open public – David Hemmings Bird Photography http://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/ Sat, 12 Mar 2022 09:59:32 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-2021-06-25T155134.587.png open public – David Hemmings Bird Photography http://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/ 32 32 Broadway Photographer Exhibit on Display at Ole Miss | Mississippi News https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/broadway-photographer-exhibit-on-display-at-ole-miss-mississippi-news/ Sat, 12 Mar 2022 06:01:00 +0000 https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/broadway-photographer-exhibit-on-display-at-ole-miss-mississippi-news/ By BROOKE BULLOCK BURLESON, Daily Journal OXFORD, Mississippi (AP) — When Jenny Anderson graduated from the University of Mississippi more than a decade ago, she had no idea her career path would include photographing Broadway stars and actors and Oscar-nominated actresses. “When I was younger, my dad was an artist and an art teacher. My […]]]>

By BROOKE BULLOCK BURLESON, Daily Journal

OXFORD, Mississippi (AP) — When Jenny Anderson graduated from the University of Mississippi more than a decade ago, she had no idea her career path would include photographing Broadway stars and actors and Oscar-nominated actresses.

“When I was younger, my dad was an artist and an art teacher. My mom was a performer in theater productions,” Anderson said. age.

More than 14 years of Anderson’s work as a Broadway and freelance photographer are on display at the Gertrude C. Ford Center for the Performing Arts at the University of Mississippi.

Titled “The In Between: Intimate & Candid Moments of Broadway’s Stars,” the exhibit includes 45 images, which span Anderson’s legendary career in its entirety. Some stars featured in the gallery are Megan Hilty, Glenn Close, Lin-Manuel Miranda, Vanessa Williams, Tom Hiddleston, and Sierra Boggess.

political cartoons

The exhibition opened on January 28 and will run until at least the end of the spring semester.

Anderson earned her bachelor’s degree in journalism and wrote and produced news for the Daily Mississippian while a student at Ole Miss. After graduating, Anderson moved to New York, where she interned and later worked as a full-time employee for Broadway. com.

Anderson said that although she has been photographing Broadway shows and stars for nearly 15 years, she had not yet seen her work exhibited until it debuted at the Ford Center.

“It pretty much covers the 14 years,” Anderson said of the exhibit.

Anderson is a full-time resident of New York, but she still maintains her Mississippi roots. Her parents live in the Oxford area and she visits them often. She recently came to the University of Mississippi campus to see her artwork unveiled this year.

“My former professor, Ellen Meachum, was my advisor when we did the Daily Mississippian in college,” Anderson said. “She has been part of my career for years and has always supported and advised me.”

About two years ago, Meachum connected Anderson with his sister, Kate Meachum, who oversees marketing at the Ford Center.

“Kate said she would like me to host a show at Ford Center,” Anderson said.

The show was originally slated to debut in 2020, but has been pushed back several times due to the coronavirus pandemic.

Kate Meachum said that as a theater where national tours and Broadway shows take place, it’s special to have photos of shows that will end up filming at Ford Center.

“The connection to Broadway and theater is something that we were interested in,” Meachum said.

Anderson said this show is mostly made up of behind-the-scenes moments at theaters and the Tony Awards.

“It’s the in-between moments before they go on stage or dress up,” she said.

Since Broadway was closed during the COVID-19 pandemic, Anderson has instead filmed for ABC’s morning shows, including LIVE with Kelly and Ryan and The View. She also had the opportunity to cover election night in 2020 and the presidential inauguration in early 2021.

Anderson has also photographed musical sensations like Cyndi Lauper and Demi Lovato and critically acclaimed actors like Amy Adams and Andrew Garfield.

The exhibit is free and open to the public during Ford Center hours.

Copyright 2022 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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HAPPY TO EXHIBIT: Artist Clinton’s ‘The Grove’ Pops Up This Summer | Local News https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/happy-to-exhibit-artist-clintons-the-grove-pops-up-this-summer-local-news/ Tue, 01 Mar 2022 01:00:00 +0000 https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/happy-to-exhibit-artist-clintons-the-grove-pops-up-this-summer-local-news/ CLINTON — Local abstract artist Gabi Torres has received a $5,000 grant from the Iowa Department of Cultural Affairs, which she is using to create an outdoor installation called “The Grove.” The grant is part of ongoing efforts to provide relief to Iowa artists and cultural organizations impacted by challenges caused by the COVID pandemic. […]]]>

CLINTON — Local abstract artist Gabi Torres has received a $5,000 grant from the Iowa Department of Cultural Affairs, which she is using to create an outdoor installation called “The Grove.”

The grant is part of ongoing efforts to provide relief to Iowa artists and cultural organizations impacted by challenges caused by the COVID pandemic. Using it to fund “The Grove,” Torres wants to take action to bring about positive change within the community.

When Torres acquired her studio at 83 Main Ave., Clinton, in December 2020, she had wanted it to be more open to the public as a gallery showcasing the work of local artists and a place where she could offer classes. of art. Studio space limitations, however, made it difficult to accommodate social distancing recommendations. Torres was able to secure grants that allowed him to make his art available to the public in other ways.

Torres wants to create more of an arts culture in Clinton and help make it a place that people from other cities will want to visit as an arts destination.

Also, she wants to change the narrative of the city.

“I feel like sometimes people tell each other certain stories about a place where they live, maybe focusing on things that aren’t as positive.” Torres says, “We can start to change the story that we tell ourselves about where we are and where we live, but to help everyone be able to see that, you know, you have to do things to make people realize that this is not the case, or to change their point of view.

To achieve these ambitions, Torres creates his first outdoor installation as a magical forest consisting of 12 paintings of varying sizes, each suspended by eyelets and springs in wooden frames made by Tim Fuller and Charlie Woods of Retired with Wood, and located this summer in Pocket Park in the 100 block of South Fourth Avenue.

The urban aspect of this place contributes to the contrast created by the juxtaposition of something improbable found between two buildings in the city. If consistent with the style that Torres’ other current works have evolved to represent, the pieces included in “The Grove” will be gestural, energetic and lyrical abstract works of art.

Making “The Grove” was not without its challenges. Initially, funding for the project was questioned. The relief grant was originally $10,000. In order to distribute the funds over several projects, this amount has been divided.

“When I saw that, I was like, well, I can’t — I don’t want to do this project for $5,000,” Torres says. “It only really works if it’s at the $10,000 mark.”

The generosity of local businesses and organizations, as well as some very kind people, she said, enabled Torres to make up the amount she wanted to see the project completed to its full potential. Some of those she appreciates for their support, financial or otherwise, include the Iowa Arts Council, Clinton National Bank, Citizens First Bank, Brocolo, Kersh Digital, Clinton Convention and Visitors Bureau, Downtown Clinton Alliance, Josh Eggers of Clinton Parks and Rec, and Brian Lemke, director of public works for Clinton.

Another hurdle early on in creating “The Grove” was what material she was going to paint on.

“The canvas I paint on is not meant to be outdoors – far from it,” she says.

Needing a material that could withstand the outdoor elements, she envisioned a type of canvas used for boat sails. In the end, with the help of Connie Vulich, Torres’ project and event coordinator, and Steve Pearson, owner of Upholstery Unlimited at 1814 N. Second St., Torres settled on the canvas normally used for the soft tops of convertible cars.

“I wouldn’t be able to complete this project without his help,” Torres says of Vulich. “It’s a huge project. It’s a huge undertaking.

So far, Torres and his team of Vulich, Fuller, and Woods have collectively invested hundreds of hours into making “The Grove,” and there’s still a long way to go. At this point, the rest of the frames are being built by Fuller and Woods. Once these are completed, they will measure to find the sizes of the canvases and the quantities of other materials that Torres will need to order before beginning the labor-intensive painting.

Although creating “The Grove” has been a stressful and scary process at times, Torres isn’t going through it alone.

“I have a great team that I work with,” she says. “So one of the reasons why this project is right, for me, as important to me personally as it is, is because of all the different people I work with.”

Learn more about Gabi Torres and her art online at https://gabriella-torres.com.

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Workshop teaches participants how to make maple syrup | News https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/workshop-teaches-participants-how-to-make-maple-syrup-news/ Thu, 17 Feb 2022 12:51:09 +0000 https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/workshop-teaches-participants-how-to-make-maple-syrup-news/ (WSIL) — Are you interested in learning more about making your own maple syrup? If so, head to the Sixth Annual Backyard Maple Syrup Production Workshop on February 19 at 10 a.m. at the Dixon Springs Agricultural Center. Maple sap collection and syrup production is easy, relatively inexpensive to start, and is a great late […]]]>

(WSIL) — Are you interested in learning more about making your own maple syrup? If so, head to the Sixth Annual Backyard Maple Syrup Production Workshop on February 19 at 10 a.m. at the Dixon Springs Agricultural Center.

Maple sap collection and syrup production is easy, relatively inexpensive to start, and is a great late winter project that can be fun for the whole family. Sugar maples, the species generally considered for sap collection, are abundant in southern Illinois, but other maple species can also be tapped to make syrup.

The all-outdoor program will cover tree identification, equipment needs, tree tapping, sap collection, maple syrup boiling and finishing.

Attendees will see firsthand the processes involved in making maple syrup. We will demonstrate a syrup evaporator and an optional tour of a maple grove, managed for maple syrup production and using a sap collection pipeline system.

The University of Illinois extension will offer children an indoor maple syrup program. Masks will be mandatory inside.

The workshop will be held on Saturday, February 19 from 10-11:30 a.m. at the Dixon Springs Agricultural Center, located at 354 State Highway 145 N, Simpson, IL 62985. This program is free and open to the public.

Register by calling the Ag Center at 618-695-3383 or emailing cwevans@illinois.edu by February 18.

DIRECTIONS:

Dixon Springs Agricultural Center is located on Illinois 145, 25 miles south of Harrisburg and 25 miles north of Paducah, KY.

The center is located 4 miles north of the intersection of Illinois 146 and Illinois 145, which is 13 miles east of Vienna.






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CHILD OF THE SUN DISTINGUISHED SPEAKERS SERIES RETURNS WITH CELEBRATED PHOTOGRAPHER https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/child-of-the-sun-distinguished-speakers-series-returns-with-celebrated-photographer/ Mon, 07 Feb 2022 21:07:00 +0000 https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/child-of-the-sun-distinguished-speakers-series-returns-with-celebrated-photographer/ LAKELAND, Florida., February 7, 2022 /PRNewswire/ — Florida Southern College’s Child of the Sun Distinguished Speakers series returns with a look at life through the lens of a camera. John Pinderhughes Renowned commercial and fine art photographer John Pinderhughes will deliver a lecture using his photographs from his career spanning over 50 years. The conference […]]]>

LAKELAND, Florida., February 7, 2022 /PRNewswire/ — Florida Southern College’s Child of the Sun Distinguished Speakers series returns with a look at life through the lens of a camera.

John Pinderhughes

Renowned commercial and fine art photographer John Pinderhughes will deliver a lecture using his photographs from his career spanning over 50 years. The conference titled “Understanding One Another: Storytelling and Human Experience” will take place at 7 p.m. to February 9 at Branscomb Auditorium.

The Child of the Sun Distinguished Speakers series brings together speakers of national and international renown South Florida College campuses and land of lakes community several times a year to explore some of the most fascinating issues and events of our time. Featuring acclaimed experts, the series aims to provoke thought, stimulate conversation and inspire action on a wide range of topics.

Pinderhughes’ commercial work is best described as “real people” and “illustration” photography. Major advertising agencies, record labels, magazines and large corporations are among his regular clients. Recent projects include Publix Super Markets, Sony, Verizon, BMW, hunting bankAnheuser-Busch, Canon and American Express.

Pinderhughes’ fine art photography explores variations in pattern, texture, light and line. It has been widely exhibited and is represented in major collections; including the Picker Art Gallery at Colgate Universitythe Museum of Modern Art, the Studio Museum of Harlem, the Detroit Institute of Arts and the Ringling Museum.

Parallel to Pinderhughes’ speech at South Floridahis work is also currently on display at the Polk Museum of Art through February 24.

Pinderhughes is the first guest on the Child of the Sun Distinguished Speakers series since February 2020, but Dr. Sarah Fletcher Hardingthe dean of arts and sciences at South Floridahopes to be able to find one or two additional speakers this year.

“To bring an amazing speaker to campus in a way that is safe for our audience and our speaker, it is so important for us to do so,” Fletcher Harding noted. “We are very happy to have John Pinderhughes as our first speaker. He will talk about his own photographic journey intertwined in some of his photographs. Just hearing him talk about his own life experience is fascinating.”

The appearance of Pinderhughes will require wearing a mask in Branscomb. The conference is open to the public.

About College of South Florida
Founded in 1883, South Florida College is the oldest private college in the state. The College maintains its commitment to academic excellence through more than 70 undergraduate programs and distinctive graduate programs in business administration, education, nursing, and physical therapy. South Florida has a 14:1 student-faculty ratio, is an award-winning national leader in engaged learning, and has 30 NCAA Division II National Championships. Florida Southern is ranked #8 in the “Top Regional Universities in the South” by US News and World Report in its 2022 “Best Colleges” guide and is included in The Princeton Review 2022 Top 387 Colleges guide and the “Fiske Guide to Colleges 2022”. The 2021-2022 Colleges of Distinction Guide praises Florida Southern’s AACSB-accredited Barney Barnett School of Business and Free Enterprise, alongside the College’s School of Education and its Ann Blanton Edwards School of Nursing and Health Sciences. Poets and quants, US News and World Report, and The Princeton Review additionally praise the Barney Barnett School of Business and Free Enterprise and the Ann Blanton Edwards School of Nursing and Health Sciences as the nation’s leading programs for business and nursing education. Home to the world’s largest unique collection of Frank Lloyd Wright architecture, FSC has appeared on The Princeton Review’s National 20 “Most Beautiful Campuses” list for 12 consecutive years. Connect with Florida Southern College.

Florida Southern College, Lakeland, Florida (PRNewsfoto/Florida Southern College)

Florida Southern College, Lakeland, Florida (PRNewsfoto/Florida Southern College)

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City holds public workshop on traffic changes after an influx of concerns https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/city-holds-public-workshop-on-traffic-changes-after-an-influx-of-concerns/ Sun, 23 Jan 2022 00:38:36 +0000 https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/city-holds-public-workshop-on-traffic-changes-after-an-influx-of-concerns/ Jan. 22 – In a Thursday meeting between the Mayor of Frederick and the Board of Aldermen, Mayor Michael O’Connor announced a public workshop next month on some recently announced traffic changes along Christophers Crossing. During the meeting, O’Connor said the workshop was the result of a high volume of public response to the announcements. […]]]>

Jan. 22 – In a Thursday meeting between the Mayor of Frederick and the Board of Aldermen, Mayor Michael O’Connor announced a public workshop next month on some recently announced traffic changes along Christophers Crossing.

During the meeting, O’Connor said the workshop was the result of a high volume of public response to the announcements.

Traffic plans were recently announced by the city and included a number of changes along Christopher’s Crossing including a new traffic light installed at the intersection with Opossumtown Pike, an increase in speed limits of 25 mph at 30 mph along Christopher’s Crossing and Monocacy Boulevard. between Opossumtown Pike and Md. 26, and a number of pedestrian-oriented improvements at the intersection of Christopher’s Crossing and Timber Grove Road.

According to O’Connor, many of the public’s concerns center on the improvements to Timber Grove Road.

“To continue to engage with the public and respond comprehensively to the feedback we’ve received to date,” O’Connor said, “the mayor and council of aldermen will host a workshop on this topic on February 23.”

O’Connor said no work would be done on the projects until the end of the workshop, with the exception of the new red light on Opossumtown Pike which has already been commissioned.

The meeting will be open to public comments. O’Connor said at Thursday’s meeting that it remains to be seen whether aldermen will vote on changes to traffic plans.

Also at Thursday’s meeting, the board unanimously approved acceptance of a grant from the U.S. Department of Justice under the Connect and Protect: Law Enforcement Behavioral Health Responses grant from a amount of $280,254.

The funds are spread over three years at the Frederick Police Department, with the department required to match funds over the years. The police service will pay 20% of the federal government’s contribution for the first two years, before increasing to 40% for the third year.

Grant funds will cover personnel expenses in the form of overtime, as per the city’s grant allocation.

The Board of Aldermen also approved an amendment to the 2022 budget to reflect the aforementioned grant expenditures.

In other news, Aldermen have unanimously approved a request from the Downton Frederick Partnership to serve beer and wine at Alive@Five’s outdoor happy hour events, which will take place on Thursday evenings from May 12 to September 29 at the Carroll Creek Amphitheater.

The city has approved an agreement with telecommunications company Crown Castle Fiber to install small cellular boxes in the city, which will increase cellular connectivity in the city. Assistant City Attorney Rachel Depo told the meeting that all boxes installed in the city’s historic district should meet the aesthetic standards set for the neighborhood.

Council members also approved the city’s acquisition of 4,405 square feet of land on West Patrick Street in the state of Maryland for the price of $63,665. This land will be used for the development of water pumping infrastructure in the region.

A resolution for the city to annex the almost 80-acre Winpenny Tell property was also introduced, but this resolution will be voted on later.

Follow Patrick Kernan on Twitter: @PatKernan

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Local News in Brief: Meet the Artist from OHIO Southern | New https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/local-news-in-brief-meet-the-artist-from-ohio-southern-new/ Thu, 25 Nov 2021 06:00:00 +0000 https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/local-news-in-brief-meet-the-artist-from-ohio-southern-new/ IRONTON Ohio University Southern will host a Meet the Artist virtual event for Charleston artist Mark Tobin Moore at 3 p.m. on Thursday, December 2. Her work is currently on display in the Ohio Southern Art Gallery and will be on display until December 3. The gallery is open to the public from 9 a.m. […]]]>


IRONTON

Ohio University Southern will host a Meet the Artist virtual event for Charleston artist Mark Tobin Moore at 3 p.m. on Thursday, December 2.

Her work is currently on display in the Ohio Southern Art Gallery and will be on display until December 3. The gallery is open to the public from 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday to Friday.

Moore is a mixed media painter and collagist whose work has been exhibited throughout the United States as well as Germany and France.

He is a Navy veteran and received his BA in Studio Art from the University of Charleston. He holds an MA in Art from Marshall University and an MA in Painting from the University of West Virginia. He has given art classes at the university level as well as in many museums.

This year, he joined a veteran artist group, Uniting US, based in Northern Virginia, which exhibits the creative work of veterans across the country. Two of her paintings have been included in two different group exhibitions this year at the Military Women’s Memorial at the entrance to Arlington National Cemetery.

To receive the Zoom link of the event, register at https://bit.ly/MarkTobinMoore

Tri-State Marks

Festival in progress

HUNTINGTON

The 2021 Tri-State Makes Festival, the Robert C. Byrd Institute’s (RCBI) annual celebration of creativity and ingenuity, offers free hands-on activities to engage creators of all skill levels.

Hobbyists, inventors, DIY enthusiasts, artists and students who participate in the Design Challenge will compete for $ 5,000 in prizes, including a “Best of Show” grand prize. Entrants must create a unique innovation and submit a video no longer than 3 minutes by December 2 explaining their creation and the manufacturing process. The competition is open to residents and students of schools in West Virginia, Ohio, and Kentucky. Prizes will be announced on December 9 at a virtual online event.

This year, the Makes Festival will also offer the following Maker Master courses and activities:

• 3D design and 3D printing: Tuesday November 30 (6:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m.)

This free workshop at RCBI Huntington (1050 Fourth Ave.) will teach participants how to use popular computer-aided design (CAD) software to create unique designs that will be 3D printed at RCBI and take home.

• 2D design and laser cutting: Saturday, December 4 (10 a.m. to noon)

Attendees of this free workshop at RCBI Huntington will learn how to create dazzling light displays using free online computer-aided design (CAD) software, which will be produced on RCBI’s laser cutters. Participants keep their creations.

• Design Thinking demo and awards ceremony: Thursday December 9 (10:00 am to 11:00 am – live virtual event)

Tricia Ball from Marshall University’s iCenter will provide a brief introduction to this collaborative and hands-on approach to problem solving and creativity, followed by RCBI presenting over $ 5,000 in prizes to its Design winners. Challenge.

For more details and to register, visit www.rcbi.org/makesfest2021. The Tri-State Makes Festival is made possible by the generous support of Edward Tucker Architects and Suddenlink.

National No-Tillage

Return conference at Ky.

No-till planting, a practice that was first successful in Kentucky, will turn 60 next year. For only the second time in its 30-year history, the National No-Till Conference, the event that celebrates and encourages no-till practices for agriculture, will return to Kentucky, the commissioner said at agriculture, Dr. Ryan Quarles.

The National No-Till Conference is scheduled for Jan. 4-7 at Galt House in Louisville. The four-day event will feature insights from leading no-till growers, agronomists, researchers and other no-till experts sharing ideas for farmers to get the most out of their no-till system. .

Although the idea of ​​no-till farming has been researched for years, it wasn’t until 1962 that farmer Harry Young of Christian County, Ky., Got the first crop. successful zero-tillage corn business. Using a combination of herbicides and atrazine for weed control and a mule drill, Young harvested 0.7 acres of corn using this new method. It was a necessary method for Kentucky farmers who had soil erosion problems with regular farming practices on the state’s hills.

Sixty years later, the no-till movement has become dominant. Today, more than 104 million acres in the United States are in no-till production, according to the 2017 Agricultural Census. Farm producers are always keen to learn more about the practice. The national conference expects up to 1,000 participants in January.

To help farmers in Kentucky and other southern states take a more operational approach to their soil conservation practices, the Southern Sustainable Agriculture Research & Education (SSARE) program provided scholarships to support participating farmers at the National No-Till Conference for the first time.

The scholarship covers the full registration fee of $ 449 for the four-day event. To apply for the scholarship (limited to new participants from southern states), visit no-tillfarmer.com/NNTCscholarship. The application process will be on a first come, first served basis until December 15, 2021.


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Photo Opp will inspire Appleton photographers and videographers https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/photo-opp-will-inspire-appleton-photographers-and-videographers/ Wed, 24 Nov 2021 22:04:00 +0000 https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/photo-opp-will-inspire-appleton-photographers-and-videographers/ APPLETON, Wisconsin (WBAY) – Appleton’s “Photo Opp” arrived. A new nonprofit, launched last week, aims to create a visual workspace for photographers and videographers. There is plenty of space in downtown Appleton for businesses and businesses, but nothing, exclusively, for creatives like – photographers and videographers – so far. Photo Opp is a visual workspace […]]]>


APPLETON, Wisconsin (WBAY) – Appleton’s “Photo Opp” arrived. A new nonprofit, launched last week, aims to create a visual workspace for photographers and videographers.

There is plenty of space in downtown Appleton for businesses and businesses, but nothing, exclusively, for creatives like – photographers and videographers – so far. Photo Opp is a visual workspace for all members of the community.

“Photo Opp is a place where photography and video enthusiasts and professionals can come together and learn together,” says co-founder Graham Washatka.

The nonprofit, which will be housed in a former church on North Bateman Street, is the brainchild of three local artists.

According to co-founder John Adams, “We kind of found out there was a need for a space like this. My experience in video, Graham’s experience in digital photography and Mark’s experience in photography and film development – it all kind of came together as something we all thought the community needed.

Photo Opp will provide a studio and workspace for artists. The plan is to renovate the ground floor of the building into a darkroom for hands-on experiences, while an upstairs studio will be a place to work and learn. Photo Opp hopes to inspire young and old, nurture careers and develop skills while being surrounded by those who are already accomplished in the company.

“There’s going to be a studio where they can go in and have access to material that they can’t afford yet. They’re going to have people working in the company here who can help them and answer questions. It will be a full-service visual place, ”adds co-founder Mark Ferrell

Photo Opp is about to launch its fundraising campaign to help bring its vision to life. The organization hopes to cash in on a $ 5,000 game on Tuesday Giving. Board member Morgan Kirchenwitz said: “We are in space, Photo Opp owns the space, but we need to transform that space and reshape it so that it is ready to host programming. that we are going to offer to the community. ”

Because Photo Opp wants to be open to the public and to its creativity by June or July.

Copyright 2021 WBAY. All rights reserved.


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Airgood will host a book discussion, writing workshop at the Sault https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/airgood-will-host-a-book-discussion-writing-workshop-at-the-sault/ Fri, 22 Oct 2021 16:04:38 +0000 https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/airgood-will-host-a-book-discussion-writing-workshop-at-the-sault/ SAULT STE. MARY – Michigan author Ellen Airgood will be hosting events at the Bayliss Public Library as well as Island Books & Crafts later this month, which are free and open to the public. From 1:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m. on October 29, Airgood will be at Island Books & Crafts for a reading, […]]]>


SAULT STE. MARY – Michigan author Ellen Airgood will be hosting events at the Bayliss Public Library as well as Island Books & Crafts later this month, which are free and open to the public.

From 1:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m. on October 29, Airgood will be at Island Books & Crafts for a reading, Q&A and book signing for their new novel titled “Tin Camp Road”.

In the book, set in the Upper Peninsula, a young single mother and her 10-year-old daughter weather the trials of rural poverty and find the community they need to survive. Airgood said her love for the people and places of the Upper Peninsula inspired her to write this book, which took about seven years to complete.

“I see a lot of courage and courage and a lot of humor and humility in the people of the Upper Peninsula, I see calm and deep struggles that are not often reflected in current literature,” Airgood said in a E-mail. “I see pride, independence and creativity. I see people whose voices I would like to hear as a reader. I wanted to open a window for people from other places and from all walks of life to take a look at a way of life that they might not know or understand very well.

Airgood grew up in Michigan’s thumb and went to Ann Arbor to attend college. She said that while these places will always feel like home, she fell in love with the Upper Peninsula when she was in high school. Airgood stayed with a friend at her family cabin on Round Lake near Curtis and said she was captivated. This sense of captivation occurred again when she was a college student, attending a forest camp near Iron River, and once again while camping at Pictured Rocks.

The author from Michigan eventually moved to Grand Marais, where she and her husband currently own a restaurant. The couple work 80 to 100 hours a week together most of the year. Here, Airgood has served tables, cooked, prepared meals and placed orders and more for 30 years. During this time, she said that she had met a lot of people and had interacted with them. While she hasn’t incorporated anyone she has met at work directly into her novel, Airgood is sure that she has incorporated her sense of how people are, what they do and say into her work.

“The biggest challenge was not giving up,” Airgood said of the hardest part of writing “Tin Camp Road”. “The main character, Laurel, was not easy to get to know. I wandered for a long time, trying to figure out what was at stake for her, what she wanted more than anything, what could prevent her from getting it. I overcame this obstacle by being stubborn, I guess. The more I got to know Laurel and Skye, Mary Lynn and Sam, Naomi and Hugh, the less I could afford to give up their book.

Although Airgood has her hands full with dinner, she has wanted to be a writer since she was 10, a desire that has never gone away. She said for a long time that the motivation came from this urge and this need. Sometimes, however, that’s not always enough to sustain a novel, so she’s found that it’s usually the characters themselves that motivate her to keep going. Airgood said she “came to feel responsible to and for them”.

As for finding time to write, Airgood said it was a difficult question. She gets up early in the morning when working on a writing project. She has the freedom to choose her schedules and sets long deadlines. While his writing hangs in the busiest restaurant seasons, Airgood hopes to prepare another book over the years.

Following her move, Airgood believes the Upper Peninsula has turned her into a tougher and kinder person at the same time.

“Life is often far from easy here, but there is a lot to learn on rough roads,” Airgood said.

Michigan author Ellen Airgood.

She attributed the widening of her mind and imagination to the authenticity of the people, the beauty and immediacy of the woods and water.

Airgood is no stranger to the Sault, having traveled here to stock up on supplies, visit friends and go shopping. The sense of the story here is something she admires. She said she looks forward to meeting readers and sightseeing downtown and hopes to have time to grab a gyroscope at Zorbas or an espresso with a meal at Penny’s Kitchen.

At the October 29 event, attendees can expect a lot of interaction with the audience. Airgood said she doesn’t like giving speeches or talking about herself, but loves meeting readers and writers. She loves to hear their questions and she says she always tries to answer them honestly.

“I hope that many readers will enjoy ‘Tin Camp Road’, whether it’s to get a new perspective on life for them or to see some of their own experiences reflected in the job,” Airgood said.

At 6:30 p.m. on October 28, Airgood will host a workshop on the importance and potential of the front lines at the Bayliss Public Library. High school students and adults are welcome to attend.

Airgood urges novice novelists to read, to be confident and humble at the same time, to strive to learn what makes writing strong and what makes it weak, to write about what is important to you, to find your best working time, set a schedule and stick to it. Most importantly, enjoy the writing process.

For more information on Ellen Airgood, visit www.ellenairgood.com.

– Contact reporter Taylor Worsham at tworsham@sooeveningnews.com.


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Colorado Artists in Recovery Uses Creative Workshops to Fight Addiction https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/colorado-artists-in-recovery-uses-creative-workshops-to-fight-addiction/ Thu, 21 Oct 2021 10:02:00 +0000 https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/colorado-artists-in-recovery-uses-creative-workshops-to-fight-addiction/ When Darin Valdez was working as a sobriety counselor a few years ago, a young man walked into his downtown Denver office crying and screaming. Then he asked Valdez for a sheet of paper. The man disappeared into the basement of the Sobriety House with the paper, and after about an hour Valdez assumed he […]]]>


When Darin Valdez was working as a sobriety counselor a few years ago, a young man walked into his downtown Denver office crying and screaming. Then he asked Valdez for a sheet of paper.

The man disappeared into the basement of the Sobriety House with the paper, and after about an hour Valdez assumed he was gone for the day.

“I went downstairs and he was wrapping this green paper around the coffee straws we had there. And I looked over his shoulder, and he had a whole bunch of these origami paper lilies, ”Valdez said. “And I looked at his face, and he was calm and he was smiling and I thought, ‘this is what we need. “‘

Colorado Artists in Recovery founder Darin Valdez holds an origami flower bouquet made by a former customer on Monday, October 18, 2021 in Denver. Colorado Artists in Recovery is a free creative expression workshop serving artists, musicians and writers in the recovery community who have achieved at least 24 hours of sobriety. (Olivia Sun, The Colorado Sun)

Encountering origami that day is one of the many reasons Valdez recently created Colorado Artists in Recovery, which offers creative expression workshops for people recovering from addiction and other health issues. mental. Isolation, depression and overdose death during the COVID-19 pandemic prompted Valdez to accelerate his plan to launch the new organization in January.

“I’m heavily involved in the recovery community and go to a celebration of life every two weeks,” he said, referring to the dozens of funerals he attended during the pandemic.

Through his work as a former recovery counselor, Valdez has noticed a trend: Many people in recovery often struggle with social anxiety and find it difficult to seek help, so they turn to art or musical instruments to help them recover from addiction and other mental health issues.

“Some of them would bring their musical instruments, and they would play them, and that would be the only way for them to calm down,” Valdez said of clients at Sobriety House, where he previously worked, a treatment center. based in Denver. offering affordable services to people seeking lifelong sobriety.

Many life experiences have led Valdez on the path to founding Colorado Artists in Recovery, a free Denver-based workshop that supports people who have at least 24 hours of recovery. Their friends, family and loved ones are also invited to join the six-week program.

“There are people who are recovering from a lot of things,” said Valdez, who has been sober for seven years. “We are trying to get back to substance use, but we have found that the community – our community – has so many people who are striving for inclusion, community and finding their true selves.”

In his first year as Executive Director and Founder of Colorado Artists in Recovery, Valdez offered 15 six-week workshops for anyone in recovery looking for a community with similar experiences. It hires teachers, who are also recovering, to lead classes, each typically offered to 10 to 12 students at a time.

Wil Snyder (left) gives a one-hour keyboard class, “Speaking the Language of Music & Recovery” on Monday, October 11, 2021 in Denver as part of a free six-week music program offered by Colorado Artists in Recovery. (Olivia Sun, The Colorado Sun)

At a recent workshop, seven students were in a music class led by Wil Snyder, a pianist who plays 13 other instruments.

“When I teach music to people, I teach them music. But when I teach these classes, I teach people to connect with themselves, overcome their fears, and learn how music and playing music can help you heal in different ways, ”said Snyder.

“Sometimes sobriety is not enough,” he said. “It wasn’t for me. I needed something else, and having a community of creative people was exactly what I needed.

In a recent workshop, Snyer acknowledged that fear can arise when students practice the skills they learn in the classroom, on their own at home.

People sometimes lift their own emotional barriers to learning music, he said. “I’m not good enough. I can’t do this. I have no talent. What do people think of me?”

The same emotions can arise for people during their recovery, he added. Learning to overcome emotional barriers during a music class can help people deal with those same emotions when they arise during sobriety, Snyder said.

When Shannon Green joined Colorado Artists in Recovery six weeks ago, she was at a “really low point” in life, but was looking for community after a romantic relationship ended. Through the recovery workshop, she faced childhood trauma, while struggling to fight an emotional eating habit, she said. Other course participants also encouraged her to seek mental health counseling, she said.

“I’m better than I was because looking at my old diaries that I used to write, they were so sad about how I feel today,” she said. , just before the start of the workshop on a Monday. night earlier this month.

“The struggles that I had before, I wouldn’t say they have resolved just yet,” she said. “Basically over 19 years old doing the same thing over and over again – it takes a while to get over that.”

Harrison Edwards, a musician for 15 years, had to leave Texas, his home state, to begin his recovery. Many of his friends back home suffered from substance use disorders, and alcohol was present in most of the musical jobs he had been hired for.

“Drinking was part of my job,” he said. “It’s something I did at work. I did it everyday.

“And that was the main way I met musicians and did the creative things that I do. It was all connected – the work I did, my creative goals and the use of alcohol and drugs, ”he said. “So I’m looking for opportunities and ways to keep doing the things that matter most to me, and meeting like-minded people is very important, especially in recovery.”

The nonprofit Caring for Denver The Foundation helps fund Colorado Artists in Recovery and a few other programs that tackle addiction and mental health issues through the arts and creative expression. For example, Caring for Denver also helps fund Art from Ashes, a program that has engaged nearly 14,000 Colorado youth over the past 16 years. Art from Ashes works with young people who have experienced abuse, poverty and other hardships.

Valdez hopes to offer 18 workshops next year, including dance, creative writing, singing and meditation. Valdez is also asking community members to donate money, musical instruments and other art supplies to the association.

“What we are looking for help for is to find a place to live, a place where people can still go and they will know we will be there,” he said. Community members keen to provide long-term space for the group are encouraged to contact Valdez, the founder and executive director.

On October 25, the students of the current workshop will perform in a recital, to celebrate the end of their Colorado Artists in Recovery experience. The free event is not open to the public, but relatives are encouraged to join.

“We’re doing this because we want them to see how many people are like them,” Valdez said. “It really helps change the stigma surrounding recovery and gives them the opportunity to shine… It’s a simple night out, but I hope it will encourage them to keep pushing forward on their journey to release. the addiction.”

Shannon Green (left) participates with other students in a one-hour keyboard class, “Speaking the Language of Music & Recovery” on Monday, October 11, 2021 in Denver as part of a six-hour free music program. weeks offered by Colorado Artists in Recovery. (Olivia Sun, The Colorado Sun)

Four workshop participants interviewed earlier this month, including Dusty Rose and Spencer Thompson, said they hope to continue their music studies and plan to stay in touch with their classmates after the program ends.

“The reason this program exists is because people were in a dark place, and it takes people from that dark side that we all have and teaches them to find their light,” Rose said.

The value of workshops often extends beyond students battling their demons. Sometimes the teachers in the group also get help.

Snyder, the piano teacher at the current workshop, said he had had mental health issues earlier this month and was about to enroll in a mental institution.

“I didn’t do it because I knew I had this (class) coming up,” he said earlier this month. “Honestly, just talking with a few people, being here and sharing this story, I feel so much better again.”


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Library hosts workshop on starting a home business https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/library-hosts-workshop-on-starting-a-home-business/ Sat, 16 Oct 2021 11:09:53 +0000 https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/library-hosts-workshop-on-starting-a-home-business/ The Bartlesville Public Library is offering a free workshop for adults who want to learn the basics of starting a home business at 11 a.m. on October 19 in Meeting Room A. Larry Thrash, who is SCORE’s Bartlesville branch manager, is the presenter. He received a BA from the University of Ouachita and an MBA […]]]>


The Bartlesville Public Library is offering a free workshop for adults who want to learn the basics of starting a home business at 11 a.m. on October 19 in Meeting Room A.

Larry Thrash, who is SCORE’s Bartlesville branch manager, is the presenter. He received a BA from the University of Ouachita and an MBA from the University of Memphis.

Thrash served in the Advanced Weapons Support Command in Germany as a lieutenant in the United States Army. After leaving the military, Thrash co-founded an oil and gas drilling and completion company in Bartlesville before becoming a banking consultant.

He has served as President of the Tri County Tech Strategy Center and is a Certified Business Incubator Manager. Since his retirement, Thrash has continued his entrepreneurial journey with several local businesses.

This program will include an informal discussion and general overview of topics such as required permits and licenses, setting up an office, business planning and financing. The program will also be broadcast live on Facebook Live. Registration is not compulsory. The program is free and open to the public.

For more information, call the library reference office at 918-338-4168.


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