshop will feature songs and storytelling, demonstrating the power of music in transforming our lives. The workshop, organized by the Doha Women Forum, in collaboration with the US Embassy in Qatar, will take place on Wednesday, March 2 at 6 p.m. It is one of the many initiatives of the Doha Women Forum to promote the health and well-being of women and young people in Qatar.

American artist Maya Azucena fuses indie-pop and contemporary rhythm and blues (R&B), along with passionate blues-inspired vocals, to create music that uplifts the soul. Azucena is well known for her humanitarian vision and global projects. Based on a personal commitment to having a positive impact on society through his talent, most of Azucena’s songs are anthems that give voice to self-esteem, the empowerment of women and young people, the overcome obstacles and step into our fearless selves.

Natalie A Baker, Chargé d’Affaires at the U.S. Embassy in Qatar, said, “We are thrilled to welcome Maya Azucena to the Middle East for the first time and to work with local grassroots movements to light women in music and empowerment. This workshop with the Doha Women Forum allows everyone to find common ground through music, storytelling and self-expression.

Doha Women Forum Founder Conchita Ponce said, “It is a great pleasure to be able to organize a workshop that aims to transform our lives and increase our self-esteem using music. Maya Azucena is a wonderful performer who aims to empower women and young people by focusing on finding and expressing their voice.

Azucena said she was looking forward to visiting Qatar for the first time and helping attendees discover their superpower. Rivage Qatar representative, Linda Vorkale, said, “The Rivage Qatar team is delighted to support the upcoming workshop on music as a means of bringing about positive change and impacting society.

The Maya Azucena tour is organized by the United States Embassy in Qatar and the workshop is sponsored by Centara West Bay Residences & Suites and Rivage Skincare – Natural Dead Sea Minerals.

Registration for Unleash Your Power Through Music with Maya Azucena is available through Eventbrite.

]]>
Eminem, Dr. Dre and Mary J. Blige back in Billboard Artist 100 Top 10 – Billboard https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/eminem-dr-dre-and-mary-j-blige-back-in-billboard-artist-100-top-10-billboard/ Wed, 23 Feb 2022 17:41:41 +0000 https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/eminem-dr-dre-and-mary-j-blige-back-in-billboard-artist-100-top-10-billboard/ The Weeknd has a 27th week at No. 1 on the Billboard Artist 100 (dated February 26), remaining the top musical group in the United States, while Eminem, Dr. Dre and Mary J. Blige all return to the top 10 in the standings after their performances at the 2022 Super Bowl halftime on Feb. 13. […]]]>

The Weeknd has a 27th week at No. 1 on the Billboard Artist 100 (dated February 26), remaining the top musical group in the United States, while Eminem, Dr. Dre and Mary J. Blige all return to the top 10 in the standings after their performances at the 2022 Super Bowl halftime on Feb. 13.

To explore

See the latest videos, graphics and news

See the latest videos, graphics and news

Hits from The Weeknd LP The strong points ranks 5th on the Billboard 200 with 33,000 equivalent album units, according to MRC Data, while his latest album, Dawn FM, ranks at No. 11 (28,000 units). Additionally, his 2011 mixtape balloon house debuted at No. 113 (10,000 units) following its vinyl re-release; it also starts at No. 4 on Vinyl Albums (6,000 copies sold on vinyl) and No. 10 on Best Selling Albums (7,000 sold overall).

The Weeknd also landed four songs on the latest Billboard Hot 100, led by former No. 1 “Save Your Tears,” featuring Ariana Grande, now at No. 18.

Since the Artist 100 launched in 2014, only Taylor Swift (50 weeks) and Drake (36) have spent more time at No. 1 than The Weeknd.

Eminem jumps from No. 32 to No. 4 on the Artist 100 following his Super Bowl spotlight, during which he performed “Lose Yourself.” His 2002-03 Hot 100 No. 1 12-week Hot 100 re-enters the chart at No. 40, up 106% to 7.9 million streams and 1,153% to 19,000 downloads sold. It last appeared on the chart in March 2003.

Eminem also landed four albums on the Billboard 200, punctuated by Reminder: successeswhich roars 126-8 (31,000 units, up 256%).

Dr. Dre also returns to the top 10 of the Artist 100, up 50-5, thanks to his halftime performance, while his LP Dr. Dre – 2001 climbs 108-9 on the Billboard 200 (30,000 units, up 219%), breaking into the top 10 for the first time since May 2000. Additionally, his hits “Still DRE” and “The Next Episode” – both with Snoop Dogg – re-entering the Hot 100 at numbers 23 and 37, respectively. The former far exceeds its initial record of No. 93 in 1999; the latter reached #23 in 2000.

Blige also revisits the top 10 of the Artist 100, exploding 92-7, following his halftime show and the arrival of his new album, Hello beauty. The LP debuted at No. 14 on the Billboard 200 with 25,000 units, while its title track bowed to No. 83 on the Hot 100, where it was its first entry as a lead artist since April 2012.

The Artist 100 measures artist activity across key music consumption metrics, blending album and track sales, radio airplay and streaming to provide a weekly multidimensional ranking of artist popularity .

]]>
Dry cleaners close as coronavirus pandemic drags on https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/dry-cleaners-close-as-coronavirus-pandemic-drags-on/ Tue, 22 Feb 2022 13:01:02 +0000 https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/dry-cleaners-close-as-coronavirus-pandemic-drags-on/ “All they had left was not enough to give us a big boost,” Gary, 61, said of the extra customers as he swept the tiled floor of his gutted storefront on East Glebe Road last month. “It’s just an example of the state of affairs. When people don’t go to work, they don’t bring clothes.” […]]]>

“All they had left was not enough to give us a big boost,” Gary, 61, said of the extra customers as he swept the tiled floor of his gutted storefront on East Glebe Road last month. “It’s just an example of the state of affairs. When people don’t go to work, they don’t bring clothes.”

Two metal shelves containing washed shirts and pants were still near the window, where a paper sign summed up their fate: “Notice: store closed.”

Nearly two years after the pandemic changed daily life, the divergent economic consequences for small businesses in Northern Virginia and beyond are familiar: There are the moms and pops who made it through and those who couldn’t get out of it. Entrepreneurs who have found a way to pivot — to contactless “ghost kitchens” or online-only yoga — and family outfits are still praying for some sort of return to normalcy.

Auburn Cleaners was firmly in the latter camp until the omicron variant of the coronavirus and its staggering number of cases delayed a return to the office. The blazers and blouses would sit inside the closets for a few more months, and the Whitesides decided that was it: they would leave the storefront where they and a handful of employees had been cleaning, ironing and packing since the couple had bought it in the early 1990s.

It was another dry cleaner lost to the coronavirus – the third casualty in a stretch of about eight blocks and a much bigger omen for an industry that may never recover. Some trade groups expect that, by December, 30% of dry cleaning businesses operating before the pandemic will have closed.

In the DC area and other major metropolitan areas, dry cleaning has long been considered a middle-class vehicle for immigrant families, many of whom were Korean Americans who settled here in the 1970s to 1990s, according to industry experts. There were low barriers to entry and a limited need for language skills, not to mention a community of other store owners who were often willing to help with loans and training.

But even before the pandemic, many of these independent stores were preparing for change: their American-born children were choosing not to take over the family business, opting instead for white-collar fields. Even in Washington, offices were relaxing their standards for business attire and reducing the need for professional cleaning.

“At one point, you had a casual Friday and then moved on to a casual daily,” said Mary Scalco, chief executive of the Drycleaning & Laundry Institute, a business group based in Prince George’s County. “A lot of them have repositioned themselves as convenience stores and embraced a broader range of clothing – it’s your golf shirts, polo shirts, khakis, not just your ties and suits.”

For the Whitesides, however, it was simply a matter of following the multiple generations of customers who passed through the store – everyone from first responders and hotel workers to a US congressman whom Gary declined to name. . (“He’s been in the news a bit and got some criticism, and I don’t want people to know he lives in that area,” he said.)

Chong Whitesides, who immigrated to the United States from Korea as a teenager, had grown up working in his family’s dry cleaning shops and stayed in the business while Gary worked in telecommunications at a base in the US Army in Maryland.

After moving to Northern Virginia in the early 1990s, she decided to start her own business. The couple bought the Auburn Cleaners store on East Glebe, a neighborhood mainstay on a block full of longtime establishments.

It quickly became a family affair: their son Jeremy, now a computer programmer, worked his way up to George Mason University. When Gary was laid off from his IT job during the Great Recession, he joined her – a ploy to get them to spend more time together.

But the work weeks were 70 hours. With the exception of Sundays and a few holidays, one of them was almost always at the store – labeling the clothes, checking for stains, pre-cleaning, staining and ironing, then sorting and packing.

There would be seasonal rhythms: spring meant ball gowns and wedding dresses; fall was for coats and sweaters. But “other than very general seasonal things,” he said, “it’s a month-to-month crapshoot.”

The number of dry cleaners remained relatively stable in Alexandria during the first half of the pandemic, according to the city’s economic development data, dropping from 54 in January 2019 to 50 in the same period last year. But trade groups warn the worst is yet to come.

Peter Blake, executive director of the Mid-Atlantic Association of Cleaners, which represents 350 storefronts in the district, Maryland, Virginia and West Virginia, said the number of closed outlets — about 10 to 15% of industry – could double by the end of the year.

He said his group had also encouraged its members to diversify their businesses, tapping into laundry and folding and delivery services that could appeal to customers who had few shirts to iron when they started working from home. .

But as the original coronavirus gave way to the delta variant, which gave way to the omicron, the outlook for the Whitesides was bleak.

They closed their store for a few weeks and then reopened – with slightly limited hours – to serve the regular trickle of first responders and other frontline workers who arrived during the summer of 2020. But business this year- there have never reached more than a quarter of what it was before the pandemic.

“There were all these different edicts — which can stay open and which can close — that were all undetermined for a while,” he said. “At one point it didn’t really matter because no one was coming out anyway.”

Auburn Cleaners received two rounds of loans under the Paycheck Protection Program, which “are enough to keep us going for a while,” Gary said. (Some other companies have relied on a special tax credit that was phased out in a federal infrastructure package last year, though industry groups are pushing for it to be extended through March.)

The Whitesides dipped into their savings. They made calculations. They had customers hooked – and still do, even though they moved some operations completely out of a storefront.

But the rest of their clientele, he fears, will simply never return.

]]>
Life in Our Foothills 2022 – Margaret Curtis, Visual Artist and Painter – The Tryon Daily Bulletin https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/life-in-our-foothills-2022-margaret-curtis-visual-artist-and-painter-the-tryon-daily-bulletin/ Mon, 21 Feb 2022 19:09:16 +0000 https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/life-in-our-foothills-2022-margaret-curtis-visual-artist-and-painter-the-tryon-daily-bulletin/ The unconventional process of creativity Margaret Curtis, visual artist and painter Erin Boggs Story Few people know how far an artist will go to find the right tools to create their work. In fact, the tools and process themselves can be just as creative as the finished work. When Margaret Curtis started out as a […]]]>

The unconventional process of creativity

Margaret Curtis, visual artist and painter

Erin Boggs Story

Few people know how far an artist will go to find the right tools to create their work. In fact, the tools and process themselves can be just as creative as the finished work.

When Margaret Curtis started out as a young painter in New York, her tools of choice were cake decorating tools. Recently, she also used cleaning gloves and a balloon to create ice shapes and study light. The result of this experience is his 2019 painting “The Ice Sculpture”.

Thanks to the use of unconventional tools, her finished work is not always what she originally had in mind when she started. In many cases, the process itself takes over and ultimately determines the finished part.

“I’ve painted enough to know that light reflection and shadows are often very counter-intuitive. I knew something as complex as an entire monster figure made out of ice would be a really complicated thing to paint. So I decided to build my own ice sculpture body model. I made a little red house out of construction paper, went out to my driveway and took a bunch of pictures. Time and time again the house is refracted through her body and I love that as a metaphor,” says Margaret. “It’s the image of a monstrous ice sculpture melting in the sun. Behind it is a small red ranch house. He is very attractive. It has all the reflections of the house all over its body and there is a mother and several children trying to stop it from melting, ”says Margaret.

When creating her art, Margaret says “I really think about how our psychology and our human minds create our family structures, our intimate relationships and our society as well.”

Raised in Tennessee, Margaret attended Duke University. She didn’t major in art, but finished all her course requirements early and did what she wanted in her senior year. “So I just started taking art classes. I absolutely loved it. From there I went to Atlanta College of Art because I knew I didn’t have enough portfolio or experience to apply for an MFA So I got my BFA in Atlanta and then in my early twenties I got a really wonderful scholarship to Yale Summer School of Art and Music in Connecticut which was extremely educational for me.The program was intense, but the teachers instilled valuable self-critical skills in it.

The program included 30 students from the United States and abroad. They brought in very important New York artists at the time, like Ross Bleckner and Louise Fishman, to critique the students’ work. Around this time, Margaret began to take herself a bit more seriously in terms of creating art. Today, she still maintains close friendships with some of her classmates in the program.

After the program ended, youthful idealism collided with reality.

“I had a lot of anger when I left. The program was very precise in its structure, and it was not nice. Criticism nowadays, even if it is difficult to hear, is formulated in a more constructive way. We all left kinda blindsided. I think their whole philosophy was to break us all down and rebuild us. I just moved to New York after that and said I was gonna give myself five, sink or swim. A lot of the work I was doing in the beginning was really a reaction to the Yale summer program. I was so mad and I just thought, what’s the most heinous thing I could do that would be completely contrary to what my teachers were trying to teach me, something they would never take seriously, so she started using cake decorating tools and created floral, frilly, and very decorative paintings.

Born of this rebellion, she quickly became the trendy young girl in New York for several years. She got her first big break in 1993 thanks to Marcia Tucker, the first female curator of the Whitney Museum of American Art, when Tucker opened her own museum.

An artist in any creative field often becomes one as a way to make sense of competing ideas in their mind and as a way to express their experiences, thoughts, and feelings. Often the finished work is quite disruptive or even controversial.

Margaret’s work covers many themes – vulnerability, anxiety, narcissism, tension, nature, climate change, current events, power dynamics between men and women, in society and our daily personal lives.

“Portrait of My Anxiety” (2021) is about someone who literally cares about worrying about the challenges and difficulties we all face in today’s world. “I try to keep my work complex and I try to keep it very open reading, because people bring their own experience into the viewing process and that’s great,” she says.

Margaret also says “I don’t really believe in style. My paintings will take any form necessary to express the idea I am trying to convey. Sometimes I use a realistic trompe l’oeil style and faux finish,” skills she developed during her first job in New York. “Some of them are much more expressionist. The ice sculpture is not at all what I thought it would look like in my mind, but through the process it created itself.

“There are a lot of misconceptions people have about the artistic process. They think you just painted out of your head. But our brains don’t really work that way. There are all kinds of things that happen when you really move past what your brain tells you you should see and start looking at what’s actually in front of you. This is where the magic lies. So you have to be engaged with the physical world in order to really understand that. I strongly believe that artists should give themselves as much information as possible about what they are working with,” says Margaret.

Even the paint itself can transform the appearance of the finished product. “I love painting and my work is very layered, almost geological. There is a lot of relief on the canvas. Cake decorating tools are used to spread thick drops of paint, and the paint is woven, like braided icing.

Margaret and her husband moved to Tryon from New York in 2008, to be closer to medical care for their eldest son. She says of Tryon, “It’s across the mountains I grew up in, in Tennessee, and it reminds me a lot of my hometown. We were impressed that a town of this size had a theater with a film company, a café, five bookstores at the time and a contemporary art space. Tryon has a lot of culture for a small place,” says Margaret.

After moving here and a six-year hiatus, she had to rebuild her career from the ground up. “Coming here and starting all over again, seeing that my work is still meaningful and the work is in demand, doing it twice, I feel so much more confident in what I’m doing now. I want the slow build, I don’t want the ‘hip thing’,” Margaret says.There are a number of artists working in the Tryon community and she really enjoys their company.

Recently, the Joan Mitchell Foundation awarded a scholarship to Margaret. Joan Mitchell was part of the first generation of abstractionists like Jackson Pollock and Willem de Kooning. She and other female abstract expressionist painters of this time were not taken seriously and she eventually moved to Paris. “She’s taken seriously now but, in her day, it was hard for them to get shows and hard for them to get decent, unbiased reviews,” Margaret says. The foundation that Mitchell created was specifically aimed at helping living and working artists overcome any barriers that prevent them from creating art, and generously supports those who are awarded. An artist must be nominated to apply. Margaret was nominated the first time around and didn’t get it, but was renamed this time around and selected. “I was thrilled to have someone at the national level put my name in the hat,” says Margaret.

As a result of this award, she is currently expanding her art studio and says emotionally it really helped unify her early career with her more recent work.

To see more works by Margaret Curtis, visit https://margaretcurtisart.com

]]>