full time – David Hemmings Bird Photography http://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/ Wed, 16 Mar 2022 18:20:17 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-2021-06-25T155134.587.png full time – David Hemmings Bird Photography http://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/ 32 32 MATC Times award-winning photographer promoted – MATC Times https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/matc-times-award-winning-photographer-promoted-matc-times/ Wed, 16 Mar 2022 16:26:20 +0000 https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/matc-times-award-winning-photographer-promoted-matc-times/ Photo by Trevor Keay/MATC Times A student in the photography program, Céline Cotton is finishing her first year in college as a photo editor for The Times. Cotton was unanimously elected by the Times editorial board to succeed graduate photo editor Andi Clunie. Andre Harris time contributor Victoria Magee Chief Editor Note: Originally printed in […]]]>

Photo by Trevor Keay/MATC Times

A student in the photography program, Céline Cotton is finishing her first year in college as a photo editor for The Times. Cotton was unanimously elected by the Times editorial board to succeed graduate photo editor Andi Clunie.

Andre Harris

time contributor

Victoria Magee

Chief Editor

Note: Originally printed in vol. 61 of the print edition of the MATC Times.

Times editor Victoria Magee has appointed Celine Cotton as the newspaper’s photo editor.

Cotton, a sophomore in photography, joined the paper in the fall 2019 semester. “I originally joined The Times during new student orientation,” she said. “Victoria had mentioned they were looking for photographers, and in my mind I just thought ‘that’s me!’ Because I was homeschooled, I knew when I went to college , I wanted to fully immerse myself in. I had looked to see what clubs and things were on offer to see if I could get to know people, but there was nothing to do with photography or any of my interests. So The Times seemed like a great idea. She added.

During the school year, Cotton contributed to a multitude of photojournalism assignments, including Perspectives, Portraits and Sports. One of those assignments, “The Fiserv Forum Tour Takes Visitors Behind the Scenes,” earned him high accolades in the state. Cotton won honorable mention for photography in the Wisconsin Newspaper Association Foundation’s Better Newspaper competition. A great honor considering she was competing against students from four-year schools including Marquette University and the University of Wisconsin.

“I guess I would say it was unexpected.” Said Cotton. She adds that she remembers being told her photographs were up for a competition, but she didn’t think she would get very far.

“I knew by the time some people get to college, they’ve been practicing what they’re studying,” Cotton added. “I only bought my first camera a few months before the start of the school year, so when I was told that I had won an award for my images, I was really surprised. And to be surprised, I was really excited that someone else saw my pictures and completely enjoyed them. It was a bit of a confidence booster,” Cotton said.

The photography student feels positive about her new position and expects this year to have good results. Cotton also recognizes the unique challenges due to the pandemic, but sees it as an opportunity for growth.

“The last semester has been stressful,” Cotton said. “I know college is hard enough when you’re a full-time student, going to work part-time or full-time, and you’re also in a school organization of some kind. However, add a pandemic into the mix and it makes things much more complicated. The only advantage I think I have here is that I was homeschooled from elementary to high school, I’m used to an online format for school and I’m used to having a certain level of self-study (I 100% prefer in people classes),” she said.

“With the Times, I’m trying to figure out all the photo editor responsibilities. I think I should be able to do it, I just have to get used to it,” she said.

Cotton came to school with a unique background. She was homeschooled from kindergarten to grade 12 and originally wanted to pursue a dance degree at UW-Whitewater. She was also a “dance/choreography” instructor in the Wauwatosa Recreation Department. Cotton is trained in ballet, tap, hip hop and jazz.

Cotton says one of the biggest benefits of homeschooling was her schedule. Stating that she had the opportunity to create her own schedule.

“Creating my own schedule allowed me to do things that people my age (20) usually couldn’t do since they would be in class (like teaching dance lessons in the afternoon)” , she said. Cotton says another positive was being able to learn at your own pace.

“If I needed more time on a topic or concept, I could have it, or if I understood that topic or concept quickly, then I could move on. Some days I finished school as early as 10 a.m., while other days I didn’t finish school until 6 p.m. I preferred 10 a.m.,” she explained.

Cotton says the biggest downside to being homeschooled was socializing. “For some people that aspect isn’t great, but I’m a very social person,” she said.

After graduation, she plans to become a professional photographer. She hopes to travel the world and photograph her adventures, while being paid to do so.

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Broadway Photographer Exhibit on Display at Ole Miss | Mississippi News https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/broadway-photographer-exhibit-on-display-at-ole-miss-mississippi-news/ Sat, 12 Mar 2022 06:01:00 +0000 https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/broadway-photographer-exhibit-on-display-at-ole-miss-mississippi-news/ By BROOKE BULLOCK BURLESON, Daily Journal OXFORD, Mississippi (AP) — When Jenny Anderson graduated from the University of Mississippi more than a decade ago, she had no idea her career path would include photographing Broadway stars and actors and Oscar-nominated actresses. “When I was younger, my dad was an artist and an art teacher. My […]]]>

By BROOKE BULLOCK BURLESON, Daily Journal

OXFORD, Mississippi (AP) — When Jenny Anderson graduated from the University of Mississippi more than a decade ago, she had no idea her career path would include photographing Broadway stars and actors and Oscar-nominated actresses.

“When I was younger, my dad was an artist and an art teacher. My mom was a performer in theater productions,” Anderson said. age.

More than 14 years of Anderson’s work as a Broadway and freelance photographer are on display at the Gertrude C. Ford Center for the Performing Arts at the University of Mississippi.

Titled “The In Between: Intimate & Candid Moments of Broadway’s Stars,” the exhibit includes 45 images, which span Anderson’s legendary career in its entirety. Some stars featured in the gallery are Megan Hilty, Glenn Close, Lin-Manuel Miranda, Vanessa Williams, Tom Hiddleston, and Sierra Boggess.

political cartoons

The exhibition opened on January 28 and will run until at least the end of the spring semester.

Anderson earned her bachelor’s degree in journalism and wrote and produced news for the Daily Mississippian while a student at Ole Miss. After graduating, Anderson moved to New York, where she interned and later worked as a full-time employee for Broadway. com.

Anderson said that although she has been photographing Broadway shows and stars for nearly 15 years, she had not yet seen her work exhibited until it debuted at the Ford Center.

“It pretty much covers the 14 years,” Anderson said of the exhibit.

Anderson is a full-time resident of New York, but she still maintains her Mississippi roots. Her parents live in the Oxford area and she visits them often. She recently came to the University of Mississippi campus to see her artwork unveiled this year.

“My former professor, Ellen Meachum, was my advisor when we did the Daily Mississippian in college,” Anderson said. “She has been part of my career for years and has always supported and advised me.”

About two years ago, Meachum connected Anderson with his sister, Kate Meachum, who oversees marketing at the Ford Center.

“Kate said she would like me to host a show at Ford Center,” Anderson said.

The show was originally slated to debut in 2020, but has been pushed back several times due to the coronavirus pandemic.

Kate Meachum said that as a theater where national tours and Broadway shows take place, it’s special to have photos of shows that will end up filming at Ford Center.

“The connection to Broadway and theater is something that we were interested in,” Meachum said.

Anderson said this show is mostly made up of behind-the-scenes moments at theaters and the Tony Awards.

“It’s the in-between moments before they go on stage or dress up,” she said.

Since Broadway was closed during the COVID-19 pandemic, Anderson has instead filmed for ABC’s morning shows, including LIVE with Kelly and Ryan and The View. She also had the opportunity to cover election night in 2020 and the presidential inauguration in early 2021.

Anderson has also photographed musical sensations like Cyndi Lauper and Demi Lovato and critically acclaimed actors like Amy Adams and Andrew Garfield.

The exhibit is free and open to the public during Ford Center hours.

Copyright 2022 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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FREE Workshop ‘Dealing with a Money Crisis’, March 22 – Royal Examiner https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/free-workshop-dealing-with-a-money-crisis-march-22-royal-examiner/ Thu, 03 Mar 2022 17:02:49 +0000 https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/free-workshop-dealing-with-a-money-crisis-march-22-royal-examiner/ The Shenandoah Apple Blossom Festival® has a knack for recognizing and showcasing emerging country music talent and the Malloy Toyota Country Music Party, presented by the Q102 lineup, will once again delight fans. Over the years, the Festival has welcomed artists like Blake Shelton and Billy Currington in 2004, Parmalee in 2018, Jimmie Allen in […]]]>

The Shenandoah Apple Blossom Festival® has a knack for recognizing and showcasing emerging country music talent and the Malloy Toyota Country Music Party, presented by the Q102 lineup, will once again delight fans. Over the years, the Festival has welcomed artists like Blake Shelton and Billy Currington in 2004, Parmalee in 2018, Jimmie Allen in 2019 and many more to our stage as they established their name in the music industry. country music. For 2022, we are pleased to announce that Sam Grow will be headlining the show with special guest Ryan Jewel from 8:00 p.m. to midnight on Saturday evening, April 30 at the Tolley Dental Zone at James R. Wilkins, Jr. Athletics & Events Center on the campus of Shenandoah University. Tickets cost $35.00 and are available at www.thebloom.com.

sam grow up

We can all remember moments that changed our lives and hopefully the lives of those we love.

Ask Sam Grow and he’ll tell you he’s had maybe three. The first came in high school, when his father agreed to buy Sam the guitar he desperately wanted – but only on one fateful condition. The next day came the day he held his newborn daughter for the first time, a moment that prompted him to make a special wish that he has kept ever since. And the third involved his decision to pass up several tempting opportunities until the perfect one presented itself – signing with Average Joes Entertainment.

Since signing with the Nashville-based label in 2019, Grow has amassed over 40 million streams across all digital service platforms, been named to Billboard’s coveted “7 Countries to Watch” list, and was recently ranked by Music Row magazine as “On Board for Strong Offers for Future Stardom.” Her 2020 hit single, “Song About You,” from her EP, Me And Mine, was listed as one of Spotify’s “Best Country Songs of 2020-Wrapped,” and her 2019 album, “Love and Whiskey”, debuted at No. 1 on the iTunes Country Albums Chart.

sam grow up

“Love and Whiskey” was a self-portrait that spoke to listeners as if they had written those songs themselves. Add his insight as a singer, his ability to convey loneliness, love and laughter with equal eloquence, and you have an album that represents the best of modern country.

Grow began his journey in Mechanicsville, Maryland, where his father JR worked on power lines by day and loved to sing and listen to music at home at night. Sam started showing signs of talent at an early age – so early that at the age of 5, after his family moved to Winfield, Kansas, he made his debut singing “Amazing Grace” at the local Baptist church. Winfield also hosts the annual Walnut Valley Festival, which features many of the top bluegrass singers and players. This, too, opened Grow’s eyes and ears.

At 10, he started writing songs. By the time his parents divorced, Grow realized that music could be more than a hobby or a distraction. “I saw a lot of things that 12 or 13 year olds shouldn’t see,” he recalls. “I felt I had something to say about those moments. That’s why I started writing about them. Eventually, music became my escape, a way to get away from everything that was bad.

Grow and his father moved back to Maryland, where their close bond grew even stronger. That brings us to that first milestone in Sam’s life. When he begged Dad to buy him a guitar, JR agreed with one stipulation: Sam was to promise to use it to develop his own music – specifically, he wouldn’t use it. wouldn’t use to imitate Green Day and other bands that were on the radio. at this moment.

Sam agreed to these terms. It wasn’t until several years later that he discovered his father had spent $500 on the instrument by maxing out his credit card. Sam learned more from it than music. “That’s why I say dad was my biggest influence,” he explains. “And not just in music. He tried to excel in everything he did. Seeing him always striving to be the best he can be has definitely inspired me to try not to turn anything into something.

And he still owns that guitar.

When he was 15, Sam went with his father to Nashville. JR was there on business, but he found time to introduce his son to Robert’s Western Wear, the classic Music City honky-tonk. Just a year later, Sam was playing gigs and leading his own band. Eventually he enrolled at the College of Southern Maryland as a music major, but quit after a while and returned to making music. He knew then and knows now that he really had no other choice, and it was all because of that second step.

When he first held his infant daughter, he said, “I realized I was his first example of what a man is. I didn’t want to be the kind of man who said, ‘I had a dream of playing music but then I got you and put it away.’ It’s the worst thing you can say to a child. Watching her, I wanted her to grow up knowing that I was chasing my dreams. I wanted her to believe, like me, that the world is limitless.

So Grow has dedicated himself full-time to acting, performing and writing. He recorded an independent album, Ignition, in 2009 and began touring beyond Maryland territory, with shows booked in Los Angeles, San Diego, Vancouver and other faraway destinations. When he landed a gig at the Nashville Underground, he impulsively texted producer Matt McClure, even though they had never met, inviting him to come see a set or two. Impressed, McClure began pitching Grow to major publishers. Offers were offered immediately. Grow moved to Nashville in 2013 and began releasing their own music, starting with a self-titled EP in 2014, followed by The Blame in 2017 and A Little Like Me in 2018.

One last step remained. When Grow was booked to open for Colt Ford, the iconic country rapper invited him on his bus to write a song with him and mutual friend Taylor Phillips. “We wrote a song,” notes Grow. “Then we wrote another song. Then Colt said, “I want more people to hear your music.” Will you please come and sign with Average Joes? “

This leads directly into Love And Whiskey, with Grow’s band providing the music as promised and Jacob Rice producing. Ironically, the first two singles were the only cuts he didn’t co-write. However, “Boots” and “History” seem to have been adapted to its history. The “boots,” in particular, came to him at exactly the right time, just weeks after his father passed away. Josh Thompson’s words hit on something in Grow, whose memories of JR include the favorite pair of boots he wore throughout his life.

“Every time I play ‘Boots’ and get hooked, people who have followed respond and personally because they know how it connects to my feelings about my dad,” Grow insists. “But it also hits home when I sing it for a new audience, like I did recently on the Tyler Farr tour, because it speaks to his audience and to mine: hard-working, blue-collar workers. who wake up every morning, strap them on, put on your boots and get to work.

Ryan Jewel

Ryan Jewel

Like many artists, Ryan Jewel was drawn to music from an early age. When he got his first guitar, there was no looking back. In high school, Ryan started performing with the idea of ​​becoming a professional musician. During his sophomore year at Clemson University, Ryan and his teammate, Andrew Beam, were burning down every bar, club, sorority, and frat party they could throw. They were called Beam & Jewel and played 3 nights a week for the rest of Ryan’s college career.

Hailing from Front Royal, Virginia, the country music singer-songwriter released his debut EP “Up on the Drive” in 2016. This EP helped him gain momentum with his music career in his hometown. , the Shenandoah Valley, and beyond. Alongside his EP, Ryan was a finalist in the 2015 Texaco Country Showdown, a nationwide talent search, which reinforced Ryan’s call for a music career. Ryan has had the privilege of opening for some great country artists such as Marty Stuart and Lauren Alaina. He also shared the stage with fellow Nashville performers and Clemson pals Cody Webb and Doug McCormick.

Ryan’s rich baritone voice, coupled with his authentic songwriting, which reflects his own life experiences, has helped him build a strong fan base who appreciate Ryan’s style of shows and “what you see is what you get”.

When Ryan moved to Nashville in 2017, he got off to a flying start; signing a management deal with Harmony Music Group Mgt just two weeks after moving to town. “If we hadn’t signed him, someone would have jumped on him as soon as he opened his mouth in town and started singing” – (Fred Conley) He started singing demos for many established writers in town and soon after began writing with several of those same writers.

Ryan recently released his second studio EP “Heads, I’m Yours…” on all digital platforms and is currently selling hard copies as well as new merchandise at all of his shows.


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In Largest NFT-Backed Loan, 101 CryptoPunks Were Pledged as Collateral https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/in-largest-nft-backed-loan-101-cryptopunks-were-pledged-as-collateral/ Tue, 01 Mar 2022 17:07:00 +0000 https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/in-largest-nft-backed-loan-101-cryptopunks-were-pledged-as-collateral/ The loan was completed by liquidity scaling startup NFT MetaStreet on the NFTfi lending platform “By having an active borrowing and lending market [in NFTs]you create productive assets that are otherwise considered unproductive,” Conor Moore, co-founder of MetaStreet, told Blockworks. In what has been touted as NFT’s largest secured loan, an anonymous borrower has just […]]]>
  • The loan was completed by liquidity scaling startup NFT MetaStreet on the NFTfi lending platform
  • “By having an active borrowing and lending market [in NFTs]you create productive assets that are otherwise considered unproductive,” Conor Moore, co-founder of MetaStreet, told Blockworks.

In what has been touted as NFT’s largest secured loan, an anonymous borrower has just taken out an $8 million loan secured by his collection of 101 CryptoPunks.

The loan has an APR of 10% and a term of 30 days. It was facilitated by the MetaStreet liquidity scaling solution on the NFTfi peer-to-peer lending platform.

The funding is seen by industry players as an indicator of the future of loans secured by digital collectibles – a market that is expected to grow as institutional interest in the sector continues to grow.

Conor Moore, co-founder and COO of MetaStreet, told Blockworks that the loan is “an order of magnitude larger” than previous NFT (non-fungible token) funding. MetaStreet helped secure the previous record-breaking loan last year – a $1.42 million loan secured by an autoglyph.

Moore did not reveal the identity of the borrower, whom he referred to as a “whale,” or someone who holds large amounts of cryptocurrency.

MetaStreet, which has eight full-time employees, secured $3 million in seed funding and $11 million in initial cash from the protocol earlier this year. The company provides a layer of financial infrastructure to NFTs, specifically lending protocols such as NFTfi and Arcade.

“It’s kind of like how Fannie Mae works in the US real estate market. You have a big aggregation vehicle through which originators can sell loans which are then matched and split into different tranches,” Moore said. “These different tranches allow for more optimal capital efficiency.”

NFT collectors MetaStreet co-founder and CEO David Choi said they want to free up capital more efficiently and don’t want their crypto-assets to accumulate “virtual dust”.

“I think [NFT] the borrowing markets will get bigger and bigger, which means its purchasing power will increase,” Choi said. “It’s like instead of putting all your money into buying a house, you get a mortgage, which means you don’t have to pay that 90% until later. [With MetaStreet]I think we are extending the purchasing power of the whole industry.


Get the top crypto news and insights of the day delivered to your inbox each evening. Subscribe to Blockworks’ free newsletter now.


  • Morgan Chittum

    Morgan Chittum is a New York-based journalist covering NFTs, Metaverse, Game-to-Win, and other emerging Web3 technologies for Blockworks. Previously, she was a street reporter, covering crime at the New York Daily News, and a press and journalism officer at the Poynter Institute. Contact Morgan by email at [email protected]

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Photographer captures the night sky to raise awareness of light pollution https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/photographer-captures-the-night-sky-to-raise-awareness-of-light-pollution/ Sun, 20 Feb 2022 06:08:46 +0000 https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/photographer-captures-the-night-sky-to-raise-awareness-of-light-pollution/ Photographer Imma Barrera is on a mission to document and protect America’s dark skies. For the past few years, the New Jersey-based artist has been working toward her goal of capturing images of the Milky Way in various ecosystems across the country while raising awareness of light pollution and its effects. Glacier National Park artist-in-residence […]]]>


Photographer Imma Barrera is on a mission to document and protect America’s dark skies.

For the past few years, the New Jersey-based artist has been working toward her goal of capturing images of the Milky Way in various ecosystems across the country while raising awareness of light pollution and its effects.

Glacier National Park artist-in-residence from July 2021, Barrera has also served as artist-in-residence at Acadia and Capitol Reef National Parks and plans to spend a month in the program at the Grand Canyon this summer.

“I want to cover different types of ecosystems that are very different from each other with my work. I’ve been very lucky to get residencies in parks that are very different from each other,” Barrera said. “I choose the parks for their foreground. Of course, the Milky Way will look the same no matter where I photograph it from, but each park offers a different and unique foreground for my photos.

After publishing “The Stars, the Moon and the Sun (in the NJ/NY area)” in 2019, Barrera began her study of the night sky in the national parks of Joshua Tree National Park before being selected as an artist in residency at Capitol Reef. Utah National Park in 2019.

“Joshua Tree National Park, with its trees and cacti, is very different from Capitol Reef National Park, which covers more rock formations with their strata and geological history,” she said. “Acadia was important to me because it’s on the east coast and I was able to integrate the ocean. Glacier represents the Rocky Mountains with snow, ice and majestic peaks. They are all so different.

With a doctorate in molecular biology, Barrera worked in research before becoming a full-time photographer. Also a graduate of the New York Institute of Photography, Barrera has exhibited her photographs in several galleries around the world and won several awards.

“Photography has always been my passion. It’s a tool that I was able to use to document, there were infected cells before and now it’s the night sky,” she said. “My photography shows the things that are close to my heart. As a biologist, I care about the environment. I care about how pollution, any type of pollution, affects the environment and our planet. With my photography, I thought a good way to document the effects on light pollution was to photograph the night sky.

Barrera plans to publish a new book soon featuring her nighttime photographs of national parks and was recently featured online as part of the Glacier National Park Conservancy’s Glacier Conversations series.

Barrera says she hopes to do another presentation with the group later this year once she’s finished working on the rest of her imagery from her time at the park, including landscapes, wildlife, waterfalls and Moreover.

In the meantime, she will continue to focus on educating the public about light pollution while continuing to capture her iconic images of the night sky.

“I want to raise awareness about light pollution and what we can do to protect our night skies for future generations. I want to teach people how to photograph the night sky, but I also want to educate them about light pollution and what we can do about it,” she said. “It’s the pollution we can actually do something about and it’s easy and cheap.”

To learn more about Imma Barrera and her work, visit her website at www.imma.photo

Journalist Jeremy Weber can be reached at 406-758-4446 or jweber@dailyinterlake.com.

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Michigan Activist Mom Styles and Photographs Children Like Black Heroes https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/michigan-activist-mom-styles-and-photographs-children-like-black-heroes/ Fri, 11 Feb 2022 20:29:43 +0000 https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/michigan-activist-mom-styles-and-photographs-children-like-black-heroes/ LaKeesha Morrison told The Grio exclusively that the response to her ‘Black History is American History’ exhibit “has been nothing but positive.” A Metro Detroit photographer and activist has created a captivating exhibit for Black History Month of children from her community posing as notable figures in African-American history. “It was always Martin Luther King […]]]>

LaKeesha Morrison told The Grio exclusively that the response to her ‘Black History is American History’ exhibit “has been nothing but positive.”

A Metro Detroit photographer and activist has created a captivating exhibit for Black History Month of children from her community posing as notable figures in African-American history.

“It was always Martin Luther King jr. and Rosa Parksit was a bit like that, ” The Keesha Morrison Recount The Detroit Free Press. “We are in 2022 now, where my child should come home and say, ‘Mom, I learned Ruby Bridges,’ or ‘Mom, I learned Jackie Robinson.’ I want them to be thrilled to know about their heritage.

LaKeesha Morrison’s son Cassius, a kindergarten student at Royal Oak Public Schools, poses as boxing champion Muhammad Ali in his ‘Black History is American History’ exhibit. (Photo: Provided by LaKeesha Morrison)

With the help of a friend, Morrison launched a casting call via social media for children in the Royal Oak, Michigan school system to participate. Children and their parents were able to choose who they wanted to portray in the film from a list of scientists, athletes, inventors, writers and activists.

“Having them choose someone and doing a little research on them, I think it opened their eyes to the fact that there’s a bigger world out there,” Morrison said. “A lot of contributions to America came from black women and men, and (kids) could see themselves as something big in this world.”

For his exhibition — titled Black history is American history, which was installed at the Royal Oak City Hall – Morrison filmed the children for four days, with the able help of a costume designer and a hairdresser. The participants were dressed in costumes matching their historical figures and they posed with the appropriate props.

“The kids had a blast, they really loved it and went for it,” says Morrison. “They were so excited to dress up.”

Morrison is the owner of Little Honeybees Photography, a photo studio specializing in beautiful portraits of children.

According to his biography, Morrison “has been photographing in the Detroit metro area since 2013 and loving every moment of it.” She started her career as a loving mother pointing her camera and has since turned her hobby into a full-time job, specializing in natural light photography. She says she is passionate about her work and helping others find joy.

Morrison said leGrio exclusively that the response to his exhibit “has been nothing but positive”. She added that it inspired “the enthusiasm of the children who participated, their parents, their schools and the community”.

Morrison and her friend, fellow activist summer march, orchestrated the event; they met and bonded last year after the 2020 police killing of George Floyd in Minneapolis. The two men then organized demonstrations, a rally for children and a book fair. According to world population review.

The women say they are looking for more support from their community and others in the Detroit metro area.

“I wish more people would say, ‘You’re right, we need to know more about black history,'” Morrison said. “I want other people to step in and say, ‘Thank you for leading, now let me follow you. “”

TheGrio is now on your TV via Apple TV, Amazon Fire, Roku and Android TV. Please also download the Grio mobile apps today!

The post-Michigan activist mom does hair and photographs children as black heroes first appeared on TheGrio.

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5 of the best highlights from inside the photographer’s mind https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/5-of-the-best-highlights-from-inside-the-photographers-mind/ Fri, 11 Feb 2022 05:10:30 +0000 https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/5-of-the-best-highlights-from-inside-the-photographers-mind/ In 2021, The Phoblographer resurrected Inside the Photographer’s Mind. We offer the show as a video and audio podcast, and we aim to bring the best of photography conversations. Another main goal is to have the most diverse group of guests to highlight all voices and perspectives within the photo industry. It was a pleasure […]]]>

In 2021, The Phoblographer resurrected Inside the Photographer’s Mind. We offer the show as a video and audio podcast, and we aim to bring the best of photography conversations. Another main goal is to have the most diverse group of guests to highlight all voices and perspectives within the photo industry. It was a pleasure to put together the first batch of episodes. In this article, we reflect on some of the highlights.

You can check out this article and more with minimal banner ads in our brand new app for iOS, iPadOSand android. And for $24.99/year, you can enjoy a banner-free experience.

Jamie Windsor on In the Mind of the Photographer

Jamie Windsor was the first guest to appear on the revamped version of Inside The Photographer’s Mind. He holds a strong voice in the photo industry and currently has around half a million subscribers on YouTube. But he is far from being a simple influencer. He is a seasoned photographer who can provide informative and balanced information to those willing to listen. If you are “anti-Youtuber”, we suggest you watch this episode. It may just change your mind. (Read the episode here.)

Vanessa Charlot in In the mind of the photographer

Vanessa Charlot is a smart artist who is also an educator and an amazing photographer. She’s the kind of person you could listen to for hours as she grips you with her thoughtful words and views of the world. She has had a remarkable journey in photography and is happy to talk about why she is passionate about the work she does. Also tune in when she tells us what gift her teacher gave her. (Read the episode here.)

Omar Z Robles on Inside The Photographer’s Mind

You have already seen Omar Z Robles in The Phoblographer. He is best known for his superb portraits of dancers. However, he is also an avid street photographer. Robles joined us on Inside the Photographer’s Mind to discuss his NFT Photography collection and the astronomical amount it sold on the Opensea market. This is a great watch for anyone new to NFT and it will definitely educate you. (Read the episode here.)

Cath Simard on Inside the Photographer’s Head

Cath Simard is an adventure junkie! She likes to explore the world and its highlands, often alone. She’s an avowed introvert, and photography seems to be her best friend. Simard came to the show to discuss her incredible portfolio and how she went from new photographer to Sony ambassador in just two years! It’s an inspiring episode and highlights what can happen when you choose to take up photography. Enjoy the show. (Read the episode here.)

Phil Penmen joins us on the show

Phil Penmen is best known for his fine art street photography. Three years ago he decided to pack up his day job and pursue his street work full time. It paid off, as he regularly holds workshops with Leica, sells his prints, and sees his work showcased around the world. But his photographic journey spans more than a decade. Once a paparazzi photographer, Penman talks about the crazy money he could make back in the day! Check out her full story via the video above. (Read the episode here.)

Who do you want to see?

We want to give you a podcast that puts you first. We can do this by hearing who you want to see on Inside the Photographer’s Mind and what conversations you would like to hear. Let us know in the comments below which photographers you think we should interview in future episodes. Thanks for reading.

Main photo by Cath Simard



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GV Resume Workshops Offer Feedback From Industry Professionals – Grand Valley Lanthorn https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/gv-resume-workshops-offer-feedback-from-industry-professionals-grand-valley-lanthorn/ Mon, 07 Feb 2022 13:08:20 +0000 https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/gv-resume-workshops-offer-feedback-from-industry-professionals-grand-valley-lanthorn/ GVL / Meghan Landgren On January 31, students met with local industry professionals to receive feedback on their resume formatting, content, and translation at the Grand Valley State University Career Center Resume Review Workshop. The workshop takes place monthly. Although the companies represented at the workshop vary from month to month, the students were able […]]]>
GVL / Meghan Landgren

On January 31, students met with local industry professionals to receive feedback on their resume formatting, content, and translation at the Grand Valley State University Career Center Resume Review Workshop. The workshop takes place monthly.

Although the companies represented at the workshop vary from month to month, the students were able to meet a wide variety of companies.

Companies in attendance were Consolidated Electrical Distributors, Inc., JR Automation, Northwestern Mutual of West Michigan, Peace Corps, Samaritas, and the YMCA of Grand Rapids.

The students and companies represented were able to benefit from the workshop. The students who participated received constructive feedback on their first impressions from future employers, while the companies who participated reached out to potential future employees.

It also allowed companies to promote their employment and training opportunities to the students with whom they were in contact.

A GVSU career counselor, Kristie Scanlon, said there are many benefits to attending these workshops.

“Part of engaging potential employers on this is to make it less scary (for students),” Scanlon said. “Naturally there’s a kind of anxiety when you go to an interview, and the practice makes everyone feel better and the process less daunting.”

The Career Center organized the event around the students’ busy schedules.

Although the event lasted approximately four hours, it was divided into time slots to accommodate other student responsibilities.

Those who wished to attend could register for as many 10-minute slots with industry representatives as they wished.

Scanlon said the speed at which students received feedback was one of the main benefits of the event.

“Any time you practice interviewing or someone reviews your resume, you get immediate feedback,” Scanlon said. “But I think what students benefit from is the confidence boost and the ability to say, ‘Hey, I just did that practice interview with an employer and they gave me really positive feedback.’ “

The Career Center will host another Resume Review Workshop on February 18 from 12 p.m. to 2 p.m.

At this workshop there will be representatives from DA Blodgett, Deksia, Deloitte, FWF, Herman-Miller, Penske Truck Leasing, Sherwin-Williams and Specialty Tooling Systems.

Some employers will promote full-time jobs and internships within the company.

There will also be a workshop on March 28, from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., for those unable to attend the February event.

As this workshop is being held close to spring graduation, this may be one of the last chances many students have to receive feedback before applying for post-graduate jobs.

In addition to these workshops, the Career Center offers resume, cover letter and personal statement reviews with career counselors by appointment throughout the year.

Career counselors also offer mock interview and application review services for jobs and graduate schools.

Students interested in peer feedback can visit the Career Lab for guidance.

Students can visit the link for more information on Career Center opportunities or resume review workshops.

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Bookface Literary Group to Host Award-Winning Photographer and Cameraman at Upcoming Event https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/bookface-literary-group-to-host-award-winning-photographer-and-cameraman-at-upcoming-event/ Sat, 29 Jan 2022 07:50:00 +0000 https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/bookface-literary-group-to-host-award-winning-photographer-and-cameraman-at-upcoming-event/ BAFTA- and Emmy-winning photographer and cameraman Doug Allan will recount some of his extraordinary adventures on the ice at an enduring book swap brunch in March. The wildlife snapper – who has worked extensively with Sir David Attenborough – will discuss his captivating book Freeze Frame: A Wildlife Cameraman’s Adventures on Ice at the popular […]]]>

BAFTA- and Emmy-winning photographer and cameraman Doug Allan will recount some of his extraordinary adventures on the ice at an enduring book swap brunch in March.

The wildlife snapper – who has worked extensively with Sir David Attenborough – will discuss his captivating book Freeze Frame: A Wildlife Cameraman’s Adventures on Ice at the popular Bookface book swap breakfast at Glasgow’s Glaschu restaurant on March 5.



Doug Allan, BAFTA and Emmy award-winning photographer and cameraman

Bookface events are the brainchild of Coatbridge-raised animator and creative director Heather Suttie.

Coatbridge High alum Heather is an avid reader and created her 2020 Bookface Facebook book group during the pandemic, which has attracted an incredible 1,900 members across Lanarkshire, Glasgow and around the world.



The Lanarkshire Live app is available to download now.

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It features a book-swap event and a monthly get-together with a host of famous authors and guests to discuss their latest books.

At the upcoming event, Fife-born Doug will talk about how he spent seven years in Antarctica as a research diver, scientist and photographer for the British Antarctic Survey, before changing direction to film full-time in 1983.

Since then, he has become a world-renowned and highly respected cameraman, having won eight Emmy Awards, five BAFTAs and twice winning the Wildlife Photographer of the Year underwater category.

Doug will share insight into his experiences filming nature and living in polar areas. He will also tell some of the stories behind his unique collection of photographs featured in his book.

Heather told Lanarkshire Live: “It’s a dream come true for me in 2022.

“I love Doug and his work; he is fascinating and a brilliant speaker.

“This book is just amazing and I can’t wait to hear how he manages to befriend polar bears and penguins .”

Doug’s directing career spans four decades and during that time he has worked for Discovery, National Geographic, BBC, and his camera work has appeared in groundbreaking series such as The Blue Planet, Frozen Planet, Ocean Giants , Expedition Iceberg and Forces of Nature.

Sir David Attenborough said of Doug: “Doug Allan seems to be immune to most of the limitations that govern other humans. Moreover, he is totally fearless in a way that comes not from recklessness but from deep knowledge and experience.”

Doug added: “There are great days when animals behave spectacularly right in front of your lens. And other quieter moments where a deeper understanding is revealed, a new insight into the environment and what is alive there.

“I look forward to talking about these moments of truth and how they are a wildlife cameraman’s greatest privilege.”

Tickets are priced at £30 and are available from Eventbrite at https://bit.ly/3fMFccw

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Maine Voices: We are parents during COVID. We are tired. And we are the lucky ones https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/maine-voices-we-are-parents-during-covid-we-are-tired-and-we-are-the-lucky-ones/ Wed, 19 Jan 2022 09:00:00 +0000 https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/maine-voices-we-are-parents-during-covid-we-are-tired-and-we-are-the-lucky-ones/ The parents are not well. I am writing this on Martin Luther King Jr. Day, working from home full time with my children, ages 2 and 4, climbing over me as daycare is closed for the holidays. Entering calendar year 3 of the pandemic, this configuration is now more the norm than the exception. The […]]]>

The parents are not well.

I am writing this on Martin Luther King Jr. Day, working from home full time with my children, ages 2 and 4, climbing over me as daycare is closed for the holidays. Entering calendar year 3 of the pandemic, this configuration is now more the norm than the exception.

The parents are not well.

I love our daycare. We struck gold finding one as big as ours. But even they are not immune to COVID quarantines and shutdowns. Three times this fall, our children were home for 10 days at a time due to a positive COVID case at daycare. And that only counts COVID closures. It used to be that parents could keep their sick child at home and send the rest to daycare, one sick child now means they all have to quarantine at home. I agree with the public health reasons behind this. I have my COVID vaccine and my boosters and I still mask in public. My wife and I work in healthcare, so you don’t have to convince us to take the right precautions. All I’m saying is that what was already hard work with limited support – being a parent and working full time – is now even harder.

And the parents are not well.

I am 39 years old. The last time inflation was this high was the year I was born. Since the start of the pandemic, our cost of food has tripled – and that includes me growing a lot of our own. We just paid over $900 for oil. Daycare for two children, at a reduced rate for two of them registered, costs $402 per week. The mortgage, the car payments and the crippling financial impact of student loans – I don’t see how any of this is sustainable.

The parents are not well.

Especially those of us who have a chronic illness. I was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes when I was 6 years old in 1988. Insulin, insulin pump supplies, test strips, and medication for the complications that have been with this disease for so long. Add to that a type of autism that was once called Asperger’s, plus parenting during the pandemic and working to keep our children housed and clothed, and our burnout is burnout.

The parents are not well.

And my wife and I are extremely lucky. We have two incomes and good jobs. I might not be able to get food until payday sometimes, but our fridge and cupboards are never empty – they just don’t always have exactly what my kids want right now. We pay our bills, although we sometimes had to take out personal loans to make ends meet. We have a home and a safe place for our children. They are loved and well cared for. Having grandparents from the Great Depression generation, my wife and I know how much worse it could be.

But we are so, so tired. Tired of worrying that our children, who are too young to be vaccinated, are getting the social experiences they need without putting their health at risk. Tired of navigating health insurance for us and our children through a ridiculous system of hoops, when our cousins ​​abroad just go to see a doctor when they need it without fearing it will mean ruin financial. We’re tired of working, parenting, and homeschooling all at the same time, holding a crying baby in a Zoom meeting, while a preschooler yells “I’m peeing! ” in a world of work that still expects parents and all employees to work as if they had no personal life. And my current boss is fantastic about me parenting while working from home. I can’t say that for all the previous bosses. And, hey, at least I don’t have to take a pay cut when I’m home with my kids due to COVID, illness, or vacation. Many do, and I don’t know how they do it.

The parents are not well. And my family is one of the very, very lucky ones.


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