high school – David Hemmings Bird Photography http://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/ Sun, 20 Mar 2022 05:55:52 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-2021-06-25T155134.587.png high school – David Hemmings Bird Photography http://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/ 32 32 Jenks’ K-pop artist AleXa is grateful to represent Oklahoma at NBC’s “American Song Contest” | Television https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/jenks-k-pop-artist-alexa-is-grateful-to-represent-oklahoma-at-nbcs-american-song-contest-television/ Sun, 20 Mar 2022 05:00:00 +0000 https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/jenks-k-pop-artist-alexa-is-grateful-to-represent-oklahoma-at-nbcs-american-song-contest-television/ Oklahoma men’s basketball teams have been excluded from March Madness, but you can still scout for other Oklahoma talent in a national “tournament.” “American Song Contest” is a live music contest that begins at 7 p.m. on Monday, March 21 on NBC. Hosted by Snoop Dogg and Kelly Clarkson, “American Song Contest” features 56 musical […]]]>

Oklahoma men’s basketball teams have been excluded from March Madness, but you can still scout for other Oklahoma talent in a national “tournament.”

“American Song Contest” is a live music contest that begins at 7 p.m. on Monday, March 21 on NBC.

Hosted by Snoop Dogg and Kelly Clarkson, “American Song Contest” features 56 musical artists – one from each of the 50 states, plus the District of Columbia and five US territories. A state or territory will emerge victorious.

Oklahoma’s representative in the battle royale is AleXa, a K-pop artist from Jenks.

“It’s honestly something beyond my wildest dreams,” she said. “It’s just amazing, and I’m so grateful for this opportunity.”

“American Song Contest” will feature entrants from a wide range of styles and genres, as well as artists at different stages of their careers. Among the “names” in the field are Jewel (Alaska), Michael Bolton (Connecticut), Sisqo (Maryland) and Macy Gray (Ohio).

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AleXa, who was asked if she’d be impressed with any of her contestants, said, “On the one hand, Macy Gray is an amazing performer, and I really hope to get to see her in person at through the show. But, to be blunt with you and completely honest, I’m most excited about Michael Bolton. I grew up listening to his music, and I’m going to be so impressed if I see Mr. Bolton.

And you have to compete with him.

“I know! It’s a bit terrifying, but it’s an honor to go into battle with Michael Bolton.

AleXa graduated in 2015 from Jenks High School, where she was Alexaundra Schneiderman, but, in a phone interview before the premiere of “American Song Contest”, she said people in her hometown know her as Alex. Christina.

A lifelong dancer, she was first drawn to K-pop because of her strong performance identity, according to her “American Song Contest” biography. She left Oklahoma for Korea at the age of 21 to pursue her career, which sounds brave.

“It wasn’t so brave it was just, I guess, a leap of faith if you will, because this wonderful company found me and I had all my faith in them and I was so ready and can’t wait to start following my dream,” she says. “It was just this golden opportunity that I could never pass up.”

Alexa took the opportunity. In 2019, she made her multilingual K-pop debut with “Bomb,” which has received nearly 22 million views to date and reached No. 7 on Billboard’s worldwide digital song sales chart.

She said her following is “more global than domestic,” but added that K-pop fans are everywhere these days.

American magazine Seventeen recently asked her to participate in a “17 questions” video that she shared on social media.

“I’m just very happy to represent K-pop in general for this competition, but of course through my home country,” she said.

It would have been on-brand — perhaps even stereotypical — if a country music artist had been selected to be Oklahoma’s delegate to the “American Song Contest.” Alexa was shocked when she found out she had been chosen. She has no information on how or why.

She said there were wonderful stars from Oklahoma, including Carrie Underwood and Garth Brooks.

“Even the All-American Rejects come from Oklahoma. I found out,” she said. “But how did you end up with me, a K-pop artist? I do not know. Just pure luck, I guess. But I’m grateful for the opportunity to showcase a different side of what Oklahoma has to offer, and I’m just proud to represent the state.

“American Song Contest” is based on a foreign predecessor. “Eurovision Song Contest” is an international songwriting contest with a history of 65 years and is watched by 200 million viewers every year. Past winners include ABBA (1974) and Celine Dion (1988).

The US version will feature qualifying rounds, semi-finals and a grand final over an eight-week period. Regardless of AleXa’s progress, “American Song Contest” should provide a significant increase in exposure. On a recent trip home, she filmed a promotional video for the show in downtown Tulsa.

AleXa said she’d like to think she’s a “pretty competitive” person. Example?

“Well, the way my career even started was basically through a competition, and that’s how I first met my company,” she said. “So through competition I was able to fulfill my dreams, basically.”

Nearly one million fan votes made her the winner of “Rising Legends,” an online talent contest, and she was catapulted to “Produce 48,” the most competitive audition show in Korea.

The “American Song Contest” format calls for AleXa and other contestants to pitch original songs. AleXa has a background in songwriting, but she said the process of creating songs for the show is a team effort that includes amazing producers.

“Launching a new series is always a massive undertaking, but putting together one that involves the production of 56 original songs is a Herculean task,” said Audrey Morrissey, the series’ executive producer. “Selecting the right label partner to join us was crucial, and we found the perfect partner in Atlantic Records.

“We can’t wait for viewers to experience new music from our incredibly talented artists across the country and help decide America’s next great song.”

Atlantic Records will release songs featured in the series starting March 21.

Because “American Song Contest” is broadcast live, there is no recast. Alexa said she practices for the show every day and was nervous from day one: “My brain is so nervous.”

Besides herself, who is happiest to have been chosen to be part of the series?

“Oh, man. There’s a lot of people who have supported me through this. On the one hand, I’m definitely thinking of the CEO of my company. He’s really happy to see how far we’re getting with this, but also my mother.

“As I represent Oklahoma, that’s where she grew up despite being from Korea, so I’m really proud to represent my Korean heritage and my Korean roots for my fans and my family.”

Tulsa World Scene: New Frankoma Pottery to Open in Glenpool

jimmie.tramel@tulsaworld.com

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MATC Times award-winning photographer promoted – MATC Times https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/matc-times-award-winning-photographer-promoted-matc-times/ Wed, 16 Mar 2022 16:26:20 +0000 https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/matc-times-award-winning-photographer-promoted-matc-times/ Photo by Trevor Keay/MATC Times A student in the photography program, Céline Cotton is finishing her first year in college as a photo editor for The Times. Cotton was unanimously elected by the Times editorial board to succeed graduate photo editor Andi Clunie. Andre Harris time contributor Victoria Magee Chief Editor Note: Originally printed in […]]]>

Photo by Trevor Keay/MATC Times

A student in the photography program, Céline Cotton is finishing her first year in college as a photo editor for The Times. Cotton was unanimously elected by the Times editorial board to succeed graduate photo editor Andi Clunie.

Andre Harris

time contributor

Victoria Magee

Chief Editor

Note: Originally printed in vol. 61 of the print edition of the MATC Times.

Times editor Victoria Magee has appointed Celine Cotton as the newspaper’s photo editor.

Cotton, a sophomore in photography, joined the paper in the fall 2019 semester. “I originally joined The Times during new student orientation,” she said. “Victoria had mentioned they were looking for photographers, and in my mind I just thought ‘that’s me!’ Because I was homeschooled, I knew when I went to college , I wanted to fully immerse myself in. I had looked to see what clubs and things were on offer to see if I could get to know people, but there was nothing to do with photography or any of my interests. So The Times seemed like a great idea. She added.

During the school year, Cotton contributed to a multitude of photojournalism assignments, including Perspectives, Portraits and Sports. One of those assignments, “The Fiserv Forum Tour Takes Visitors Behind the Scenes,” earned him high accolades in the state. Cotton won honorable mention for photography in the Wisconsin Newspaper Association Foundation’s Better Newspaper competition. A great honor considering she was competing against students from four-year schools including Marquette University and the University of Wisconsin.

“I guess I would say it was unexpected.” Said Cotton. She adds that she remembers being told her photographs were up for a competition, but she didn’t think she would get very far.

“I knew by the time some people get to college, they’ve been practicing what they’re studying,” Cotton added. “I only bought my first camera a few months before the start of the school year, so when I was told that I had won an award for my images, I was really surprised. And to be surprised, I was really excited that someone else saw my pictures and completely enjoyed them. It was a bit of a confidence booster,” Cotton said.

The photography student feels positive about her new position and expects this year to have good results. Cotton also recognizes the unique challenges due to the pandemic, but sees it as an opportunity for growth.

“The last semester has been stressful,” Cotton said. “I know college is hard enough when you’re a full-time student, going to work part-time or full-time, and you’re also in a school organization of some kind. However, add a pandemic into the mix and it makes things much more complicated. The only advantage I think I have here is that I was homeschooled from elementary to high school, I’m used to an online format for school and I’m used to having a certain level of self-study (I 100% prefer in people classes),” she said.

“With the Times, I’m trying to figure out all the photo editor responsibilities. I think I should be able to do it, I just have to get used to it,” she said.

Cotton came to school with a unique background. She was homeschooled from kindergarten to grade 12 and originally wanted to pursue a dance degree at UW-Whitewater. She was also a “dance/choreography” instructor in the Wauwatosa Recreation Department. Cotton is trained in ballet, tap, hip hop and jazz.

Cotton says one of the biggest benefits of homeschooling was her schedule. Stating that she had the opportunity to create her own schedule.

“Creating my own schedule allowed me to do things that people my age (20) usually couldn’t do since they would be in class (like teaching dance lessons in the afternoon)” , she said. Cotton says another positive was being able to learn at your own pace.

“If I needed more time on a topic or concept, I could have it, or if I understood that topic or concept quickly, then I could move on. Some days I finished school as early as 10 a.m., while other days I didn’t finish school until 6 p.m. I preferred 10 a.m.,” she explained.

Cotton says the biggest downside to being homeschooled was socializing. “For some people that aspect isn’t great, but I’m a very social person,” she said.

After graduation, she plans to become a professional photographer. She hopes to travel the world and photograph her adventures, while being paid to do so.

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CYO Cheerleading: Our photographers captured 79 stunning shots from Saturday’s Borough Championships (PHOTOS) https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/cyo-cheerleading-our-photographers-captured-79-stunning-shots-from-saturdays-borough-championships-photos/ Sun, 13 Mar 2022 20:42:17 +0000 https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/cyo-cheerleading-our-photographers-captured-79-stunning-shots-from-saturdays-borough-championships-photos/ The Staten Island CYO Cheerleading Championships are in the books. Saturday’s event at the CYO-MIV Center in Pleasant Plains was the first time the CYO cheering event was back indoors since 2019, and by all accounts it was a huge success. Twenty-five high school teams of all ages gave their best after months of practice […]]]>

The Staten Island CYO Cheerleading Championships are in the books.

Saturday’s event at the CYO-MIV Center in Pleasant Plains was the first time the CYO cheering event was back indoors since 2019, and by all accounts it was a huge success.

Twenty-five high school teams of all ages gave their best after months of practice and endless routines. Congratulations are in order for all the winning teams and their coaches. But really, everyone who participated and organized the event coming out of the pandemic is to be congratulated.

Of course, SILive.com and the Advance were there with lightning coverage from senior sportswriter Charlie DeBiase Jr. and sharp photographers Derek Alvez and Annie DeBiase.

Related content

CYO SI Varsity Cheerleading Winners

CYO SI Debs Cheerleading

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Alvez and Annie DeBiase were sure to capture the big moments and spirit of the day as they brought back over 100 photos of the best action.

In the end, they settled on the top 79 photos above in the gallery.

From Monday March 14, the subscribers will be able to buy a photo for free (one of the advantages of being a subscriber), while non-subscribers will have to pay a small fee.

Enjoy the gallery by scrolling down and seeing all the photos in one place now!

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Beyond Beyoncé fame, Awol Erizku expands what black art can be https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/beyond-beyonce-fame-awol-erizku-expands-what-black-art-can-be/ Thu, 10 Mar 2022 17:36:00 +0000 https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/beyond-beyonce-fame-awol-erizku-expands-what-black-art-can-be/ LOS ANGELES — Admittedly, Awol Erizku is perhaps best known for his smug photo of a pregnant Beyoncé, which in 2017 was the most liked post in Instagram history. And Erizku has taken many other memorable celebrity images, including young groundbreaking poet Amanda Gorman for the cover of Time and “Black Panther” actor Michael B. […]]]>

LOS ANGELES — Admittedly, Awol Erizku is perhaps best known for his smug photo of a pregnant Beyoncé, which in 2017 was the most liked post in Instagram history. And Erizku has taken many other memorable celebrity images, including young groundbreaking poet Amanda Gorman for the cover of Time and “Black Panther” actor Michael B. Jordan for GQ.

But in a recent interview at his sprawling studio in downtown Los Angeles, Erizku, 33 – wearing Dr Martens on his feet and a floppy hat over his dreadlocks, as Ethiopian pianist Emahoy Tsegué-Maryam Guèbrou played on the high -speakers – said he considers himself an artist first, one who also works in painting, sculpture and video installation.

“It’s something I’m adamant about,” he said. “I am not a photographer for hire.”

The desire to bring Erizku’s work to the attention of the wider art world is part of what fueled Gagosian director and curator Antwaun Sargent’s desire to give him the Park Avenue space. of the gallery for an exhibition on March 10.

“Awol is one of the black avant-garde photographers who says that limits don’t apply to the realities or the conditions in which we make images,” Sargent said. “It’s a refreshing perspective to have, especially when it comes to photography’s overwhelmingly white history.”

“How are we as an art world to ignore this?” Sargent continued. “You have photographers in Lagos, London, Johannesburg, New York and Los Angeles who create images that defy easy categorization and emphasize black desire, black beauty and black community. For me, it is significant. »

Erizku’s exhibition, ‘Memories of a Lost Sphinx’, features six photographs of light boxes in a black-painted interior with a mixed-media sculpture that reimagines the Great Sphinx of Giza as an amalgamation of Egyptian, Greek, and Egyptian influences. and Asians. There’s also a golden disco ball, “Nefertiti” – Miles Davis, in the form of the Egyptian queen.

“I deconstruct the mythological components that make up the Sphinx,” Erizku said. “It’s important to me to create confident, powerful and downright regal images of black people.”

Sargent has known Erizku since interviewing him for Complex magazine about his “The Only Way Is Up” exhibit in 2014. Erizku said he felt an immediate comfort with him, feeling “for the first times, I didn’t have to explain the work”.

Born in Ethiopia and raised in the South Bronx – Erizku describes himself as “projects” – he got into trouble in middle school and said, “Art was the only way out for me”.

A draftsman and doodler, he went to the High School of Art and Design in Manhattan, started out doing medical illustrations and took a camera to Cooper Union, where in 2010 he earned his Bachelor of Fine Arts.

During her third year at Cooper Union, Erizku riffed on Vermeer’s “Girl With a Pearl Earring,” creating the “Girl With a Bamboo Earring” photograph, featuring a black woman in a large shaped earring. of Hearts, which caught the public eye (one edition sold at Phillips Auction House in 2017 for $52,500).

From there he went to Yale, where he studied with photographer Gregory Crewdson and earned his MFA in 2014. Erizku was particularly inspired by the work of artists like Richard Prince, Jeff Wall, Roe Ethridge, Marcel Duchamp and David Hammons – “the ones who worked outside the margins,” he said.

But early on, he mastered the world of social media by treating Instagram like his gallery, selectively opening his feed to the public at set times.

In 2012, he took part in a collective exhibition at the Flag Art Foundation and then had two personal exhibitions at the now closed Hasted Kraeutler gallery in Chelsea before joining Ben Brown in London and Hong Kong and then the Night Gallery in Los Angeles. He is currently unrepresented in the United States, although he remains with Brown overseas.

“The artwork has aesthetic appeal – you want to look at it,” said collector Glenn Fuhrman, Flag founder and longtime supporter of Erizku’s artwork. “But there’s always a lot more going on below the surface.”

Some members of the art world have already noticed this. Public Art Fund, in 2017, showed Erizku’s work on Wi-Fi kiosks in the five boroughs as part of the “Commercial Break” exhibition.

In 2019, curator Allison M. Glenn included Erizku on her “Small Talk” show at the Crystal Bridges Museum in Bentonville, Ark. “The power of her practice is that she has multi-point accessibility for many different people,” Glenn mentioned. “It takes recognizable symbols and moves them around. It is the history of art. That was the paint job.

Last year, Public Art Fund featured 13 of Erizku’s photographs on bus shelters across New York and Chicago in an exhibition called “New Visions for Iris” which included a still life dealing with mass incarceration and a portrait by Michael Brown Sr.

“It’s part of a conversation about art history,” said Daniel S. Palmer, curator of the fund, “from Old Masters to contemporary imagery of our current moment.”

The Gagosian exhibit is significant, Sargent said, in part because it expands the notion of what black art can be at a time when black portraiture has become the rage of the market.

“The art world has flattened the ways Blackness works,” Sargent said. “Doing exhibitions like this helps expand beyond an overemphasis on figurative painting,” though he noted that figurative work is valid.

He added that it was a way to carry on a conversation “beyond some of the fashionable black-figure notions.”

Sargent pointed to the long-awaited recognition of black photographers such as Anthony Barboza as well as Ming Smith and the 1960s band Kamoinge, recently featured at the Whitney. “We have to use every strategy to make sure our images are seen and appreciated,” he said, “because frankly the art world didn’t care.”

Presenting Erizku in the Gagosian Park & ​​75 space — a storefront visible from the street — gives the exhibition significant accessibility. “With more black artists than ever, there is still a problem with museums and galleries attracting these audiences to see the work of members of their community,” he said. “There are a lot of barriers to getting into the art world.”

Erizku often incorporates wildlife into his images – he has photographed hip-hop star Nipsey Hussle with a horse, Michael B. Jordan with a hawk and a wolf; Gorman with a bird (now chirping in a cage near Erizku’s studio window). He said he was inspired early on by Joseph Beuys’ radical 1974 performance – ‘I love America and America loves me’ – in which the German artist spent a week in his dealer’s gallery , fenced with a live coyote.

Erizku’s labor costs are low for a major gallery owner like Gagosian, with pieces selling for between $40,000 and $60,000. But Sargent said it was essential for top-notch galleries to showcase fresh perspectives. “If we are honest in saying that we want to ensure that all voices are represented in the art world, we seriously need to provide platforms for artists who think in ways that deviate from traditional notions around the art world. creating images,” Sargent said.

To some extent, Erizku has bypassed the Guardians, given that he’s been presenting his own shows on social media for years. His main interest, said the artist, is to be able to communicate and elevate black images, whether it’s actress Viola Davis, African masks, nail salon hands, Ethiopian sex workers or basketball player Kevin Durant.

“I want to be remembered for black imagination,” Erizku said, “for pushing the boundaries of black art.”


Awol Erizku: Memories of a Lost Sphinx

March 10-April 16, Gagosian Park & ​​75, 821 Park Avenue, Manhattan. 212-796-1228; gagosian.com.

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Learn Writing Techniques at Ada Long Summer Workshop 2022 – News https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/learn-writing-techniques-at-ada-long-summer-workshop-2022-news/ Wed, 09 Mar 2022 18:08:27 +0000 https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/learn-writing-techniques-at-ada-long-summer-workshop-2022-news/ During the Ada Long Creative Writing Workshop, high school students work closely with nationally acclaimed novelists, essayists, and poets to compose original pieces. Incoming high school students have the opportunity to attend the 2022 Ada Long Creative Writing Workshop Summer Camp at the University of Alabama at Birmingham. Over three weeks, 30 students will work […]]]>

During the Ada Long Creative Writing Workshop, high school students work closely with nationally acclaimed novelists, essayists, and poets to compose original pieces.

Incoming high school students have the opportunity to attend the 2022 Ada Long Creative Writing Workshop Summer Camp at the University of Alabama at Birmingham. Over three weeks, 30 students will work with nationally acclaimed authors and explore Birmingham’s rich culture and history.

Each week, students will explore a different genre such as poetry, fiction, memoir, and magazine production by writing, critiquing, and revising original work. Their work will then be published in The Writers’ Block, an annual anthology.

The camp will take place at the UAB Spencer Honor’s House from June 13 to July 1 and sessions will last from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. The cost of the camp is $800 and participants can pay an additional $357 for an optional hour of college credit. . Full and partial scholarships are available for students who find the fees prohibitive.

The camp is sponsored by the English Department of UAB’s College of Arts and Sciences and is named for Ada Long, Ph.D., founding director of UAB’s honors program and former professor of English at UAB.

For more information and to apply for this year’s camp, click here.

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The photographer plays an important role in high school diplomas https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/the-photographer-plays-an-important-role-in-high-school-diplomas/ Sat, 05 Mar 2022 16:02:25 +0000 https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/the-photographer-plays-an-important-role-in-high-school-diplomas/ Victor Moreno speaks to a subject during a recent photo shoot. [Justin Griffin] Victor Moreno has shot dozens of covers for InMaricopa magazine, but in terms of volume, magazine photos represent only a small percentage of his work. He takes pictures at all kinds of community events. Sometimes the City hires him for events; other […]]]>
Victor Moreno speaks to a subject during a recent photo shoot. [Justin Griffin]

Victor Moreno has shot dozens of covers for InMaricopa magazine, but in terms of volume, magazine photos represent only a small percentage of his work.

He takes pictures at all kinds of community events. Sometimes the City hires him for events; other times he captures events in his spare time. When people see Victor coming with a camera, they know it’s time to smile. He shares photos on his Facebook page.

But at the start of 2020, when the COVID-19 pandemic hit the Maricopans hardest, there weren’t many people smiling.

The pandemic hit in the spring and some people started losing their jobs. As a result, out-of-work parents suddenly called Victor to cancel or postpone scheduled graduation portraits for their children.

“They were telling me they couldn’t afford it because the husband lost his job and the wife was the only one working, or vice versa,” Victor said.

Graduating from high school is a special time for children around the world. That year was disappointing for many, as the annual debut at Ram Stadium would be canceled, with graduates picking up their degrees in a drive-in ceremony. And then the photos in hats and dresses cherished by parents were in danger for some.

In many ways, the portraits represent the final chapter in the childhood of these children and their parents.

Victor wanted to help. He wanted to make a difference in the lives of these families.

“I felt bad for them,” Victor said.

The inspiration came from Linette Caroselli, a local teacher. She sponsored the first graduate, paying for the photos of a graduate whose family could not afford it in difficult times, and showed Victor how he could advance in a way that helped everyone.

“She called me and said, ‘Can I sponsor a child?’ “recalls Victor. “She told me there was a family she was taking care of that they couldn’t afford to pay, but she wanted to give it to them as a gift.”

A good deed blooms
Hoping to restore some semblance of normalcy for graduates and their families, Victor found a way to involve the community — to ensure more families could get portraits.

First, he cut his photography rates in half, then he asked local businesses to sponsor more children.

And while the program launched two years ago aimed to help families who had gone through a difficult time during the pandemic, it has blossomed into something much bigger.

In 2020, Victor and local businesses put 65 children through his lens who likely would have gone without professional portraits. Last year the number was 98. And this year it will top 100. He still does the work at 50% off, and local businesses and individuals pay the balance. For example, this year Global Water will sponsor five graduates.

But now his efforts go beyond a needs-based program. It became a way for people in the community to do something nice for their neighbors.

Some benefactors sponsor a graduate or two matching interests they had in high school.

“I have a person who wanted to sponsor a student who participated in a group,” Victor said. “I contacted the high school guidance counselor and we found a suitable student.”

Some business owners use the arrangement as an opportunity to thank employees. If they have a worker whose son or daughter is a graduate, they will sponsor the student.

In other cases, portraits are paid for by a family friend of the graduate.

Personalized photo shoots
Although these photoshoots normally last around an hour, there is a lot of work behind the scenes. The effort begins weeks before the first photo is taken.

Victor learns about the students and tries to conceptualize a suitable photo shoot. Then, after identifying a place and a theme, he organizes the time and place of the shoot.

To see Victor work is to see an artist in his element. He takes the time to talk to graduates and build relationships with them. He makes these graduates, and basically everyone who walks in front of his camera, feel like a million bucks. It’s their day in the spotlight.

It is important, he explained.

“I’ll tell them about their college plans or anything they plan to do after graduation. I want them to feel comfortable,” Victor said. “I want them to look relaxed in their photos.”

After the actual shooting, there is work to be done to process the photos. And later he catches up with the parents and delivers the photos.

This year, his annual project started the first week of February. He works long hours to get most of the shots before the graduation ceremony.

Until then, there is no free weekend for Victor.
And he didn’t want it any other way.

This story was first published in the March issue of InMaricopa magazine.

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Francesca Woodman’s photography https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/francesca-woodmans-photography/ Fri, 04 Mar 2022 00:11:11 +0000 https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/francesca-woodmans-photography/ One of the most attractive photographers of the 20and century, Francesca Woodman’s images are fleeting and ephemeral, executed with ghostly fragility and startling innocence. Poignant and surreal, at times nightmarish and intensely dark, his photography speaks to the mind, haunts the heart with a feverish honesty not too often found in this material world. Renowned […]]]>

One of the most attractive photographers of the 20and century, Francesca Woodman’s images are fleeting and ephemeral, executed with ghostly fragility and startling innocence. Poignant and surreal, at times nightmarish and intensely dark, his photography speaks to the mind, haunts the heart with a feverish honesty not too often found in this material world. Renowned for her black-and-white portraits that often featured their creator as the subject, Woodman’s images are made all the more visceral by the fact that the artist’s life was so tragically cut short. We only have what Francesca left behind, but it is by no means a work that is missing. In fact, quite the opposite.

Untitled, Providence, Rhode Island, 1975-1978, vintage silver print. Image: 7 3/8 x 9 1/2in. (18.6 x 24cm). Courtesy of Woodman Family Foundation and Marian Goodman Gallery © Woodman Family Foundation / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York, 2021

The Marian Goodman Gallery in New York, in collaboration with the Woodman Family Foundation, organized the recent solo exhibition, Francesca Woodman: Alternate Histories, which featured many previously unseen photographs of the artist. The gallery has worked closely with the Woodman family for over two decades, and their work to preserve its legacy has been of the utmost importance.

Francesca Stern Woodman was born on April 3, 1958, in Denver, Colorado, into an exceptionally artistic family. Her father, George, was an abstract painter and her mother, Betty, a potter. Although not known in the art world, the Woodmans encouraged Francesca and her brother, Charlie, to fully immerse themselves in creativity. They also spent much of their time living in Italy, and in 1975 the Woodmans purchased an old stone farmhouse in the Florentine countryside, where the family would spend their subsequent summers. Francesca was an avid reader, which, coupled with considerable time spent in the culturally rich country of Italy, as well as growing up in the artistically stimulating environment her parents created, set the young girl apart from the masses and helped form a truly unique world. personality – a personality unbrainwashed by America’s pervasive pop culture, beaming relentlessly on TVs nationwide.

Untitled, Providence, Rhode Island, 1975-1978, vintage silver print. Image: 3 7/8 x 3 7/8 in. (9.8 x 9.7cm). Courtesy of Woodman Family Foundation and Marian Goodman Gallery © Woodman Family Foundation / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York, 2021

Francesca made her first self-portrait at the age of thirteen. Her father had given her a camera shortly before she went to boarding school at the historic Abbot Academy in Andover, Massachusetts, and found himself greatly impressed by the fervor with which his daughter turned. towards the medium. She was completely natural. In 1975, after graduating from high school in Boulder, Colorado, Francesca attended Rhode Island School of Design in Providence, where she again studied with photographer Wendy Snyder MacNeil, with whom she first studied at the Abbot Academy.

Of particular interest is the size in which Woodman chose to print his work. Often his prints are not much larger than the original negatives. This automatically forces the viewer into a more intimate experience. It also leaves a semblance of mystery. There are no unknowns in a print that has been enlarged to a much larger size. Everything is staring you straight in the eye. And it was all part of Francesca’s method, her very complex vision. Because with Francesca Woodman, nothing is accidental. She knew exactly what she was doing. A well-educated and extremely eloquent scholar, she kept detailed journals for most of her life, in which she recorded much of her thought processes and feelings, as well as what she was trying to achieve with her work. . But when it came to the actual execution of the shots, when Francesca was behind the camera herself, she let intuition take over.

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FREE Workshop ‘Dealing with a Money Crisis’, March 22 – Royal Examiner https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/free-workshop-dealing-with-a-money-crisis-march-22-royal-examiner/ Thu, 03 Mar 2022 17:02:49 +0000 https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/free-workshop-dealing-with-a-money-crisis-march-22-royal-examiner/ The Shenandoah Apple Blossom Festival® has a knack for recognizing and showcasing emerging country music talent and the Malloy Toyota Country Music Party, presented by the Q102 lineup, will once again delight fans. Over the years, the Festival has welcomed artists like Blake Shelton and Billy Currington in 2004, Parmalee in 2018, Jimmie Allen in […]]]>

The Shenandoah Apple Blossom Festival® has a knack for recognizing and showcasing emerging country music talent and the Malloy Toyota Country Music Party, presented by the Q102 lineup, will once again delight fans. Over the years, the Festival has welcomed artists like Blake Shelton and Billy Currington in 2004, Parmalee in 2018, Jimmie Allen in 2019 and many more to our stage as they established their name in the music industry. country music. For 2022, we are pleased to announce that Sam Grow will be headlining the show with special guest Ryan Jewel from 8:00 p.m. to midnight on Saturday evening, April 30 at the Tolley Dental Zone at James R. Wilkins, Jr. Athletics & Events Center on the campus of Shenandoah University. Tickets cost $35.00 and are available at www.thebloom.com.

sam grow up

We can all remember moments that changed our lives and hopefully the lives of those we love.

Ask Sam Grow and he’ll tell you he’s had maybe three. The first came in high school, when his father agreed to buy Sam the guitar he desperately wanted – but only on one fateful condition. The next day came the day he held his newborn daughter for the first time, a moment that prompted him to make a special wish that he has kept ever since. And the third involved his decision to pass up several tempting opportunities until the perfect one presented itself – signing with Average Joes Entertainment.

Since signing with the Nashville-based label in 2019, Grow has amassed over 40 million streams across all digital service platforms, been named to Billboard’s coveted “7 Countries to Watch” list, and was recently ranked by Music Row magazine as “On Board for Strong Offers for Future Stardom.” Her 2020 hit single, “Song About You,” from her EP, Me And Mine, was listed as one of Spotify’s “Best Country Songs of 2020-Wrapped,” and her 2019 album, “Love and Whiskey”, debuted at No. 1 on the iTunes Country Albums Chart.

sam grow up

“Love and Whiskey” was a self-portrait that spoke to listeners as if they had written those songs themselves. Add his insight as a singer, his ability to convey loneliness, love and laughter with equal eloquence, and you have an album that represents the best of modern country.

Grow began his journey in Mechanicsville, Maryland, where his father JR worked on power lines by day and loved to sing and listen to music at home at night. Sam started showing signs of talent at an early age – so early that at the age of 5, after his family moved to Winfield, Kansas, he made his debut singing “Amazing Grace” at the local Baptist church. Winfield also hosts the annual Walnut Valley Festival, which features many of the top bluegrass singers and players. This, too, opened Grow’s eyes and ears.

At 10, he started writing songs. By the time his parents divorced, Grow realized that music could be more than a hobby or a distraction. “I saw a lot of things that 12 or 13 year olds shouldn’t see,” he recalls. “I felt I had something to say about those moments. That’s why I started writing about them. Eventually, music became my escape, a way to get away from everything that was bad.

Grow and his father moved back to Maryland, where their close bond grew even stronger. That brings us to that first milestone in Sam’s life. When he begged Dad to buy him a guitar, JR agreed with one stipulation: Sam was to promise to use it to develop his own music – specifically, he wouldn’t use it. wouldn’t use to imitate Green Day and other bands that were on the radio. at this moment.

Sam agreed to these terms. It wasn’t until several years later that he discovered his father had spent $500 on the instrument by maxing out his credit card. Sam learned more from it than music. “That’s why I say dad was my biggest influence,” he explains. “And not just in music. He tried to excel in everything he did. Seeing him always striving to be the best he can be has definitely inspired me to try not to turn anything into something.

And he still owns that guitar.

When he was 15, Sam went with his father to Nashville. JR was there on business, but he found time to introduce his son to Robert’s Western Wear, the classic Music City honky-tonk. Just a year later, Sam was playing gigs and leading his own band. Eventually he enrolled at the College of Southern Maryland as a music major, but quit after a while and returned to making music. He knew then and knows now that he really had no other choice, and it was all because of that second step.

When he first held his infant daughter, he said, “I realized I was his first example of what a man is. I didn’t want to be the kind of man who said, ‘I had a dream of playing music but then I got you and put it away.’ It’s the worst thing you can say to a child. Watching her, I wanted her to grow up knowing that I was chasing my dreams. I wanted her to believe, like me, that the world is limitless.

So Grow has dedicated himself full-time to acting, performing and writing. He recorded an independent album, Ignition, in 2009 and began touring beyond Maryland territory, with shows booked in Los Angeles, San Diego, Vancouver and other faraway destinations. When he landed a gig at the Nashville Underground, he impulsively texted producer Matt McClure, even though they had never met, inviting him to come see a set or two. Impressed, McClure began pitching Grow to major publishers. Offers were offered immediately. Grow moved to Nashville in 2013 and began releasing their own music, starting with a self-titled EP in 2014, followed by The Blame in 2017 and A Little Like Me in 2018.

One last step remained. When Grow was booked to open for Colt Ford, the iconic country rapper invited him on his bus to write a song with him and mutual friend Taylor Phillips. “We wrote a song,” notes Grow. “Then we wrote another song. Then Colt said, “I want more people to hear your music.” Will you please come and sign with Average Joes? “

This leads directly into Love And Whiskey, with Grow’s band providing the music as promised and Jacob Rice producing. Ironically, the first two singles were the only cuts he didn’t co-write. However, “Boots” and “History” seem to have been adapted to its history. The “boots,” in particular, came to him at exactly the right time, just weeks after his father passed away. Josh Thompson’s words hit on something in Grow, whose memories of JR include the favorite pair of boots he wore throughout his life.

“Every time I play ‘Boots’ and get hooked, people who have followed respond and personally because they know how it connects to my feelings about my dad,” Grow insists. “But it also hits home when I sing it for a new audience, like I did recently on the Tyler Farr tour, because it speaks to his audience and to mine: hard-working, blue-collar workers. who wake up every morning, strap them on, put on your boots and get to work.

Ryan Jewel

Ryan Jewel

Like many artists, Ryan Jewel was drawn to music from an early age. When he got his first guitar, there was no looking back. In high school, Ryan started performing with the idea of ​​becoming a professional musician. During his sophomore year at Clemson University, Ryan and his teammate, Andrew Beam, were burning down every bar, club, sorority, and frat party they could throw. They were called Beam & Jewel and played 3 nights a week for the rest of Ryan’s college career.

Hailing from Front Royal, Virginia, the country music singer-songwriter released his debut EP “Up on the Drive” in 2016. This EP helped him gain momentum with his music career in his hometown. , the Shenandoah Valley, and beyond. Alongside his EP, Ryan was a finalist in the 2015 Texaco Country Showdown, a nationwide talent search, which reinforced Ryan’s call for a music career. Ryan has had the privilege of opening for some great country artists such as Marty Stuart and Lauren Alaina. He also shared the stage with fellow Nashville performers and Clemson pals Cody Webb and Doug McCormick.

Ryan’s rich baritone voice, coupled with his authentic songwriting, which reflects his own life experiences, has helped him build a strong fan base who appreciate Ryan’s style of shows and “what you see is what you get”.

When Ryan moved to Nashville in 2017, he got off to a flying start; signing a management deal with Harmony Music Group Mgt just two weeks after moving to town. “If we hadn’t signed him, someone would have jumped on him as soon as he opened his mouth in town and started singing” – (Fred Conley) He started singing demos for many established writers in town and soon after began writing with several of those same writers.

Ryan recently released his second studio EP “Heads, I’m Yours…” on all digital platforms and is currently selling hard copies as well as new merchandise at all of his shows.


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5 Livingston Parish educators experience marine training in a workshop https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/5-livingston-parish-educators-experience-marine-training-in-a-workshop/ Fri, 04 Feb 2022 00:53:04 +0000 https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/5-livingston-parish-educators-experience-marine-training-in-a-workshop/ LIVINGSTON, La. (BRPROUD) – Five educators from Livingston Parish had the unique chance to experience firsthand what it’s like to be a Navy recruit during a Marine Corps Educator Workshop . Literacy and Technology Center Deputy Principal Nikki Lavergne, Walker High School teacher Jessica Wagner and coaches Rob Chapman and Doug Dotson, and Denham Springs […]]]>

LIVINGSTON, La. (BRPROUD) – Five educators from Livingston Parish had the unique chance to experience firsthand what it’s like to be a Navy recruit during a Marine Corps Educator Workshop .

Literacy and Technology Center Deputy Principal Nikki Lavergne, Walker High School teacher Jessica Wagner and coaches Rob Chapman and Doug Dotson, and Denham Springs High School teacher Maria Ryan traveled to Parris Island, Carolina du Sud, for the workshop in mid-January.

“It was an absolutely amazing experience,” Wagner said. “We had the chance to see firsthand what the recruits go through, from getting off the bus to the intervention of the drill instructors at the controls. It was very interesting.”

Staff Sgt. Devin Kennett, Senior Drill Instructor at Marine Corps Recruit Depot (MCRD) Parris Island and Educator Workshop Coach, said the workshop gives educators a better understanding of how the training process works and knowledge of resources. that they can share with the students.

“I have a son in college who expresses an interest in a military career, so I had a very personal interest in finding out more,” Lavergne said. “I will say that I have a lot less apprehension, and I’m impressed with the many opportunities that exist with the Marine Corps.”

“I would definitely tell my students not to dismiss the military as an option. Do your research and find out what’s out there, because there’s a lot to choose from,” she said.

Wagner added: “I wish someone had taken the time to show me all the possibilities that exist for rookies when I was younger. It could have been life changing. »

Educators visited the Crucible, a field training exercise, and sat in on classroom-style sessions where they learned about family preparedness, tuition assistance and more programs offered by the Marine Corps.

“Marine Corps Recruiting Command offers Educator Workshops as an opportunity for teachers, principals, counselors, coaches, and media to experience the basic training process first hand,” Sgt. Danielle Prentice of the 6th Marine Corps District said. “The workshops provide attendees with up-to-date information on Marine Corps training practices, military job skills, service opportunities, the military lifestyle, and educational benefits available to Marines.”

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A professor talks about the COVID-19 outbreak and his inspiration for photography – The Connection https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/a-professor-talks-about-the-covid-19-outbreak-and-his-inspiration-for-photography-the-connection/ Thu, 27 Jan 2022 01:58:45 +0000 https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/a-professor-talks-about-the-covid-19-outbreak-and-his-inspiration-for-photography-the-connection/ Professor Patty Felkner was worried and uncertain about her photography lessons when the COVID-19 outbreak hit.Felkner, who was a professor of photography at Cosumnes River College for 30 years, prides herself on being a happy person in life because she can do what she loves as a profession and is able to share that love. […]]]>

Professor Patty Felkner was worried and uncertain about her photography lessons when the COVID-19 outbreak hit.
Felkner, who was a professor of photography at Cosumnes River College for 30 years, prides herself on being a happy person in life because she can do what she loves as a profession and is able to share that love. with his students.
In March 2020, Felkner and his colleague took their beginner photography classes to San Francisco for a field trip. Weird talk about the bus ride home grew among students about the coronavirus, as they weren’t sure if the outbreak would affect them.
Upon returning home, the CRC announced that they had to close in-person classes as it was unsafe for them to continue due to the coronavirus outbreak. This forced all classes to be taught online overnight.
“He just stopped and it was so immediate,” Felkner said. “I was so worried about my family and my students.”
Felkner’s voice had become a little shaky as he thought back to the start of the closings. “I was terrified,” she said.
“She always saw the good in people,” said photography professor Kathryn Mayo, who has been a colleague of Felkner at CRC for 14 years.
Mayo said she admired Felkner for who she was as a colleague and a person and always had a big smile when talking about her.
“I was able to learn so many things working with her,” Mayo said. “I see her not only as a colleague, but also as a mentor and a friend.”
Mayo said she felt she had the right partner to tackle the challenges they would face in remote learning with Felkner’s experience and vision for how students can learn.
One of the many students Felkner has touched is Neezy Jeffery, who majors in photography and has known Felkner since the spring of 2020.
Jeffery is a former student of Felkner and is now his teaching assistant. She said she chose to be Felkner’s nanny because she had a lot of gratitude and respect for her.
Jeffery got to experience both how Felkner teaches before and during the pandemic.
“She went above and beyond in that moment,” Jeffery said. She also said she thought Felkner was always open to her students and always made sure they were okay and learning to the best of their abilities.
“She doesn’t just treat you like a student, she treats you like a person,” Jeffery said. “She treats you like you’re an artist and that’s something you don’t really get going.”
Felkner said his love for photography started with his father, as he was an amateur photographer with a camera.
“He had a camera and I followed him around and eventually he let me use it and so I got really into photography when I was in high school,” she said. “But it had to do with him and his love for him.”
Felkner said the students are what make CRC special for her.
“We have a lot of diversity both ethnically, culturally, age and disability, CRC seems like such an open place,” Felkner said. “I learned so much from my students.”
She also said that her colleagues are also what makes the school special.
“A lot of people who complain about their jobs complain because they don’t really like the people they work with,” Felkner said. “But for me, I really like the people I work with and so it’s also a lot of fun to be at work.”
Most CRC in-person classes will remain online to begin the spring semester until February 22. Felkner said she understands the decision to push back in-person classes due to the recent spike in COVID cases in the Sacramento area, but looks forward to returning to class with her students in the safest way possible.

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