lot people – David Hemmings Bird Photography http://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/ Sun, 20 Mar 2022 05:55:52 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-2021-06-25T155134.587.png lot people – David Hemmings Bird Photography http://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/ 32 32 Jenks’ K-pop artist AleXa is grateful to represent Oklahoma at NBC’s “American Song Contest” | Television https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/jenks-k-pop-artist-alexa-is-grateful-to-represent-oklahoma-at-nbcs-american-song-contest-television/ Sun, 20 Mar 2022 05:00:00 +0000 https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/jenks-k-pop-artist-alexa-is-grateful-to-represent-oklahoma-at-nbcs-american-song-contest-television/ Oklahoma men’s basketball teams have been excluded from March Madness, but you can still scout for other Oklahoma talent in a national “tournament.” “American Song Contest” is a live music contest that begins at 7 p.m. on Monday, March 21 on NBC. Hosted by Snoop Dogg and Kelly Clarkson, “American Song Contest” features 56 musical […]]]>

Oklahoma men’s basketball teams have been excluded from March Madness, but you can still scout for other Oklahoma talent in a national “tournament.”

“American Song Contest” is a live music contest that begins at 7 p.m. on Monday, March 21 on NBC.

Hosted by Snoop Dogg and Kelly Clarkson, “American Song Contest” features 56 musical artists – one from each of the 50 states, plus the District of Columbia and five US territories. A state or territory will emerge victorious.

Oklahoma’s representative in the battle royale is AleXa, a K-pop artist from Jenks.

“It’s honestly something beyond my wildest dreams,” she said. “It’s just amazing, and I’m so grateful for this opportunity.”

“American Song Contest” will feature entrants from a wide range of styles and genres, as well as artists at different stages of their careers. Among the “names” in the field are Jewel (Alaska), Michael Bolton (Connecticut), Sisqo (Maryland) and Macy Gray (Ohio).

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AleXa, who was asked if she’d be impressed with any of her contestants, said, “On the one hand, Macy Gray is an amazing performer, and I really hope to get to see her in person at through the show. But, to be blunt with you and completely honest, I’m most excited about Michael Bolton. I grew up listening to his music, and I’m going to be so impressed if I see Mr. Bolton.

And you have to compete with him.

“I know! It’s a bit terrifying, but it’s an honor to go into battle with Michael Bolton.

AleXa graduated in 2015 from Jenks High School, where she was Alexaundra Schneiderman, but, in a phone interview before the premiere of “American Song Contest”, she said people in her hometown know her as Alex. Christina.

A lifelong dancer, she was first drawn to K-pop because of her strong performance identity, according to her “American Song Contest” biography. She left Oklahoma for Korea at the age of 21 to pursue her career, which sounds brave.

“It wasn’t so brave it was just, I guess, a leap of faith if you will, because this wonderful company found me and I had all my faith in them and I was so ready and can’t wait to start following my dream,” she says. “It was just this golden opportunity that I could never pass up.”

Alexa took the opportunity. In 2019, she made her multilingual K-pop debut with “Bomb,” which has received nearly 22 million views to date and reached No. 7 on Billboard’s worldwide digital song sales chart.

She said her following is “more global than domestic,” but added that K-pop fans are everywhere these days.

American magazine Seventeen recently asked her to participate in a “17 questions” video that she shared on social media.

“I’m just very happy to represent K-pop in general for this competition, but of course through my home country,” she said.

It would have been on-brand — perhaps even stereotypical — if a country music artist had been selected to be Oklahoma’s delegate to the “American Song Contest.” Alexa was shocked when she found out she had been chosen. She has no information on how or why.

She said there were wonderful stars from Oklahoma, including Carrie Underwood and Garth Brooks.

“Even the All-American Rejects come from Oklahoma. I found out,” she said. “But how did you end up with me, a K-pop artist? I do not know. Just pure luck, I guess. But I’m grateful for the opportunity to showcase a different side of what Oklahoma has to offer, and I’m just proud to represent the state.

“American Song Contest” is based on a foreign predecessor. “Eurovision Song Contest” is an international songwriting contest with a history of 65 years and is watched by 200 million viewers every year. Past winners include ABBA (1974) and Celine Dion (1988).

The US version will feature qualifying rounds, semi-finals and a grand final over an eight-week period. Regardless of AleXa’s progress, “American Song Contest” should provide a significant increase in exposure. On a recent trip home, she filmed a promotional video for the show in downtown Tulsa.

AleXa said she’d like to think she’s a “pretty competitive” person. Example?

“Well, the way my career even started was basically through a competition, and that’s how I first met my company,” she said. “So through competition I was able to fulfill my dreams, basically.”

Nearly one million fan votes made her the winner of “Rising Legends,” an online talent contest, and she was catapulted to “Produce 48,” the most competitive audition show in Korea.

The “American Song Contest” format calls for AleXa and other contestants to pitch original songs. AleXa has a background in songwriting, but she said the process of creating songs for the show is a team effort that includes amazing producers.

“Launching a new series is always a massive undertaking, but putting together one that involves the production of 56 original songs is a Herculean task,” said Audrey Morrissey, the series’ executive producer. “Selecting the right label partner to join us was crucial, and we found the perfect partner in Atlantic Records.

“We can’t wait for viewers to experience new music from our incredibly talented artists across the country and help decide America’s next great song.”

Atlantic Records will release songs featured in the series starting March 21.

Because “American Song Contest” is broadcast live, there is no recast. Alexa said she practices for the show every day and was nervous from day one: “My brain is so nervous.”

Besides herself, who is happiest to have been chosen to be part of the series?

“Oh, man. There’s a lot of people who have supported me through this. On the one hand, I’m definitely thinking of the CEO of my company. He’s really happy to see how far we’re getting with this, but also my mother.

“As I represent Oklahoma, that’s where she grew up despite being from Korea, so I’m really proud to represent my Korean heritage and my Korean roots for my fans and my family.”

Tulsa World Scene: New Frankoma Pottery to Open in Glenpool

jimmie.tramel@tulsaworld.com

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Photographer Sergey Makarov recounts a terrifying escape from Mariupol https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/photographer-sergey-makarov-recounts-a-terrifying-escape-from-mariupol/ Thu, 17 Mar 2022 21:27:02 +0000 https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/photographer-sergey-makarov-recounts-a-terrifying-escape-from-mariupol/ On February 24, I woke up to a friend calling me. He said the war had started. He suggested that I move with my family to Ivano-Frankivsk. I refused. It seemed to us that Mariupol was a safe place at that time. Many Ukrainian defense and military equipment had appeared since 2014. Then, on February […]]]>
On February 24, I woke up to a friend calling me. He said the war had started. He suggested that I move with my family to Ivano-Frankivsk. I refused. It seemed to us that Mariupol was a safe place at that time. Many Ukrainian defense and military equipment had appeared since 2014.

Then, on February 26, air raid sirens began to sound in the city. The suburbs came under fire, but in the city center where I lived, it was calm. I thought it would be like during the war in 2014 — two houses would suffer and it would be over. At that time, many people left. You don’t know how much I envied them.

Things had started to heat up. Every day got worse.

On March 1, I realized that it was getting harder and harder to leave Mariupol. Russian troops began to take control of the city’s roads.

On March 3, electricity and water were cut off. I haven’t washed since March 4. Since then, we can only wash our hands in cold water. The mobile connection has disappeared. We couldn’t communicate. And we were forced to walk towards each other and share information.

The looting had already begun. In the first days of the war, I bought food and about 100 liters of gasoline. This is what ultimately saved us. In the beginning, I helped people move from the outskirts of the city to the center.

On March 5, the gas supply to the houses was cut off. It was the only thing we had left for lighting and heating. Before it was cut, we could at least warm ourselves with tea. After that, the nightmare began. It was -9C (about 16F) outside at night. In the afternoon, -2 or -3C (28 or 27F). At the same time, we were hiding from bombs and airstrikes in a bomb shelter. We cooked food over fires. Trees were sawed off in the yard. We couldn’t warm up. No words can describe what it was.

People cook on a grill on March 11.

People charge their phones using a Red Cross generator on March 9.

At first, there were only residents of our house in our shelter, but more and more people arrived. There were 100 people in a space of 150 square meters, including young children.

It’s a concrete basement with no light or ventilation. As long as we could, we burned kerosene and candles. Luckily we had a toilet.

All the while, I was trying to contact people out of town, charging my phone from the Red Cross generator. A lot of people accepted the fact that the connection was gone, but I wasn’t ready to give it up. From March 6 to 9, there was no connection. For a moment, I thought we had been forgotten.

On March 8, the worst began. Russia began to launch airstrikes. First with an interval of a few hours, then every minute. Several times we didn’t have time to reach the shelter and fell to the ground to save ourselves.

A damaged shop window is seen on March 9.

The city has been constantly bombarded for weeks.

I wanted to take my family, but I would only have one try. If they stopped us and brought us back, there wouldn’t be enough gas to go out a second time. Those who went for evacuation on March 5 spent the night in their cars and then returned to Mariupol. They came back and found themselves without gasoline.

On March 13, my friends told me that it was possible to exit via the old Berdyansk road. But there was a mined checkpoint and you had to go around the mines. We decided to take the risk rather than stay in the city to die.

On March 14 at 12:45 p.m. we left in a column of eight cars. There was no baggage, only people and animals. There were six people in our car. Along the way we saw mines and carefully avoided them.

Inside a damaged building on March 13.

A woman pulls a cart on a snowy sidewalk on March 9.

At one of the Russian checkpoints, the soldiers told us with a sneer: “It’s your fault that this happened in Mariupol. You didn’t have to show up.

We had to spend the night in Berdiansk. The Russians at the checkpoint told us that the city was under a curfew, “Moscow time”. So we couldn’t leave.

On March 15 we left Berdiansk for Zaporizhzhia. There were about 20 Russian checkpoints along the way. They checked our luggage, phones, messages, laptops.

Within hours we reached the Ukrainian checkpoint and were free. Now we want to go as far west as possible.

See more photos from the Russian invasion of Ukraine

Darya Tarasova contributed to this report.

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‘Their weapon is your shame’: Toxic abuse by Nigerian loan sharks | Nigeria https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/their-weapon-is-your-shame-toxic-abuse-by-nigerian-loan-sharks-nigeria/ Wed, 09 Mar 2022 09:19:00 +0000 https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/their-weapon-is-your-shame-toxic-abuse-by-nigerian-loan-sharks-nigeria/ SHayo Adebayo, an unemployed 28-year-old medical physiology graduate from southwestern Nigeria, read dozens of abusive WhatsAapp messages and voice notes sent to her by fast loan company debt collectors. “I will destroy your life,” said one. “I want to see your payment or all hell will break loose,” said another. Another, which simply said “enjoy […]]]>

SHayo Adebayo, an unemployed 28-year-old medical physiology graduate from southwestern Nigeria, read dozens of abusive WhatsAapp messages and voice notes sent to her by fast loan company debt collectors.

“I will destroy your life,” said one. “I want to see your payment or all hell will break loose,” said another. Another, which simply said “enjoy your shame”, arrived after a message calling her a fraud and a thief was sent to her family, friends and all her contacts, together with a photo extracted from her Facebook page.

Adebayo said the messages had been coming to her phone almost every day since October, prompting her to have suicidal thoughts.

She is not alone in her anguish. Unemployment, inflation and the cost of living have risen sharply in recent years in Africa’s biggest economy, fueling a thriving industry of fast – or payday – loans. Advertisements for quick loans appeared at bus stops and street corners and were played on the radio.

Messages like those sent to Adebayo’s contacts have gone increasingly viral on social media, drawing attention to the companies’ attempts to harass and shame people struggling with debt.

For months, Adebayo had relied on regular loans of 40,000 naira (£70) from a Lagos-based loan company, to pay for transport and food until payday. In October, she lost her job and her debts skyrocketed.

Between October and December, Adebayo downloaded 32 quick loan application forms onto her phone as she struggled to cover her debts.

“At first I was just borrowing to get to the end of the month,” she said. “Then I would borrow to pay off the loan, then I would borrow more to pay that one and so on. By the end, I had borrowed from so many apps. »

A woman balances a bowl containing soft drinks as she weaves through a street in the Yaba district of Lagos on Tuesday. Photograph: Akintunde Akinleye/EPA

Adebayo said that as she began to struggle to repay her debts, the payment reminders quickly turned into grim threats, first sent to her and then to almost everyone important in her life.

As a condition for a loan, the application process required access to her contacts, social media accounts, family and friends, where she worked, worshiped and lived.

“By the time you take the loan, you are practically naked. They know everything about you,” she said. “So when you’re not able to pay, they start working on those contacts.”

The debt collectors constantly called and texted and broadcast WhatsApp messages to his phone contacts. “Their weapon is your shame,” she said. “That’s why they do it. They use it to reach you.

Calls for the government to clamp down on the companies have multiplied. Many are accused of operating without registration and warning employees not to reveal details of their operations, according to former employees.

Some of the loan companies enforce illegal terms, paying below minimum wage and encouraging abusive behavior, according to several former staffers.

Sophie Olubode worked as a debt collector for months last year at a quick loan company which employs more than 150 people and is based in an unmarked office building in Lagos.

She called the work environment “toxic”. Olubode said many employees were paid a base salary below the Nigerian minimum wage of just 30,000 naira per month and received bonuses based on debt collection targets. Every collector was pressured to take extreme measures, she said.

“I remember one of my co-workers called a daughter’s father and told him that his daughter was at the police station and until the father paid the amount of the debt they would not release not the girl,” she said.

In typical cases, people applied for loans for as little as 2,000 naira, she said, often to cover things like food and transport costs and medical expenses. The application process, she said, worked “like a trap”, and for many people, unpaid debts of as little as 500 naira quickly amounted to thousands.

The Lagos skyline.  Advertisements for fast loan companies have popped up in the city and elsewhere in Nigeria.
The Lagos skyline. Advertisements for fast loan companies have popped up in the city and elsewhere in Nigeria. Photography: Eye Ubiquitous/Alamy

Most of Adebayo’s debts remain unpaid, but she said she turned a corner when she found support on a Facebook group used by 19,000,000 people, many of whom were in similar or worse situations. Stories of abuse and harassment are reported daily.

Group members encourage others to pay off their debts but not to be overwhelmed by threats. Documents produced by loan company agents claiming to be from the police are being debunked and people are sharing posts where they responded to threats with jokes or taunts.

“Some of the talks are actually funny,” Adebayo said. “They joke about it. It makes you feel like, ‘OK, I can handle this, they can’t kill me’.

The Facebook group was founded by Willis Osunde, 32, an unemployed economics graduate, following his own ongoing experiences with fast loan companies.

“When they defamed me, by sending messages to my contacts, I almost lost everything,” Osunde said. “My marriage, my family, my job, all at the same time. It started from 2019, until last year… It occurred to me that I might not be alone. Osunde always reimburses.

In November, Nigerian financial crime and central bank authorities set up a “lenders’ task force” to investigate the rise of loan sharks, as regulators became increasingly active in prosecuting companies accused of harassment and fraud. ‘abuse. Victims of illegal practices were encouraged to contact the task force, although many members of the Facebook group felt more urgent action was needed.

“People are still vulnerable to these companies,” Osunde said. “In this economy, a lot of people are desperate.”

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Vincent Medrano: Photographer and skateboarder | 39under39 https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/vincent-medrano-photographer-and-skateboarder-39under39/ Sun, 27 Feb 2022 01:30:00 +0000 https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/vincent-medrano-photographer-and-skateboarder-39under39/ Vincent Medrano started skateboarding seven years ago, but wasn’t serious until an influential art teacher and a photography class. Medrano studied photography and loves it. Combining it with skateboarding was easy. He used his iPhone and a tripod as he learned how to perfect the look he wanted to achieve and set up the proper […]]]>

Vincent Medrano started skateboarding seven years ago, but wasn’t serious until an influential art teacher and a photography class.

Medrano studied photography and loves it. Combining it with skateboarding was easy. He used his iPhone and a tripod as he learned how to perfect the look he wanted to achieve and set up the proper angles. Medrano was his own test subject, taking pictures of himself while skateboarding.

“A lot of people don’t see all the work behind photography and skateboarding,” he said. “You work really hard to set yourself up for two or three seconds of good shots from a grind or a round.”

However, Medrano does not consider himself a skateboard photographer. He hangs out with his friends and they do a lot of skateboarding. “I capture my friends, no skating,” he said. His friends share his work for personal use.

He has contributed skateboarding and model photos to New Yak City, a downtown Yakima business, and has an ongoing project with a new store, Apple Valley Emporium.

Continuing his photography career, Medrano established a relationship with Seattle recording artist Ejfly, documenting video shoots and live performances.

“I like to do both, find people who skate and make music. I want to find them before they go off and work with them to create an ongoing relationship.“

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Talented Independence Artist Gets Her Work Recognized https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/talented-independence-artist-gets-her-work-recognized/ Tue, 08 Feb 2022 04:35:50 +0000 https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/talented-independence-artist-gets-her-work-recognized/ INDEPENDENCE, Mo – Evelyn Neal is a young black artist based in Independence, Missouri, and she wants to use her talent to bring the stories of black historical figures to life. “I feel like over the last few years a lot of people either don’t know about some of our black icons or forget about […]]]>

INDEPENDENCE, Mo – Evelyn Neal is a young black artist based in Independence, Missouri, and she wants to use her talent to bring the stories of black historical figures to life.

“I feel like over the last few years a lot of people either don’t know about some of our black icons or forget about them,” Neal said.

Neal said she wasn’t always passionate about art and she didn’t choose the life of drawing – the art of drawing chose her. She now just uses pen, pencil and paper to draw characters like Michelle Obama, Kobe Bryant and Sandra Bland.

“I draw them in pencil and then I grid them in pen,” she said.

Since then, Neal’s work has become a hit among his Independence community and stars, with celebrities such as Lauren London and Ice Cube praising his work on social media.

One of her proudest moments is seeing her art featured in Independence’s first-ever Black Excellence Exhibition at the Community Services League’s BlendWell Café through the end of the month.

She said she draws each portrait with a mission: “To speak to anyone who sees it, whether it can represent a specific event or even a song.”

“You look directly into their eyes, you can almost see what they’re trying to tell you,” she said.

Nearly 50 of his intricate portraits now shine in the showcase gallery. She said it only took her 24 hours to complete them all from start to finish.

Expo organizers said there was a lot of black talent to be discovered at Independence and some of them could be discovered at the Expo.

“We want to tell the story of the artist that we have here, the excellence that we have here, but also to share the story that many of us don’t know,” said Jennifer Manuleleua of the Community Services League. .

Neal said that while she can complete a portrait in what some might call lightning speed, the impact of black history has taken years to unfold, and it is her responsibility to tell their stories. stories.

“I will continue to speak on behalf of the black community,” she said. “Whether through art, community service, anything, I am important to my community and will continue to share the story of many people.”

To learn more about Evelyn Neal’s work, visit her Facebook page.

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A photographer’s constant search for the spontaneous https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/a-photographers-constant-search-for-the-spontaneous/ Thu, 27 Jan 2022 16:34:43 +0000 https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/a-photographers-constant-search-for-the-spontaneous/ I first picked up a camera at 14, fueled by an obsession and love for photography. And I’ve had that same drive ever since. These images are excerpts from my ever-growing personal work. Images that don’t always have a rhyme and a reason or even a purpose other than to satisfy my desire to do […]]]>

I first picked up a camera at 14, fueled by an obsession and love for photography. And I’ve had that same drive ever since.

These images are excerpts from my ever-growing personal work. Images that don’t always have a rhyme and a reason or even a purpose other than to satisfy my desire to do something fun and maybe create something I’ve never done before. How about we try this? What will it look like upside down, or with this color, or in total darkness? Often I try to come up with an absurd idea or get inspiration from other images, TV shows, movies and everyday life.

I see humor and beauty in many things, especially people. I am a natural person. I often say that I try to make extraordinary images from ordinary, ordinary people. I practice on my friends and associates almost all the time. Luckily for me, I have access to a lot of people who don’t mind being photographed. Without them, I wouldn’t be as happy as I am.

They trust me to experiment with them on camera. This allows me to play with various lighting techniques, accessories and concepts. I never know exactly how something is going to turn out until I’m knee-deep in the process or when the photoshoot is over. And I’m in awe at the end, just like the subject.

I love how spontaneous this way of making art can be. Truly organic. This feeling is addictive. Force a habit to do more photo shoots. The challenge is always to try not to repeat the same thing, but to look at something from a different angle. Literally trying to do the impossible.

Styling: Cherie Scurry-Burns. Makeup: Sharron Bullock.

Brianna Williams, 31, and Christian Davis, 25, both of Maryland, got engaged in October 2022 and welcomed their son, Azure, four months ago. For their maternity shoot, stylist Cherie Scurry-Burns was inspired by themes of Mother Earth and the Garden of Eden. The pose of the couple, on the other hand, evokes the symbol of yin and yang, a deliberate choice by Joseph, inspired by their infinite love for each other. “They are each other’s yin to yang,” he says. “I really wanted that to show through in the photographs.”

For this image, Joseph was inspired by a “photo giant”: Albert Watson. The fashion photographer’s image of a ballet dancer wrapped in fabric prompted Joseph to create his own version. “I loved the movement of the fabric, the way it ebbs and flows and mimics liquid once it’s suspended in the air,” Joseph says. Pictured: model Malon Chandler of Fredericksburg, Virginia.

Styling: Cherie Scurry-Burns. Makeup: Sharron Bullock.

In 2020, a California production company called Circadian Pictures held a contest for artists to create works centered around the coronavirus. Joseph jumped at the chance to enter. With stylist Cherie Scurry-Burns and makeup artist Sharron Bullock, he creates SheRo (model Maya Corey from Washington), who, along with his sidekick, Headress, will save humanity from the pandemic. “What if a superhero could save us?” Joseph asks. The image was a finalist in the competition.

My fascination with angels led me to take this last photo,” writes Joseph. “I feel like the angels not only watch us but also save us quite often without our knowledge,” he says. “I’ve had a few car accidents where I only came away with a few scratches – I credit divine intervention, of course.” He gathered a few of his friends for a photoshoot, using large wings to evoke various moods. Pictured is model David Carter from Washington.

It would be so much easier if I could speak their language,” Joseph says, joking about the challenge of photographing animals. This particular photoshoot was hilarious because the dog, Hershey, was extremely rambunctious. Luckily Megan Jones, owner of Furever Fab dog shop, had dog snacks on hand. She and Hershey had a great relationship. “Hershey followed Megan everywhere she went – and it’s not even her dog!” said Joseph. Jones had borrowed it from a friend for the photo shoot. Joseph says he enjoys photographing the bond between people and pets. “Such incredible loyalty from the pet and the pet owner is love the world needs every day,” he says.

Joseph is always on the lookout for eye-catching props to use in photo shoots. He spotted this mask at a Halloween-themed store — and he knew it would fit in with his quirky shooting style. “I’ve always been drawn to weirdness, but with respect,” he says, adding, “This eyeball mask is just for the money. Its weirdness is why I love it so much. For decades month, he was looking forward to using it for a fashion shoot.The opportunity arose when 28-year-old Brandon Metz, aka DJ Fade the Future, came over from the New York area to take pictures for his model portfolio.

Joseph kept his promise to his friend Donna Holley-Beasley, a local makeup artist, to do a photo shoot for her. Here, model Liliana McGee, 18, of Bowie, Maryland, wears a piece of hooded fabric that stylist Jodie Johnson brought on set. Liliana looked natural on camera, using fabric to create movement — which can add a lot to a photo, notes Joseph. “I love the feelings it can evoke, especially when it comes to chiffons and silks,” he says. “In some cases, it may look like liquid floating in the air.”

While brainstorming for a photo shoot with his friend and stylist Cherie Scurry-Burns, Joseph had an idea. Step 1: Grab all the animal print clothes and accessories you can think of. Step 2: Take makeup artist Sharron Bullock with you. Step 3: Head to the Eastern Market. Joseph loves how the neighborhood almost feels “that Cherie is in Paris, a place famous for her taste in clothes.” The outing was a thrill for the trio: “As a team, we always do photo shoots for other people, and that day was our turn just for fun.”

Joseph met 28-year-old DeVonte Thomas at a restaurant a few years ago, and they quickly became friends. When Thomas, a professional basketball player from the International Basketball Federation (FIBA), decided to pose for a photoshoot, Joseph knew exactly what he would be focusing on. “I’ve always admired people with tattoos,” Joseph says. “I wish I had the courage to get a tattoo. Instead, I live vicariously through other people with ink. They are walking works of art and expression.

For a photoshoot with model Monica Ajak, stylist Cherie Scurry-Burns came up with an unconventional approach: a gold face mask. Joseph was lukewarm about the concept, but he remained open: “Bring it on and I’ll see what happens,” he recalls saying. But during filming, he decided to go another direction and asked Ajak to take off the mask. As she began to remove it, Joseph said, her reaction caught his attention. “The harder she pulled, the better her expression was,” he says. The result: one of his favorite images to date.

It’s not often that Joseph puts makeup artist Sharron Bullock on camera. Cherie Scurry-Burns styled the clothes and worked out the hair. Bullock added smoke from his vape pen for added drama. “It was an afternoon playing on set and trying to create something visually unique,” ​​Joseph explains. The three often work together on photo shoots, and their team chemistry is evident in this photo.

I believe angels walk among us disguised as mere mortals,” Joseph said. He has worked on and off for the past few years on an angel-themed photo series with his friends, including Malon Chandler of Fredricksburg, Virginia. To capture this moment, Joseph had Chandler run through the grass and jump through the air. — dozens of times. “That picture ended up being one of my favorites,” Joseph says. “He looks like he’s coming – his toes are about to hit the ground.”

When makeup artist Donna Holley-Beasley wanted to film her work, she turned to Joseph. For this shoot, they brought in three models, each with different skin tones to show off the Holley-Beasley lineup. The trio included Alexis Wilkerson, pictured here. “Alexis has a regal way of behaving,” Joseph says, “and I wanted to take advantage of that character on camera.” The fabric – a move inspired by stylist Jodie Johnson – adds a touch of mystery.

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A professor talks about the COVID-19 outbreak and his inspiration for photography – The Connection https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/a-professor-talks-about-the-covid-19-outbreak-and-his-inspiration-for-photography-the-connection/ Thu, 27 Jan 2022 01:58:45 +0000 https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/a-professor-talks-about-the-covid-19-outbreak-and-his-inspiration-for-photography-the-connection/ Professor Patty Felkner was worried and uncertain about her photography lessons when the COVID-19 outbreak hit.Felkner, who was a professor of photography at Cosumnes River College for 30 years, prides herself on being a happy person in life because she can do what she loves as a profession and is able to share that love. […]]]>

Professor Patty Felkner was worried and uncertain about her photography lessons when the COVID-19 outbreak hit.
Felkner, who was a professor of photography at Cosumnes River College for 30 years, prides herself on being a happy person in life because she can do what she loves as a profession and is able to share that love. with his students.
In March 2020, Felkner and his colleague took their beginner photography classes to San Francisco for a field trip. Weird talk about the bus ride home grew among students about the coronavirus, as they weren’t sure if the outbreak would affect them.
Upon returning home, the CRC announced that they had to close in-person classes as it was unsafe for them to continue due to the coronavirus outbreak. This forced all classes to be taught online overnight.
“He just stopped and it was so immediate,” Felkner said. “I was so worried about my family and my students.”
Felkner’s voice had become a little shaky as he thought back to the start of the closings. “I was terrified,” she said.
“She always saw the good in people,” said photography professor Kathryn Mayo, who has been a colleague of Felkner at CRC for 14 years.
Mayo said she admired Felkner for who she was as a colleague and a person and always had a big smile when talking about her.
“I was able to learn so many things working with her,” Mayo said. “I see her not only as a colleague, but also as a mentor and a friend.”
Mayo said she felt she had the right partner to tackle the challenges they would face in remote learning with Felkner’s experience and vision for how students can learn.
One of the many students Felkner has touched is Neezy Jeffery, who majors in photography and has known Felkner since the spring of 2020.
Jeffery is a former student of Felkner and is now his teaching assistant. She said she chose to be Felkner’s nanny because she had a lot of gratitude and respect for her.
Jeffery got to experience both how Felkner teaches before and during the pandemic.
“She went above and beyond in that moment,” Jeffery said. She also said she thought Felkner was always open to her students and always made sure they were okay and learning to the best of their abilities.
“She doesn’t just treat you like a student, she treats you like a person,” Jeffery said. “She treats you like you’re an artist and that’s something you don’t really get going.”
Felkner said his love for photography started with his father, as he was an amateur photographer with a camera.
“He had a camera and I followed him around and eventually he let me use it and so I got really into photography when I was in high school,” she said. “But it had to do with him and his love for him.”
Felkner said the students are what make CRC special for her.
“We have a lot of diversity both ethnically, culturally, age and disability, CRC seems like such an open place,” Felkner said. “I learned so much from my students.”
She also said that her colleagues are also what makes the school special.
“A lot of people who complain about their jobs complain because they don’t really like the people they work with,” Felkner said. “But for me, I really like the people I work with and so it’s also a lot of fun to be at work.”
Most CRC in-person classes will remain online to begin the spring semester until February 22. Felkner said she understands the decision to push back in-person classes due to the recent spike in COVID cases in the Sacramento area, but looks forward to returning to class with her students in the safest way possible.

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Photography: Images that Speak – Hindustan Times https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/photography-images-that-speak-hindustan-times/ Sat, 15 Jan 2022 17:27:28 +0000 https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/photography-images-that-speak-hindustan-times/ Pick your favorite celebrity wedding photos from the past five years and chances are they’ve all been clicked by Joseph Radhik and his team: Nick Jonas’ reaction to finding his name in Priyanka Chopra’s mehendi, Vicky Kaushal and Katrina Kaif sharing a quiet moment against the backdrop of a sunset, or Virat Kohli lovingly kissing […]]]>

Pick your favorite celebrity wedding photos from the past five years and chances are they’ve all been clicked by Joseph Radhik and his team: Nick Jonas’ reaction to finding his name in Priyanka Chopra’s mehendi, Vicky Kaushal and Katrina Kaif sharing a quiet moment against the backdrop of a sunset, or Virat Kohli lovingly kissing Anushka Sharma’s forehead. Radhik’s unblinking lens ensured we were privy to some of the most intimate, unfiltered moments from these big Indian weddings.

“My photos are not art. The first reaction I expect from you is ‘awww!’, and that you smile. I see weddings as manifestations of love, and nothing else. And my only requirement is that you have a good time,” says Radhik.

Radhik’s photographs are not the laboriously posed, carefully orchestrated weddings that weddings have become notorious for. Looks like they were clicked by a friend who is part of the gang.

This is a photo taken during Priyanka’s mehendi where all the aunts are there and Nick found her name on her hand. It’s shot with the camera right in there. I love how this image breaks down boundaries. Until then, every celebrity photo was taken from a certain distance. But here, the camera is right in the middle of the action. And it’s extraordinary (Joseph Radhik)

Friend with benefits

“This is precisely the idea behind our efforts: what would your wedding look like if it were photographed by your friend? We are paid to be that friend! Radhik smiled, continuing, “When you dance in your baraat, I have to be a baraati, not a foreigner. I need to be part of the emotion to capture the emotion.

What makes all his images so perfect? “It’s the skill and the nerd in me,” laughs the 38-year-old photographer.

Radhik runs Stories, a 23-member team of 11 photographers and filmmakers whom he has hand-picked and trained. And their USP is those precious split-second moments. “We do not retouch our photos. They look perfect because of the emotions they capture. If you check, you will find a lot of imperfections,” he reveals.

“Getting the perfect moment is more important than creating a technically perfect image. Photography is 5% skill, 5% your gear and 90% being there. not to be there physically, you have to be completely there emotionally,” says Radhik.

Joseph describes this photograph as “so simple and yet so captivating”. It’s the kind of photo he says he always wanted to do, the kind that has no gimmicks or effects, just beauty in the purest sense (Joseph Radhik)

Origin story

Becoming a professional photographer had never been part of Radhik’s career plan. He grew up as a typical Hyderabad boy who after completing his engineering education went to business school and after getting an IIM degree joined a corporate job.

“Photography has always been a hobby. I got my first digital camera while I was still studying engineering. It was a present from my father. I would only photograph sunsets and insects! he’s laughing.

But when his parents task him with finding a wedding photographer for his sister’s wedding, a world opens up to him.

Tips from Joseph Radhik

“It was December 2008. I had been in love with photography for eight years, but I hadn’t even heard of a genre called wedding photography! Radhik shakes his head.

He clicked a few snaps at his sister’s wedding, but being the bride’s brother was the full-time job. However, it piqued his interest in the genre. “Between 2008 and 2009, I would go to my day job and spend the first two hours sitting in my cubicle looking at wedding photos. I was hooked!” said the nerd.

Then, in December 2009, Radhik took a photo at a friend’s wedding and uploaded it to his Flickr page. This single photo earned her her first wedding photoshoot. And that would become his turning point.

The shooting star !

Radhik quit his day job in October 2010 to become a professional photographer. A fortnight later, her story was on CNN IBN. The media coverage led him to share his story and his vision at various seminars, and during one of these conferences he met a friend of Allu Arjun, who invited him to film the wedding of the Telugu idol.

Josephy says, “Our images are perfect because of the emotions they capture. We do not retouch our photos. The image may not be photographically perfect, but people are blown away by the sheer joy it captures; it is their sheer happiness that makes the images of Rajkummar-Patralekha so glorious! (Shivali Chopra)

“It was March 2011. Even being a Telugu boy, I had no idea how tall Bunny was; I hadn’t watched any of his films! laughs Radhik, who then filmed another extended family wedding, that of actor Ram Charan Teja, first cousin of Allu Arjun and son of Telugu superstar, Chiranjeevi.

Radhik convinced his brother, two years his senior and a business school graduate, to join him. Together they formed Stories. It was December 2012. By then, Radhik had photographed four of the biggest weddings of the year. But Joseph Radhik’s images didn’t become a household name until five years later.

“In December 2017, we shot Virat and Anushka’s wedding, and we became a kind of mainstream brand. Everyone in India had seen those images of Virat-Anushka, there was no escaping them. ! he’s laughing.

It takes a village

Today, the Joseph Radhik brand is not a one-man show; it is a strong army of 23 members! “I have a team shooting, it’s not just me. But there is standardization, ”he explains. In fact, the marriages of Jasprit Bumrah, Varun Dhawan and Rajkummar Rao were led by Shivali Chopra, the creative director of Stories.

Joseph Radik

Until a few years ago, “wedding photographers” were not taken seriously in India. In fact, the label “wedding photographer” was almost frowned upon. “A lot of people, seeing my work, have suggested that I shouldn’t call it wedding photography, but invent a term for it. But I don’t see what to be ashamed of. It’s my identity,” he says. .

However, not everything is fun and fun. “The misconception people have about my job is that it’s a glamorous job. It’s not! Whether it’s being in haldi’s line of fire, splashing water, sitting on a muddy area for that low angle shot, jostling in a crowd during baraat, it’s all part of our job,” he says. “It’s 30% of the rigor of a sports job and 20% of that of a photojournalist. But at least we work in beautiful destinations and air-conditioned rooms!” he’s laughing.

From HT Brunch, January 16, 2022

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Join us at facebook.com/hindustantimesbrunch

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Fighting Student Loan Debt During the Pandemic https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/fighting-student-loan-debt-during-the-pandemic/ Sat, 15 Jan 2022 17:23:01 +0000 https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/fighting-student-loan-debt-during-the-pandemic/ Now, how easy was it to get that break? In terms of initially, when did the lenders release this information? Some lenders weren’t immediately on board. It was so strange. We had to ask customers to go online or call them, and then some lenders did it automatically. I will say that at this point […]]]>

Now, how easy was it to get that break?

In terms of initially, when did the lenders release this information? Some lenders weren’t immediately on board. It was so strange. We had to ask customers to go online or call them, and then some lenders did it automatically. I will say that at this point everyone who is probably eligible gets it. Now here’s the kicker: initially some loans weren’t included, but as we got the break extended, we’ve seen more loans included now inside the pandemic break. If you’re listening, if you have a federal loan and aren’t sure if your loans qualify, log on and check your lender’s website or go to studentloans.gov to see if you can get an administrative forbearance. . And if you don’t, I’ll give your lender a call. It may even be able to be applied back as well.

It freed up some money and gave you an idea of ​​what it would be like to live without that debt. What do people do with the money?

You know, student loan debt isn’t one of those things that I feel like people will happily pay off every month. They pay out of obligation, don’t they? So what that has done I feel like a lot of people have allowed them to improve their credit because now they can take that extra money and pay other bills that might have been overdue or cards of credit that have been charged. I have heard many of these success stories happen.

Now the Biden administration has promised student loan forgiveness. Do you believe that will happen? Where is it now?

I want to be so positive, Cherri, but I want my vote back. You know, the administration really surfed the student loan debt, and nothing materialized. I’m really upset, to be completely honest. It doesn’t look too good.

Yeah, a lot of people bit that carrot for sure. You’re a black woman-owned business and there’s a huge racial disparity when it comes to student loans. Could you talk about that and then talk about your own personal story?

So, you know, on average, African American women are disproportionately affected by student loan debt. And, on average, African-American women also have the most college degrees in our country. But these degrees have a really cute price. And so what’s happening is we’re seeing our African American women showing up to work with more debt than their counterparts. And so, the same salary that you as African American women can receive will be different from that of your counterpart. What I say to that is [it’s] to be celebrated, it’s exciting that they have degrees, and you know they want more for their lives in the future. But also now, as black women, we really can’t ignore student loan debt, because it affects and shows up when we want to invest, when we want to build long-term wealth. So now I feel like I’m being pressured into my community to say, “Yeah, I know you got a $400 payout or $500 payout, or an $800 payout, or a 1 $000. Let’s see how to approach this payment, but let’s not stop there. Because you are “behind the eight ball”. Maybe you don’t put a lot in your [401(k)]. Here’s what you need to do. You have to do X, Y, and Z to get caught up with your counterparts so your kids don’t have to know the words “student loan debt.”

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“NATURE ART GALLERY”: the new Pocatello boutique offers aura photographs, unique gemstones | Eastern Idaho https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/nature-art-gallery-the-new-pocatello-boutique-offers-aura-photographs-unique-gemstones-eastern-idaho/ Mon, 27 Dec 2021 20:15:00 +0000 https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/nature-art-gallery-the-new-pocatello-boutique-offers-aura-photographs-unique-gemstones-eastern-idaho/ POCATELLO – Something that started as a passionate project for a local couple is now a brick and mortar store inside Station Square on South Main Street in Pocatello. Casey and Marisa Etheredge opened Ether’s Edge in mid-November, and the business has already been a hit with downtown shoppers. The boutique looks like an upscale […]]]>


POCATELLO – Something that started as a passionate project for a local couple is now a brick and mortar store inside Station Square on South Main Street in Pocatello.

Casey and Marisa Etheredge opened Ether’s Edge in mid-November, and the business has already been a hit with downtown shoppers.

The boutique looks like an upscale art gallery and feels like it’s home in a big city, with its bright walls and high ceilings. Instead of the paintings and sculptures you’ll find in a more traditional gallery, the pillars of Ether’s Edge are rocks, minerals, and crystals in almost any color you can imagine.

The boutique’s gallery atmosphere is no coincidence either. Casey said they wanted people to feel comfortable walking into the store without feeling the pressure to buy anything.

“The most important thing that we feel as a store is that we are just there to deliver things to people,” he said. “We’re not necessarily trying to sell things. We almost say to ourselves, “This is an art gallery of nature. Come check it out. If you like it, damn it yeah. ‘”

Although they didn’t know it at the time, Casey and Marisa’s journey to opening their store began in 2015 in Sedona, Arizona.






Ether’s Edge is now open inside Station Square at 200 S. Main St., Suite F, in Pocatello.




“(It’s) when we were first on a spiritual awakening journey, so to speak,” Casey said.

During their visit, they took pictures of their auras, the electromagnetic field that would emanate from all things. The process uses a biofeedback sensor to show what a person’s aura would look like based on the energy they give off.

“We were able to learn so much more about ourselves that we decided to consider having our own system and we did,” Casey said.

Once they got their own aura photography setup – called AuraCloud 3D – in 2016, they took it on the road, selling their photo service at pop-ups, farmer’s markets, and more. events.

Around this time, they also started to make a lot of art, using precious stones in their work.

“We incorporated a lot of crystals into a lot of the resin work that we did and we kind of noticed how the crystals were making a big difference in our lives in terms of increased creativity, aiding in the anxiety, ”Casey said. “The list goes on and on on the metaphysical properties of rocks. We really started to notice how much of a difference it made to us, and we were having so much fun making our products and sourcing all over the world that we decided to try to branch out and share it with others. others.

They opened an Etsy store, but Casey said their products were selling so quickly that they couldn’t keep up.

“We started as an Etsy shop, like traveling exhibitions, doing traveling aura photography and our artwork with the crystals and gemstones, then we got the opportunity to have a brick location. and mortar, ”he said. “We were so well received at all of our events and things that it made sense for us to go for it instead of having it all in our house.”

From now on, their precious stones, in addition to their photographic aura, have their place in a welcoming space in the city center.

“It’s really nice to have a more intimate setting,” said Casey.

It’s easy to take a photo of your aura. You place your hand on a biofeedback plate for 30 seconds to a minute and let the machine do the rest.

“It measures a few different bodily functions – temperature, heart rate – but the main thing is actually the electromagnetic frequency of your pulse, which then goes into a computer algorithm, which gives an output of what your aura looks like at the moment.” , says Casey.

After taking your photo, the computer does its job and generates an image: your face covered with a rainbow of colors.






Will have

In the photo above, the auras results of Casey and Marisa Etheredge photographed. Residents of the area can now have their auras photographed at Ether’s Edge in downtown Pocatello.




“Then we give you an impression of what the colors mean in each part of your body and what that can mean emotionally, physically and spiritually,” Casey said.

Customers can choose between two options. Both come with a photo you can take home with you. Then you can choose between $ 25 for a one page report or $ 40 for a detailed 15 page report.

Casey says people’s auras are fluid, changing throughout the day or even moment to moment, although he says most people have patterns for them regardless of what happens. around them.

“We took 30 days of photos of our aura every day at certain times of the day, and we generally fall into the same kind of pattern in the morning, afternoon and evening,” he said. .

That being said, there are things that will immediately change someone’s aura.

“My wife and I like to do little experiments with it,” he said. “We’re going to read someone, and then if you tell them a joke and they laugh, their whole aura will change.” If I put one of my children on my wife’s lap, her aura will change. Depending on what you think, feel, the moment will definitely determine the colors.

For the Etheredges, a big advantage of self-employment is being able to spend more time with their families. Their children – two daughters aged 7 and 5 and a boy aged 2.5 – will be able to grow up helping their parents run the family business.

“It’s really important for us to make sure that we include our family in everything we do,” said Casey. “So it’s really a way for us to be together as a family all the time, full time, as much as possible. That would be where the passion came in as being self sufficient and being able to stay together as a family while having our art and the things we love being able to be what provides us.

Marisa and Casey are from Pocatello – Highland High School graduates and high school sweethearts.

“We are very happy to raise (our children) here and involve them with us,” Casey said, adding that it was not uncommon for her eldest daughter to help out in the store.

Casey says they got lucky and ended up renting the most visible space in Station Square. They had been looking for a physical location for their business for some time, but he said their other prospects had all failed.

He was once at another business inside Station Square – Blades Salon and Spa – getting his son’s hair cut when the topic of his business came up in a conversation with the stylist.

“I just mentioned our company, that we did a lot of touring shows, and she said this space was going to be available for hire and I should talk to Denis (Clijsters, who owns the building),” Casey said. . “I gave him a call and it was like the next day he showed me the space and we got the lease. It was a really, really cool kind of occasion.

The store name is a play on the couple’s last name, but it also has a deeper meaning.

“Ether is considered to be one of the five basic elements – earth, wind, water, fire, ether,” Casey said. “The ether is sort of the spiritual element or the middle element, not physical, so to speak. So Ether’s Edge is kind of playing on the borderline between the physical and the non-physical. “

He continued, “Your aura exists in the etheric realm. A lot of crystals and gems, a lot of the energy that they emit would kind of be considered etheric energy since you can’t see it. but you can feel it. “

Casey’s favorite gemstone right now is Malachite with Chrysocolla – a blue-green stone.

“It’s usually two different minerals, but we found a source where the chrysocolla is deposited in the malachite and it’s really, really, really amazing,” he said. “At the moment, we only have pieces for our personal collection. We’re trying to get more for the store.

The Etheredges source their gemstones from all over the world, but mainly from South America and Africa.

You might think they could get their gemstones from Idaho – famous, the State of Gems – but Casey said that was a misnomer.

“Idaho has a greater variety of gemstones than anywhere else in the world outside of Africa, but the quality and size is generally on a lower scale,” he said. “… The United States has a lot of good things, but the United States doesn’t. It’s not mine for crystals most of the time. So you have these big mines that mine for ores. “But the crystals are sort of disposable. In South America there are huge companies that specifically mine for the crystals. They don’t dig for the ore.”

Since opening, Casey says the community has been receptive to them and the business is off to a good start.

“One of the main reasons we decided to open a store is because we feel like somehow everyone has a connection to the rocks – be it that their grandfather was a hunting dog or they remember going camping and picking up rocks with their dad. or cousins ​​or whoever, “he said.” It seems that something about them just draws people in, brings back memories and makes them happy. People come to the store and they’re always in a good mood and it’s really nice. So it was very, very, very well received and nothing but positive feedback from everyone.

While he and Marisa believe their rocks and gems can have positive effects on someone’s mind, he says he also understands that a lot of people just like to look at them and that’s okay too.

“This is also how we started,” he said. “We just thought, ‘Oh my God, this is just an amazing piece of art from nature,’ and then we started to learn more and more and to do research. They are beautiful. They are really fun.

Ether’s Edge is located inside Station Square at 200 S. Main St., Suite F, and is open from noon to 7 pm Tuesday through Saturday. For more information or to book an aura photography session, visit ethersedge.com. The company can also be found on Facebook and Instagram, @EthersEdge.


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