san francisco – David Hemmings Bird Photography http://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/ Fri, 04 Mar 2022 18:24:45 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-2021-06-25T155134.587.png san francisco – David Hemmings Bird Photography http://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/ 32 32 Photographer captures bizarre robbery turned food fight at California Walgreens https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/photographer-captures-bizarre-robbery-turned-food-fight-at-california-walgreens/ Fri, 04 Mar 2022 18:19:00 +0000 https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/photographer-captures-bizarre-robbery-turned-food-fight-at-california-walgreens/ SAN FRANCISCO — A bizarre and brazen robbery that turned into a food fight at a Walgreens in San Francisco has been caught on camera. In cellphone video shared with our sister station, KGO-TV, recorded by professional photographer Nicholas Stennet, you can see two Walgreens employees behind the counter, trying to call for help as […]]]>
SAN FRANCISCO — A bizarre and brazen robbery that turned into a food fight at a Walgreens in San Francisco has been caught on camera.

In cellphone video shared with our sister station, KGO-TV, recorded by professional photographer Nicholas Stennet, you can see two Walgreens employees behind the counter, trying to call for help as a man dressed in black fills a large bag with items.

“We have this person who…takes everything at the counter,” an employee says over the phone.

Stennet has witnessed these crimes before but never planned to step in to record, especially after he said the suspect dropped the phone of a man trying to record moments earlier.

“He goes behind the counter taking stuff, maybe COVID tests, a tray of batteries, electronics.”

Several store employees watched, waiting for help to arrive. Meanwhile, the suspect, with stunning calm, selects items to place in his bag.

“I feel bad for the workers,” Stennet says.

At one point, another customer tried to intervene, challenging the suspect with “what, you wanna go?”

The suspect then grabbed bunches of bananas and threw them at the customer.

“There are bananas flambé everywhere!” Stennet exclaims.

When the customer tried to fight back, reaching for more bananas, you can hear a store clerk say “no, no, no, no!” to try to defuse the situation. The customer ignored the request and returned the bananas.

WATCH: Thief steals trash bag full of SF Walgreens items with security shoot in plain sight

“The guy (the suspect) then comes back with Chips Ahoy to send back to him!” Stennet exclaims.

Jim Rita is a former California law enforcement officer and president of SRS Protection, which provides security for businesses and places of worship in five states.

He says maintaining security in California… is difficult.

“There are several states we work in where security guards are allowed to do their jobs. In the good old days, we could handcuff them, take them behind their backs, and call the cops. The store would sue.”

Rita does not recommend that viewers confront a suspect in flagrante delicto.

“We also don’t want the citizen to be hurt, I know it’s frustrating.”

Although he thinks if the video can be taken safely, as Stennet did, it may help law enforcement.

“If there’s no gun, I’m not afraid of bananas and Chips Ahoy!” beams Stennet who continues: “If I can raise a little awareness and help the lawsuits, that would be good.”

Copyright © 2022 KGO-TV. All rights reserved.

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A professor talks about the COVID-19 outbreak and his inspiration for photography – The Connection https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/a-professor-talks-about-the-covid-19-outbreak-and-his-inspiration-for-photography-the-connection/ Thu, 27 Jan 2022 01:58:45 +0000 https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/a-professor-talks-about-the-covid-19-outbreak-and-his-inspiration-for-photography-the-connection/ Professor Patty Felkner was worried and uncertain about her photography lessons when the COVID-19 outbreak hit.Felkner, who was a professor of photography at Cosumnes River College for 30 years, prides herself on being a happy person in life because she can do what she loves as a profession and is able to share that love. […]]]>

Professor Patty Felkner was worried and uncertain about her photography lessons when the COVID-19 outbreak hit.
Felkner, who was a professor of photography at Cosumnes River College for 30 years, prides herself on being a happy person in life because she can do what she loves as a profession and is able to share that love. with his students.
In March 2020, Felkner and his colleague took their beginner photography classes to San Francisco for a field trip. Weird talk about the bus ride home grew among students about the coronavirus, as they weren’t sure if the outbreak would affect them.
Upon returning home, the CRC announced that they had to close in-person classes as it was unsafe for them to continue due to the coronavirus outbreak. This forced all classes to be taught online overnight.
“He just stopped and it was so immediate,” Felkner said. “I was so worried about my family and my students.”
Felkner’s voice had become a little shaky as he thought back to the start of the closings. “I was terrified,” she said.
“She always saw the good in people,” said photography professor Kathryn Mayo, who has been a colleague of Felkner at CRC for 14 years.
Mayo said she admired Felkner for who she was as a colleague and a person and always had a big smile when talking about her.
“I was able to learn so many things working with her,” Mayo said. “I see her not only as a colleague, but also as a mentor and a friend.”
Mayo said she felt she had the right partner to tackle the challenges they would face in remote learning with Felkner’s experience and vision for how students can learn.
One of the many students Felkner has touched is Neezy Jeffery, who majors in photography and has known Felkner since the spring of 2020.
Jeffery is a former student of Felkner and is now his teaching assistant. She said she chose to be Felkner’s nanny because she had a lot of gratitude and respect for her.
Jeffery got to experience both how Felkner teaches before and during the pandemic.
“She went above and beyond in that moment,” Jeffery said. She also said she thought Felkner was always open to her students and always made sure they were okay and learning to the best of their abilities.
“She doesn’t just treat you like a student, she treats you like a person,” Jeffery said. “She treats you like you’re an artist and that’s something you don’t really get going.”
Felkner said his love for photography started with his father, as he was an amateur photographer with a camera.
“He had a camera and I followed him around and eventually he let me use it and so I got really into photography when I was in high school,” she said. “But it had to do with him and his love for him.”
Felkner said the students are what make CRC special for her.
“We have a lot of diversity both ethnically, culturally, age and disability, CRC seems like such an open place,” Felkner said. “I learned so much from my students.”
She also said that her colleagues are also what makes the school special.
“A lot of people who complain about their jobs complain because they don’t really like the people they work with,” Felkner said. “But for me, I really like the people I work with and so it’s also a lot of fun to be at work.”
Most CRC in-person classes will remain online to begin the spring semester until February 22. Felkner said she understands the decision to push back in-person classes due to the recent spike in COVID cases in the Sacramento area, but looks forward to returning to class with her students in the safest way possible.

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Bruce Lee 3D art pays homage to iconic martial artist https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/bruce-lee-3d-art-pays-homage-to-iconic-martial-artist/ Sun, 09 Jan 2022 19:57:00 +0000 https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/bruce-lee-3d-art-pays-homage-to-iconic-martial-artist/ Two 3D images offer a whole new take on one of the world’s most beloved celebrities and martial arts stars, Bruce Lee, aka The Dragon. Iconic martial artist and movie star Bruce lee was honored with two new 3D artwork. From the very early stages of his remarkable but ultimately short-lived career, Lee was impossible […]]]>


Two 3D images offer a whole new take on one of the world’s most beloved celebrities and martial arts stars, Bruce Lee, aka The Dragon.

Iconic martial artist and movie star Bruce lee was honored with two new 3D artwork. From the very early stages of his remarkable but ultimately short-lived career, Lee was impossible to ignore. Although born in San Francisco, Lee spent most of his childhood in Hong Kong before returning to the United States with the dream of succeeding as a martial arts teacher. Eventually, he developed a new style of martial arts which he called Jeet Kune Do, whose tastes were based on a hybrid of kung fu and street fighting techniques.

Over time, Lee achieved his goal of teaching martial arts to anyone keen to learn, a business that drew criticism from fellow Chinese practitioners who thought Lee shouldn’t be teaching the skills to non-students. Chinese. After overcoming this hurdle with his typical flair and perseverance, Lee continued to gain recognition in Hollywood, but he soon found that breaking down the racial and cultural barriers of the film and television industry of the time was not an easy task. Frustrated by the limitations placed on him, Lee decided to accept an offer to make a martial arts film in Hong Kong. As it found rapid success in this film industry, Hollywood’s interest was piqued. Sadly, Lee’s life and career were cut short when he passed away suddenly in 1973 at the age of 32.

VIDEO OF THE DAY

Related: Why Bruce Lee Didn’t Like Traditional Kung Fu

In the years since Lee’s untimely death, his fame and recognition have reached astonishing levels. Although he never had the chance to truly make a movie career in Hollywood, the Chinese-American movie star is arguably the most instantly recognized celebrity in the world today. Next year marks the 50e anniversary of his death and while this date will undoubtedly elicit many tributes to Lee’s life and career, fans have always appreciated and excelled in creating tributes to Lee no matter what time or place . The latest example is of impressive 3D artwork, courtesy of artist @rafagrassetti. Check out the two captivating works below:


Click here to see the original publication

Click here to see the original publication

Obviously, the legend of Bruce Lee will continue to be an exciting topic for many no matter the time. The sheer volume of memories and tributes paid to the late star is a stunning testament to this fame. Yet at the same time, Lee’s staunch devotees go far beyond mere fans of his films expressing their gratitude. Perhaps this is because the martial arts star expressed philosophies about life and self-confidence that came to be completely sincere and not flippant or pretentious. Lee was a celebrity who didn’t behave like a celebrity was supposed to behave, and his unique talents were as endearing as he was.


Three-dimensional art like the one above serves to keep a certain image of Bruce lee alive – an image that has been around for decades and still looks so fresh. It is truly remarkable that after so many years Lee’s status as a preeminent action hero and martial arts star hasn’t wavered in the slightest. It’s especially impressive when you consider how little Lee’s life and times have been seen on the big screen over the years. The last time fans received a full biopic was in 1993 with Dragon: The Bruce Lee Story, and as many people would no doubt agree, it’s time for a new exploration of her life.


Next: Bruce Lee’s Fight With WB To Enter The Dragon Explained

Source: Raf Grassetti / Instagram


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Raimi’s Spider-Man 4 and Garfield’s TASM 3 would mean a real Sony Spider-Man verse


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Nigerian artist Fireboy DML and Ed Sheeran take ‘Peru’ to the next level https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/nigerian-artist-fireboy-dml-and-ed-sheeran-take-peru-to-the-next-level/ Fri, 31 Dec 2021 16:29:46 +0000 https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/nigerian-artist-fireboy-dml-and-ed-sheeran-take-peru-to-the-next-level/ Nigerian artist Fireboy DML calls on Grammy-winning singer and songwriter Ed Sheeran for the ultimate collaboration on a new take on “Peru.” Originally released in July, via YBNL Nation / EMPIRE. Fireboy tells the story of a woman who captures his soul and then continues to gain his attention around the world as he travels […]]]>


Nigerian artist Fireboy DML calls on Grammy-winning singer and songwriter Ed Sheeran for the ultimate collaboration on a new take on “Peru.” Originally released in July, via YBNL Nation / EMPIRE.

Fireboy tells the story of a woman who captures his soul and then continues to gain his attention around the world as he travels from Jozi, Miami to San Francisco. Sheeran’s voice echoes against an Afrobeat backdrop, “Pour the bottle I want to level up.” When I’m with you, I can’t get enough. Slow moan, I’m in no rush.

The “Jealous” singer shares his enthusiasm for their couple in a statement released via his publicist.

“It has been a dream to know that Ed Sheeran is a fan of my sound and to see him jump on a song that was inspired by my travels around the world. Not only is it an exciting time for me, but also for the Afrobeats.

Hope this is the first of many collaborations with Ed and other artists around the world, and I can’t wait for everyone to enjoy this song over the holidays.

To date, “Peru” has racked up over 75 million streams and is currently the second most listened to song in Nigeria. The new single and new video comes weeks before Fireboy embarks on his very first Apollo tour of the United States which kicks off in February.

Watch the video from Fireboy DML and Ed Sheeran below.

Stream and download “Peru” here

Share your impressions with us on Social media.



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Victoria artist creates character to be the queen of autographed portraits in Canada – Sooke News Mirror https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/victoria-artist-creates-character-to-be-the-queen-of-autographed-portraits-in-canada-sooke-news-mirror/ Sat, 11 Dec 2021 23:00:00 +0000 https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/victoria-artist-creates-character-to-be-the-queen-of-autographed-portraits-in-canada-sooke-news-mirror/ Shiny felted portraits adorn the walls of a tall heritage brick building in downtown Victoria. The fiber work of artist Dale Roberts fills the central space, surrounded by rooms filled with a variety of objects and art. But portraits – self-made felt pieces and autographed photos – are in the spotlight. Doris Day’s black and […]]]>


Shiny felted portraits adorn the walls of a tall heritage brick building in downtown Victoria. The fiber work of artist Dale Roberts fills the central space, surrounded by rooms filled with a variety of objects and art.

But portraits – self-made felt pieces and autographed photos – are in the spotlight.

Doris Day’s black and white is a good example. Roberts created an 8 × 10 felt tip portrait of Rock Hudson and sent it to the famous late actress who replied that she liked the job and included an autographed portrait of herself.

“I push it into the art realm because it’s a great way to connect with people,” said Roberts.

The courier, the art and the lady are leading the campaign to become the queen of portrait and autograph in Canada.

An idea started in 2000, when Roberts first arrived in Victoria. On the recommendation of a friend, the artist headed to the Moss Street Paint-in. Once there, he felt the need to connect artists with each other and enhance the performance value of popular painting.

One year, he photographed each artist and created postcards which he then mailed them to them.

But by far the longest-running performance piece is an entire character – Dame Mailarta – as obsessed with various forms of postal art as Roberts himself.

Already a bit of a queen – Dame Mailarta has an ever-changing flair for fashion, makeup and hair – has attended conferences in Seattle, San Francisco and even broadcast live on a forum in Italy.

Roberts and the Dame has a collection of over 2,700 signed self-portraits that span the gamut of entertainment, sports, local culture and even the secular realm. Most are listed alphabetically in binders, others in sorted boxes and awaiting classification. The best are hung on the walls of the studio in the Duck Building.

By the way, the building is being redeveloped and Roberts is looking for a new studio space (email mailarta@gmail.com with leads).

The coup would be an autographed portrait of another queen – that of England. After all, they have been corresponding for years.

“The queen and I are like taffy,” he laughs. Although more precisely, it may be Her Majesty’s Maid of Honor. Roberts has two double-sided portraits of Queen Elizabeth (they come with a current image and one from her early years on the throne) signed by her maid of honor. He expects it to be as good as it gets, but appreciates the back and forth.

Everyone is welcome to send their autographed self-portrait to Mailarta’s Portrait Palace, 1324 Broad St., Victoria, BC, Canada V8W 2A9.

Don’t be surprised if there is a little return mail.

c.vanreeuwyk@blackpress.ca


Do you have a story tip? Email: vnc.editorial@blackpress.ca.

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Arts and CultureVictoria




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Career Artist, Artist Finds Community in Arthur’s New Hometown | Art https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/career-artist-artist-finds-community-in-arthurs-new-hometown-art/ Sun, 05 Dec 2021 13:00:00 +0000 https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/career-artist-artist-finds-community-in-arthurs-new-hometown-art/ ARTHUR – As he walked past the stuffed animals, designer handbags and expensive paintings at his downtown Arthurian art gallery, Jerry Winters asked a question. “Do you want me to play something for you?” ” He asked. Dressed in a navy blazer, a pink shirt, orange and blue plaid pants and a gold cashmere tie […]]]>


ARTHUR – As he walked past the stuffed animals, designer handbags and expensive paintings at his downtown Arthurian art gallery, Jerry Winters asked a question.

“Do you want me to play something for you?” ” He asked.

Dressed in a navy blazer, a pink shirt, orange and blue plaid pants and a gold cashmere tie with a matching clutch, his style contrasts directly with the small town known for its large Amish community and Mennonite.

Minutes earlier, a horse and buggy drove past his store, which is full of expensive artwork, some worth as much as six figures, he said.

The 80-year-old sat in front of his Steinway & Sons upright piano behind the counter, and as his fingers pressed the keys, his eyes lit up and his voice took on a British accent.

He swayed back and forth singing an upbeat tune from the musical “Stop the World – I Want To Get Off”, sometimes turning his head towards the empty store as if speaking to an audience.

Sometimes he would improvise lyrics to refer to the conversation at hand.

Winters is comfortable performing in front of an audience, whether it’s a crowd of hundreds or a lone reporter. He spent much of his eight decades on the road, performing in Broadway musicals, piano bars and other venues around the world, and on USO tours during the War of the United States. Vietnam.

“When you cut me off,” he said, “I’m bleeding notes. “

Few things in Winters’ life would have predicted his move to a small and unassuming community in east-central Illinois.

Early start

His career started as a child. When he and his siblings were on the road with their father, a well-known artist, he got odd jobs in the town they were in.

Once, he says, he worked as a rodeo clown. Other times he would perform in a local hall or in a play.

“I worked all I could out of the company,” he said. “My dad encouraged us a lot to learn all we could, so we took tap dancing, ballet, we had to take the voice, we had to take the theater, we had to master the piano, not just to play, but the music. theory was important.

Winters continued to perform into adulthood, transforming into a classic variety artist, even making forays into opera and comedy. Soon, however, he became famous for another art form.

Since his childhood, when he enjoyed painting by numbers, Winters loved to paint. When he went on the road, his provisions always accompanied him. Usually he would give away his intricate folk art paintings or sell them for a small fee.

After he started dating his future wife, Joan, that changed.

At work

Joan, who had grown up in poverty on a southern Illinois farm with no running water or electricity, had transformed into an accomplished businesswoman, eventually becoming a senior marketing director for Mary Kay shortly. time after its foundation. She encouraged him to view his art as a career.

“She said very fondly one day, ‘Don’t be offended when I say that, Jerry. But some of your artist friends and your musician friends are some of the worst businessmen I have ever seen in my life, ”he said. “She said, ‘Do you want help, do you think? You can’t afford it, but I’ll do it for you.

Jerry obliged, and Joan took over the management of his art, forbidding him to donate paintings without clearing it up with it. She quickly got a contract with Sun-Maid Raisins to produce paintings of the California raisins, and her paintings began to sell in the thousands.

Always an itinerant artist, he became known for his paintings, exhibited around the world.

Joan eventually sold her shares in Mary Kay for a significant sum of money to open an art gallery in Carmel-by-the-Sea, Calif., Where they settled. The original small town about 120 miles south of San Francisco was formed as an artists’ paradise and became known for the poets, artists and actors who inhabited it, including former mayor Clint Eastwood, who was the Winters’ neighbor.

All the while, the couple traveled to Illinois regularly to visit Joan’s family, and a few decades ago, on a whim, they decided to buy a big house in Decatur. Several years ago, the couple decided to open a new gallery, but they weren’t sure where it was.

“I said, ‘What are we going to do next? ”Said Jerry Winters. “She said, ‘I’m thinking of Arthur, seriously.’ And I said, ‘Who is Arthur?’ She said, ‘It’s kind of like Carmel when we found it 50 years ago.’ “

Return to Illinois

In 2015, the Joan Winters Fine Art Gallery opened in downtown Arthur, alongside an advertising agency named Amish Country Marketing.

Immediately Jerry realized he was a fish out of water. His wife mentioned that he might want to tone down his clothing choice. He was surprised when people stopped to chat, bringing them meals to welcome them into the community.

It was a different world, he found, from that of the theater community, where he said he had learned to be careful with his confidence.

In Arthur, however, his guard fell.

“It’s a whole different (thing) there,” he said. “I can really say that I have never been so relaxed in my life. I have made more friends here in the past year than in my entire life. I mean real friends. You have to invest in friends. And I can just be me and not have to be protective. So, it’s been a time of rich, rich growth. “

Take root

Four years ago, the couple moved into a house a few blocks from their gallery. Soon after, they sold their house in Carmel-by-the-Sea. Joan passed away on Thanksgiving Day last year at the age of 93, a loss Jerry said he was still dealing with.

The community, however, made it bearable.

“People came here and helped me and I was like, ‘I can’t handle this,'” he said. “I haven’t cooked for a year. There were always fresh casseroles in little zippered containers on my door here, going on every day.

Jerry, of course, always finds notoriety with his paintings. While making the difficult decision to sell his house in France, the Musée d’Art Naïf de Nice recently purchased two of his paintings.

However, his performing career ended when he retired eight years ago.

When he can find a willing friend, client or interviewer, of course, he will be happy to sit down and play a tune. But in Arthur, he found a new kind of comfort that was foreign to him.

“People have time for each other,” he said. “They eat lunch for three hours and sit there and visit and just do special things, you know?” You get used to it here. That’s wonderful. You can really slow down and listen to people.


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Photographer Diana Markosian reveals how she was reunited with her father on “Heard at National Geographic” https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/photographer-diana-markosian-reveals-how-she-was-reunited-with-her-father-on-heard-at-national-geographic/ Thu, 11 Nov 2021 19:39:26 +0000 https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/photographer-diana-markosian-reveals-how-she-was-reunited-with-her-father-on-heard-at-national-geographic/ This week’s episode of Heard at National Geographic us a profile on National Geographic photographer Diana Markosian. Hosted by Peter Gwin, “When family secrets (and soap operas) fuel creativity” not only highlights some of his incredible work, but also his personal story. (Diana Markosian) Raised in Moscow, at age 7, Diana remembers being woken up […]]]>


This week’s episode of Heard at National Geographic us a profile on National Geographic photographer Diana Markosian. Hosted by Peter Gwin, “When family secrets (and soap operas) fuel creativity” not only highlights some of his incredible work, but also his personal story.

(Diana Markosian)

Raised in Moscow, at age 7, Diana remembers being woken up in the middle of the night by her mother and taken to the airport with her older brother. She was not told where she was going and they ended up landing in Santa Barbara, a place familiar to her family from a 1980s soap opera that aired in Russia. A man named Eli, who was waiting for his mother at the airport, was older than the photos he had sent her.

What Diana’s mother had not told her was that after the collapse of the Societ Union, she was looking for a way out of Russia and started to correspond with American men to get her out of her and their children. Over the years, Diana grew up, went to writing school, and discovered her love for photography.

“When I finished my master’s degree, I remember meeting a young photographer who told me that I should go back to Russia,” Diana shares in the episode. “And I just remember saying, I don’t really know anyone in Russia. And he said, Well, you’ll meet someone. It was a Monday. And one Friday, I had a one-way ticket to Moscow.

Following a terrorist attack in 2011, Diana traveled to Chechnya in order to photograph the suicide bomber’s family. Another photographer had previously been arrested trying to take the same photo, but she was able to pass by, meet the family and capture an image of the bomber’s mother praying on her empty bed, apologizing for what her son had done. She sent the photo before her flight home and by the time it reached Moscow it was the photo of the month to Reuters.

While living in Moscow, Diana had considered trying to find her father. She had even found her old childhood home and gone to see it, but the memories were too painful. Turns out his dad didn’t live there anyway, but his brother knew where to find him. Together they went to the door and knocked and an old man answered, which Diana realized was her grandfather. She soon finds her father.

“Hearing my dad’s story, I think, helped me a lot, because my dad had a suitcase of all these items he collected when we went missing,” Diana recalls. “This suitcase of things my father gathered for us was a kind of opening that allowed me to understand that I was important to my father, that he loved me, that those 15 years were not just you. know, passed to forget me, but he was looking.

All her family again, Diana remembers a particularly significant mission of her stay in Russia. She was commissioned by a foundation to find the survivors of the genocide of the Ottoman Empire of 1915 who fled Turkey to Armenia. There was no list, so she used voter registration and birth certificates as a starting point. “I found 10 survivors. And by the time I created their portraits and returned to them, only three of them were still alive. So it’s about nine months later. And when I started interviewing the survivors, they felt like grandparents. And, you know, I was separated from my story in a way, because we didn’t grow up feeling Armenian, Russian. I grew up feeling American.

Diana sympathized with the survivors’ desire to return to see what the homes and villages of their youth looked like. Photography provided her with a way to bring them back to their birthplace in the form of 3-meter-high billboards that she created from her photographs. Through this project, she sums up what makes her work so important: “It’s this feeling of this ability to go back in time, to understand something for yourself and to bring it back to the present. I think this is the greatest gift photography has given me, it’s a second chance to really understand my place in the world and how I relate to it – and how I can do it for those that I do. also photographs.

You can learn more about Diana Markosian by visiting his personal website. His cinema, Santa barbara, currently performing at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art and the New York International Center of Photography.

Click here to listen Heard on National Geographic.


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San Bruno to host community workshop on redistribution efforts – CBS San Francisco https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/san-bruno-to-host-community-workshop-on-redistribution-efforts-cbs-san-francisco/ Sun, 31 Oct 2021 14:00:00 +0000 https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/san-bruno-to-host-community-workshop-on-redistribution-efforts-cbs-san-francisco/ SAN BRUNO (BCN) – The city of San Bruno is hosting a community workshop on Monday on the process of redistributing its seats on city council. City officials said the workshop, which will be held virtually on Zoom and is scheduled for 7 p.m., will be held to showcase mapping tools for the redistribution process […]]]>


SAN BRUNO (BCN) – The city of San Bruno is hosting a community workshop on Monday on the process of redistributing its seats on city council.

City officials said the workshop, which will be held virtually on Zoom and is scheduled for 7 p.m., will be held to showcase mapping tools for the redistribution process using data from the recent 2020 U.S. Census. published. State law requires the city to do public education for the process, the results of which will remain in effect for a decade until the next census.

READ MORE: Sonoma man overturns car after fleeing officers in Santa Rosa

The mapping tools are available at districtingsanbruno.org/Draw-a-Map and will be discussed at Monday’s meeting.

READ MORE: COVID: Mixed indicators of economic recovery in San Francisco as restrictions ease

The city will also be hosting an in-person workshop at 2 p.m. on November 13 at City Hall at 567 El Camino Real, and will have until a hearing in January to draw the proposed maps and submit comments before the final maps of the district are adopted,

The link for Monday’s meeting and information on upcoming meetings can be found at https://districtingsanbruno.org/Schedule.

NO MORE NEWS: Seven injured in early morning traffic accident at Concord Willow Pass

© Copyright 2021 CBS Broadcasting Inc. and Bay City News Service. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.


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Halyna Hutchins: Who was the cinematographer shot in an accident involving Alec Baldwin? https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/halyna-hutchins-who-was-the-cinematographer-shot-in-an-accident-involving-alec-baldwin/ Fri, 22 Oct 2021 20:53:00 +0000 https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/halyna-hutchins-who-was-the-cinematographer-shot-in-an-accident-involving-alec-baldwin/ Hutchins, who was 42, was the cinematographer for Baldwin’s latest film, “Rust,” a western that was shot in New Mexico and starred Baldwin, Travis Fimmel and Jensen Ackles. According to law enforcement statements provided to CNN, Hutchins was shot dead at around 1:50 p.m. local time on Thursday and airlifted to hospital, but died of […]]]>


Hutchins, who was 42, was the cinematographer for Baldwin’s latest film, “Rust,” a western that was shot in New Mexico and starred Baldwin, Travis Fimmel and Jensen Ackles.

According to law enforcement statements provided to CNN, Hutchins was shot dead at around 1:50 p.m. local time on Thursday and airlifted to hospital, but died of her injuries.

In a tweet Friday, Baldwin said he was heartbroken and was cooperating fully with police over the tragic accident.

“There are no words to express my shock and sadness over the tragic accident that claimed the life of Halyna Hutchins, a deeply admired wife, mother and colleague,” said Baldwin. “My heart is broken for her husband, their son and all who knew and loved Halyna.”

Her husband, Michael Hutchins, told Insider that he appreciates the sympathy he has received.

“I don’t think there are words to communicate the situation,” he told the online news site. “I think we’ll need a little time before we can really sum up his life in a way that’s easy to communicate.”

Hutchins said he would not comment on the facts of his wife’s death.

She was named a rising star two years ago

Born in Ukraine, Halyna Hutchins lived in Los Angeles and graduated from the American Film Institute in 2015. She has been credited with her involvement in the production of 49 film, television and video titles during her career, according to IMDB.

She has worked on films including “Archenemy”, starring Joe Manganiello, released last year, and was named Rising Star by American Cinematographer magazine in 2019.

According to her website, Hutchins was raised at a Soviet military base in the Arctic Circle and first studied as a journalist, graduating from Kyiv National University with a degree in international journalism, before working on productions. documentaries across Europe and go to the movies. .

On her Instagram page, she described herself as a “Restless dreamer. Adrenaline junkie. Filmmaker” and shared photos from the set of “Rust”.

Her last post on Wednesday showed a video of her riding in New Mexico.

Director James Cullen Bressack commented on his post to say: “I will miss you my friend … this is devastating.”

Other directors have paid tribute to Hutchins.

‘Archenemy’ director Adam Egypt Mortimer said, “I’m so sad that I lost Halyna. And so furious that it could happen on set. He was a brilliant talent who was absolutely dedicated to the art. and in the cinema. ” He said in another tweet that she had “a brilliant mind”.

AFI Conservatory, a film school that is part of the American Film Institute, tweeted Friday: “As is deeply true in the art of cinematography, words alone cannot account for the loss of a being so dear to the AFI community. At AFI, we are committed to seeing that Halyna Hutchins will live on in the minds of all who strive to see their dreams come true in well-told stories. “

A talented woman in a male dominated industry

Hutchins’ achievements as a director of photography were remarkable in an industry dominated by men.

Casting Director, Producer and Screenwriter Sidra Smith posted on Instagram she was “devastated” by the news about Hutchins, with whom she worked on the television miniseries “A Luv Tale”.

“It’s tough here for female filmmakers and it was a HUGE opportunity for her. She was so young and so talented. Halyna and I spent so much time together. She was so wonderfully gracious and words cannot express to how much she supported me, “Smith wrote. “God bless her beautiful heart and her soul.”

Santa Fe County Sheriff's officers respond to the scene of the fatal accidental shooting Thursday.

Director Joel Souza, 48, was also injured in the incident and taken to Christus St. Vincent Regional Medical Center for treatment.

Baldwin was pictured looking distraught in the parking lot outside the Santa Fe County Sheriff’s Office on Thursday after being questioned.

Investigations continue, with many wondering how such a tragedy could have happened on a film set – 28 years after Bruce Lee’s son, Brandon Lee, was accidentally killed on set by a gun.

A spokesman for the Ukrainian Foreign Ministry said the Ukrainian Consulate General in San Francisco is cooperating with US law enforcement officials in their investigation and is contacting relatives of Hutchins “to provide the ‘consular and legal assistance required “.

CNN’s Sandra Gonzalez and Katharina Krebs contributed to this report.



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Inaugural WOPHA Miami convention makes room for women in photography https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/inaugural-wopha-miami-convention-makes-room-for-women-in-photography/ Thu, 21 Oct 2021 15:40:22 +0000 https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/inaugural-wopha-miami-convention-makes-room-for-women-in-photography/ Aldeide Delgado sees Miami as a frontier, a meeting place, a city where minds and ideas from all over the world come together and exchange views and critiques. Thus, it is the ideal place for an international congregation of academics and thinkers – in the case of Delgado, the inaugural Women Photographers International Archive (WOPHA), […]]]>


Aldeide Delgado sees Miami as a frontier, a meeting place, a city where minds and ideas from all over the world come together and exchange views and critiques. Thus, it is the ideal place for an international congregation of academics and thinkers Рin the case of Delgado, the inaugural Women Photographers International Archive (WOPHA), a summit for women in photography that will bring together photographers, historians and curators from over 15 different countries. at the P̩rez Art Museum in Miami on November 18. Entitled Women, Photography and Feminisms, the Congress is the first of its kind, a necessary pioneering force for marginalized voices on the ground.

Maggie Steber, Lakota Sioux Elder and spiritual leader Marie Randall prays on the ancestral lands of the Pine Ridge Lakota Sioux Reservation, South Dakota, USA, 2004 © Maggie Steber. Courtesy of the artist.

Delgado founded WOPHA as a non-profit, with the aim of amplifying the contributions of female, trans, queer and non-binary photographers and thinkers in modern and contemporary art. The Congress philosophy began with the Delgado Catalog of Cuban Women Photographers, an online database dedicated to preserving the work of women photographers in Cuba. But international protests for women’s rights in recent years prompted her to expand the catalog globally, which gave birth to WOPHA.

Delgado explained that while advances in female representation in art and photography have been made as a result of movements like #MeToo, the necessary work remains to be done.

Tamary Kudita, African Victorian II, 2020 © Tamary Kudita. Courtesy of the artist.

“All of these political scenarios have influenced groups of organizations and collectives of women photographers,” she says. “And that is why it is so important to do the governance of the first international meeting, where these organizations and these collectives can come together.”

More than 25 internationally renowned academics and photographers will attend the Congress, which is free and open to anyone, both virtually and in person. The Congress will be punctuated by conversations on collaboration, aesthetics and the rapprochement of women in the arts, through the eyes of feminism and decolonization. The conversations will feature academics such as Laylah Amatullah Barrayn, co-founder of MFON: Women Photographers of the African Diaspora; Anna Fox, founder of Fast Forward: Women in Photography; Roxana Marcoci, Senior Curator of Photography at MoMA; and award-winning documentary photographer Maggie Steber, among others.

Anna Renard, Linda in the green garden, 2011 © Anna Fox. Courtesy of the artist and the James Hyman Gallery.

WOPHA will engage with other institutions across Miami, including the Arts Connection Foundation, Green Space Miami, the Lucie Foundation, the Betsy Hotel and the Rubell Museum. The inclusion of diverse spaces throughout the city reflects Delgado’s hopes to make Miami a crucial space for speech and conversation and to “position WOPHA in the international context”.

“The widening of the scope of the project is the result of my identification with the political character of the city and the importance of highlighting the work of women not only in the Caribbean, Latin America and South Florida. , but in the whole world in general “, declared the founder,” and how, thanks to this concept of border space, it can be made possible “.

Carlotta Boettcher, Gay Parade III. Civic center, Series of Urban Portraits of San Francisco, 1972-1978. © Carlotta Boettcher. Courtesy of the artist.

One of the most anticipated events of the event is Delgado’s conversation with Andrea Nelson, curator of “The New Woman Behind the Camera”, organized by the National Gallery of Art in association with the Metropolitan Museum of Art. In conjunction with the wide range of speeches in Congress, he will explore the impact of women on modern photography.

The Congress will also feature Luce Lebart’s US debut and Marie Robert’s A Global History of Women Photographers, a stunning anthology featuring over 450 images from over 300 women photographers throughout history.

Deborah Willis, Carrie at the Euro Lounge, Eatonville, 2009 © Deborah Willis. Courtesy of the artist.

Delgado hopes to bring Congress together every three years, allowing the collective to “continue the proposals that we make in Congress,” she said. “It’s about acting. It’s about creating our own spaces and seeing how we can increase our impact in a global context.

Ultimately, she hopes the gatherings will have an outside influence on the world of photography. “We seek to have an impact on the programming of institutions, encouraging them to collect, exhibit and research the practices of women in photography,” says Delgado. “We want to see more opportunities for women photographers.”

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