executive director – David Hemmings Bird Photography http://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/ Sun, 27 Feb 2022 17:33:02 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-2021-06-25T155134.587.png executive director – David Hemmings Bird Photography http://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/ 32 32 Legislature seeks to address Washington’s nursing shortage by funding education and training https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/legislature-seeks-to-address-washingtons-nursing-shortage-by-funding-education-and-training/ Sun, 27 Feb 2022 17:33:02 +0000 https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/legislature-seeks-to-address-washingtons-nursing-shortage-by-funding-education-and-training/ Laurel Demkovich and Arielle Dreher/The Spokesman-Review OLYMPIA — The Washington legislature is debating a number of proposals to entice more people to become nurses. Ideas under consideration include helping students pay off student loans and creating nursing programs at universities in eastern and western Washington. “We have put a lot of effort into training and […]]]>

Laurel Demkovich and Arielle Dreher/The Spokesman-Review

OLYMPIA — The Washington legislature is debating a number of proposals to entice more people to become nurses.

Ideas under consideration include helping students pay off student loans and creating nursing programs at universities in eastern and western Washington.

“We have put a lot of effort into training and helping people on the ground,” senior budget writer Sen. Christine Rolfes, D-Bainbridge Island, said of the Senate budget proposal.

The nursing shortage and pipeline problem predates the pandemic in Washington, and in recent years adjusting salaries for community college nursing educators has helped, program officials say. But they argue that more is needed. In 2020, nursing programs in the Inland Northwest weren’t even accepting half of the applicants who applied each cycle, and a recent survey of nursing union members found that 49% were considering leaving. industry over the next few years.

A bill awaiting a vote in a state Senate tax committee would create a loan repayment program for nurse educators. This would allow nurse educators who teach under an approved nursing program to apply for loan repayment grants.

Nurse educators must have a graduate degree in nursing.

Nurse educators who are faculty members of an approved nursing program would be eligible. The bill aims to address a problem found in many four-year nursing programs in the state: Nurses with advanced degrees can make significantly more money in the field than in teaching.

A higher degree, which is necessary for teaching, is also expensive.

Louise Kaplan, an associate professor at the Washington State University College of Nursing and a family nurse practitioner, said graduate school costs are a huge barrier for nurses interested in becoming educators.

“If you have family responsibilities or have to work, how do you balance and pay?” she says. “It’s expensive to get a graduate degree.”

The exact amounts, service required to be eligible, and penalties for those who fail to fulfill their service obligation would be decided by the Washington Student Achievement Council.

Sen. Emily Randall, chair of the Senate Higher Education and Workforce Development Committee, said Thursday that the Legislative Assembly spent a lot of time this session talking about the importance of expanding the nursing workforce.

Ensuring educators are able to repay their student loans is an important part of building the nursing pipeline and ensuring educators stay on the job, Randall said.

Sen. Jeff Holy, R-Spokane, said he hopes the bill will provide adequate resources that will allow nurse educators to “help us prepare for the next generation.”

The bill was passed unanimously by the Higher Education and Workforce Development Committee. He now heads to the Senate Ways and Means Committee.

Susan Stacey, executive director of Providence Health and Services’ Inland Northwest, said the nursing educator bill will help get caregivers the state “desperately needs” into the field.

“These are the types of programs that I think are going to make a difference in increasing the number of nurses,” Stacey said.

The Washington State Hospital Association supports the nurse educator loan forgiveness program, but Senior Director of Government Affairs Ashlen Strong acknowledged there is still much to be done, such as improving recruitment in rural areas and enabling more nursing students to do clinical rotations.

Improving nursing educator salaries is also important, said Darcy Jaffe, the association’s senior vice president for safety and quality.

“The reality is that even with the loan forgiveness for nurse educators, they are still not paid competitively,” Jaffe said.

The Washington State Nurses Association, which represents thousands of nurses statewide, backs the loan repayment bill and calls it “common sense” legislation because of the support it provides for educators. . The union hopes it will attract more nurse educators to the field, according to a statement from the association.

Unions representing nurses and other healthcare workers are also advocating for legislation that would establish patient-to-staff ratios to ensure patient safety and retain staff.

This proposal has divided the hospital association and unions over what they think will be most effective in recruiting and retaining healthcare staff.

State budgets proposed for this session do not include money for bonuses or retention, but instead focus on education and training.

Rolfes said the Senate discussed a bill that would have provided bonuses, but there was “a lot of uncertainty” surrounding the idea.

House Majority Leader Pat Sullivan told reporters that the House budget proposal also focuses more on bringing nurses into the pipeline by funding additional student slots, financial aid and a significant amount of new equipment. He said it was the quickest and easiest way to prepare nurses to enter the workforce.

The Senate proposal provides more than $6 million over the next two years for Eastern Washington University to create a bachelor’s degree in nursing program.

The House proposal does not include funding for the Eastern program, but it has much the same ideas for nurse education as the Senate proposal.

Both the Senate and House have proposed funding to establish a master’s degree in nursing at Western Washington University, as well as funding to increase enrollment in the university’s undergraduate program.

Both proposals also include funding for the Nursing Quality Assurance Commission to hire 10 staff to process nursing claims to shorten turnaround time. Last year’s budget set a seven-day standard for turnaround time, but the commission is currently handing out licenses in 12 days, according to the proposal.

Other proposals include one-time funding for the Office of the Superintendent of Public Instruction and community and technical colleges to purchase or upgrade lab equipment and a proposal to help community colleges increase the number of slots and of graduates in their programs.

Advocates and educators agree that there are several approaches needed to address the state’s nursing shortage, and the attempts in this session are likely just a few.

Kaplan said she doesn’t think this year’s budget will accomplish everything.

“We need to think about how to fund higher education better so that we can have more opportunities for people to graduate,” she said. “I think we need more scholarships and maybe better supplements to get tuition lower.”

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Dry cleaners close as coronavirus pandemic drags on https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/dry-cleaners-close-as-coronavirus-pandemic-drags-on/ Tue, 22 Feb 2022 13:01:02 +0000 https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/dry-cleaners-close-as-coronavirus-pandemic-drags-on/ “All they had left was not enough to give us a big boost,” Gary, 61, said of the extra customers as he swept the tiled floor of his gutted storefront on East Glebe Road last month. “It’s just an example of the state of affairs. When people don’t go to work, they don’t bring clothes.” […]]]>

“All they had left was not enough to give us a big boost,” Gary, 61, said of the extra customers as he swept the tiled floor of his gutted storefront on East Glebe Road last month. “It’s just an example of the state of affairs. When people don’t go to work, they don’t bring clothes.”

Two metal shelves containing washed shirts and pants were still near the window, where a paper sign summed up their fate: “Notice: store closed.”

Nearly two years after the pandemic changed daily life, the divergent economic consequences for small businesses in Northern Virginia and beyond are familiar: There are the moms and pops who made it through and those who couldn’t get out of it. Entrepreneurs who have found a way to pivot — to contactless “ghost kitchens” or online-only yoga — and family outfits are still praying for some sort of return to normalcy.

Auburn Cleaners was firmly in the latter camp until the omicron variant of the coronavirus and its staggering number of cases delayed a return to the office. The blazers and blouses would sit inside the closets for a few more months, and the Whitesides decided that was it: they would leave the storefront where they and a handful of employees had been cleaning, ironing and packing since the couple had bought it in the early 1990s.

It was another dry cleaner lost to the coronavirus – the third casualty in a stretch of about eight blocks and a much bigger omen for an industry that may never recover. Some trade groups expect that, by December, 30% of dry cleaning businesses operating before the pandemic will have closed.

In the DC area and other major metropolitan areas, dry cleaning has long been considered a middle-class vehicle for immigrant families, many of whom were Korean Americans who settled here in the 1970s to 1990s, according to industry experts. There were low barriers to entry and a limited need for language skills, not to mention a community of other store owners who were often willing to help with loans and training.

But even before the pandemic, many of these independent stores were preparing for change: their American-born children were choosing not to take over the family business, opting instead for white-collar fields. Even in Washington, offices were relaxing their standards for business attire and reducing the need for professional cleaning.

“At one point, you had a casual Friday and then moved on to a casual daily,” said Mary Scalco, chief executive of the Drycleaning & Laundry Institute, a business group based in Prince George’s County. “A lot of them have repositioned themselves as convenience stores and embraced a broader range of clothing – it’s your golf shirts, polo shirts, khakis, not just your ties and suits.”

For the Whitesides, however, it was simply a matter of following the multiple generations of customers who passed through the store – everyone from first responders and hotel workers to a US congressman whom Gary declined to name. . (“He’s been in the news a bit and got some criticism, and I don’t want people to know he lives in that area,” he said.)

Chong Whitesides, who immigrated to the United States from Korea as a teenager, had grown up working in his family’s dry cleaning shops and stayed in the business while Gary worked in telecommunications at a base in the US Army in Maryland.

After moving to Northern Virginia in the early 1990s, she decided to start her own business. The couple bought the Auburn Cleaners store on East Glebe, a neighborhood mainstay on a block full of longtime establishments.

It quickly became a family affair: their son Jeremy, now a computer programmer, worked his way up to George Mason University. When Gary was laid off from his IT job during the Great Recession, he joined her – a ploy to get them to spend more time together.

But the work weeks were 70 hours. With the exception of Sundays and a few holidays, one of them was almost always at the store – labeling the clothes, checking for stains, pre-cleaning, staining and ironing, then sorting and packing.

There would be seasonal rhythms: spring meant ball gowns and wedding dresses; fall was for coats and sweaters. But “other than very general seasonal things,” he said, “it’s a month-to-month crapshoot.”

The number of dry cleaners remained relatively stable in Alexandria during the first half of the pandemic, according to the city’s economic development data, dropping from 54 in January 2019 to 50 in the same period last year. But trade groups warn the worst is yet to come.

Peter Blake, executive director of the Mid-Atlantic Association of Cleaners, which represents 350 storefronts in the district, Maryland, Virginia and West Virginia, said the number of closed outlets — about 10 to 15% of industry – could double by the end of the year.

He said his group had also encouraged its members to diversify their businesses, tapping into laundry and folding and delivery services that could appeal to customers who had few shirts to iron when they started working from home. .

But as the original coronavirus gave way to the delta variant, which gave way to the omicron, the outlook for the Whitesides was bleak.

They closed their store for a few weeks and then reopened – with slightly limited hours – to serve the regular trickle of first responders and other frontline workers who arrived during the summer of 2020. But business this year- there have never reached more than a quarter of what it was before the pandemic.

“There were all these different edicts — which can stay open and which can close — that were all undetermined for a while,” he said. “At one point it didn’t really matter because no one was coming out anyway.”

Auburn Cleaners received two rounds of loans under the Paycheck Protection Program, which “are enough to keep us going for a while,” Gary said. (Some other companies have relied on a special tax credit that was phased out in a federal infrastructure package last year, though industry groups are pushing for it to be extended through March.)

The Whitesides dipped into their savings. They made calculations. They had customers hooked – and still do, even though they moved some operations completely out of a storefront.

But the rest of their clientele, he fears, will simply never return.

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Ethics watchdog releases report on payday loan industry lobbying https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/ethics-watchdog-releases-report-on-payday-loan-industry-lobbying/ Fri, 21 Jan 2022 07:05:00 +0000 https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/ethics-watchdog-releases-report-on-payday-loan-industry-lobbying/ It’s become a cycle of desperation for low-income residents with bad credit scores: They take out a high-interest installment loan to get by in tough times and soon rack up an unmanageable burden. They pay off old debts with new loans at rates up to 175%. For years, state legislators tried unsuccessfully to introduce legislation […]]]>

It’s become a cycle of desperation for low-income residents with bad credit scores: They take out a high-interest installment loan to get by in tough times and soon rack up an unmanageable burden.

They pay off old debts with new loans at rates up to 175%.

For years, state legislators tried unsuccessfully to introduce legislation capping the interest rate on these loans at 36%. Their efforts have repeatedly failed. Last year, an attempt to forge a compromise — with a 99% cap on smaller loans, up to $1,100, and 36% on larger amounts — stalled in the House of Representatives.

Non-profit organization New Mexico Ethics Watch released a new report this week on a study exploring the possible effects of industry lobbying efforts — both money and messages — to ensure that the ceiling not be lowered. What the study found, said Kathleen Sabo, executive director of Ethics Watch, is that lobbyists’ arguments against lowering the interest rate cap were even “more effective” than donations from campaign when it comes to influencing legislators.

“This is an issue that has plagued vulnerable New Mexicans for some time,” Sabo said.

The report says so-called storefront lenders have contributed at least $450,000 to New Mexico lawmakers’ election campaigns since 2005. But the study did not find “significant amounts of campaign contributions to lawmakers in small loan companies that you find in other industries”.

Industry campaign contributions to 58 state lawmakers in the 2020 election cycle totaled $140,000, with most going to Democrats.

Rep. Patti Lundstrom, D-Gallup, and former state senator Clemente Sanchez, a Democrat from Grants, received the highest industry contributions, $7,500 each, according to the report.

It lists several high-profile lobbyists who represent storefront loan companies, including attorney Daniel Najjar, former state Rep. Raymond Sanchez and Vanessa Alarid, the wife of state Rep. Moe Maestas, a Democrat from Albuquerque.

Efforts to reach Najjar, Sanchez and Alarid for comment were unsuccessful.

A key argument against capping interest rates on storefront loans, Sabo said, is that people who depend on small lenders would be left “in a mess, with no money” if high-interest loans n were not available.

The report disputes this. In states where such businesses have closed – potentially due to interest rate caps – “people will go back to making money the traditional way: working overtime, selling assets, borrowing from friends and family,” the report said. And the number of people turning to high-interest online lending companies instead “has only increased gradually.”

Ethics Watch encountered a challenge determining the amount of campaign donations to lawmakers from lobbyists for storefront lenders, the report said.

The state’s guidelines for lobbyists’ disclosure reports allow them to list contributions on behalf of multiple clients or under their own or company name. Some donations from established lenders may therefore not be clear.

The Ethics Watch report comes as Democratic lawmakers in the House and Senate reintroduce legislation to cap interest rates for small lenders at 36%.

Rep. Patricia Roybal-Caballero of Albuquerque introduced House Bill 78, while Sens. Bill Soules of Las Cruces and Katy Duhigg of Albuquerque filed similar legislation Thursday that has yet to be given a number.

Soules and Duhigg introduced similar legislation in 2021. Although the Senate approved the bill, Lundstrom sponsored a House amendment to set the interest rate cap at 99% for loans of $1,100 or less and 36% for loans between $1,100 and $10,000.

The bill died as time ran out during the session.

Roybal-Caballero did not respond to requests for comment Thursday.

Duhigg wrote in an email Thursday that the bill she and Soules introduced is the same one they sponsored last year.

“We have tried many times before and it is important that we keep trying until the practice of predatory lending in New Mexico is gone for good,” she wrote.

Sabo said she plans to contact the governor’s office on Friday to ask for his support in getting the bill heard this year.

Nora Meyers Sackett, the governor’s spokeswoman, wrote in an email Thursday, “We strongly agree that this is an important issue that needs to be addressed, as evidenced by the attention the governor to the question during the last 60-day session.

But, added Sackett, “with such a heavy agenda to deal with in just 30 days…we are not prepared to compromise the importance of the issue by adding it to the agenda without a consensus of good faith among stakeholders that will result in substantive action and protections for New Mexicans.If these sponsors have identified such a consensus, we would be happy to hear about it and assess the situation from there.

Soules said he and Duhigg were talking with House leaders to see if they could reach an agreement on the 36% rate cap. So far, he said, “there is no kind of commitment” on the deal, but he intends to keep working on it.

Many local lenders are affiliated with national corporations, and much of the money they raise comes out of state.

“And it’s low-income people, especially those unsophisticated in the world of finance, who are targeted by the small-loan industry with promises of ‘no credit checks’ and ‘cash within “30 minutes”, Ethics Watch report said.

“Native Americans in particular are targeted by these businesses,” the report said, adding that in Gallup, a town of about 22,000 people considered the commercial center of the Navajo Nation, there are 40 small loan offices.

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SLO Photographer Nic Stover Hosts One Day Workshop at Solvang | Arts | San Luis Obispo https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/slo-photographer-nic-stover-hosts-one-day-workshop-at-solvang-arts-san-luis-obispo/ Thu, 06 Jan 2022 12:03:30 +0000 https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/slo-photographer-nic-stover-hosts-one-day-workshop-at-solvang-arts-san-luis-obispo/ San Luis Obispo-based photographer Nic Stover will lead a photography workshop at the Wildling Museum of Art and Nature in Solvang on January 30 from 2:00 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. The course is described as being designed for photographers of all skill levels. seeking to improve their editing skills. “During this session, course participants will […]]]>


San Luis Obispo-based photographer Nic Stover will lead a photography workshop at the Wildling Museum of Art and Nature in Solvang on January 30 from 2:00 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. The course is described as being designed for photographers of all skill levels. seeking to improve their editing skills.

“During this session, course participants will see how the most impactful and compelling images are those that have the right balance of technique, vision and processing,” Stover said in a press release. “All of these skills need to be continuously developed and refined through our own artistic and creative processes.”

The first half of the workshop will cover the concepts of photographic composition and image design, while the second half will consist of a practical exam and a discussion session. Admission to the class is $ 75. Participants should plan to bring two or three of their own photos (printed or digitally submitted in advance) for the review segment of the course.

Stacey Otte-Demangate, executive director of the Wildling Museum, said she hoped the museum’s current photo exhibit, Sharing the Light, “would inspire visitors to dive into their own photography,” and that attendees of the next workshop should expect to hear “great advice on how to take their jobs to the next level.”

Early registration is encouraged as the workshop is limited to 12 participants. Masks are mandatory inside the Wildling Museum. For more information, call (805) 686-8315 or visit wildlingmuseum.org. The museum is located at 1511 Mission Drive, Unit B, Solvang.

To learn more about Stover and his photography portfolio, visit stoverphoto.com. ??


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The best photos captured by VOSD photographers in 2021 – Voice of San Diego https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/the-best-photos-captured-by-vosd-photographers-in-2021-voice-of-san-diego/ Fri, 31 Dec 2021 23:52:42 +0000 https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/the-best-photos-captured-by-vosd-photographers-in-2021-voice-of-san-diego/ Southeastern San Diego, November 4, 2021. / Photo by Adriana Heldiz Voice of San Diego is known for its groundbreaking investigations that hold leaders and local agencies to account. Our journalists have spent countless hours analyzing complex issues to educate our readers on how specific policies and decisions affect them. It is not an easy […]]]>


Southeastern San Diego, November 4, 2021. / Photo by Adriana Heldiz

Voice of San Diego is known for its groundbreaking investigations that hold leaders and local agencies to account. Our journalists have spent countless hours analyzing complex issues to educate our readers on how specific policies and decisions affect them.

It is not an easy task and sometimes it takes more than just a written assignment. This is where the photos come in.

In 2021, VOSD photojournalists were in the field documenting events and moments that showed how these complex issues affect the people of San Diego.

Here is some of our best work.

Trump supporters in San Diego

The same day hundreds stormed to the United States Capitol in Washington, DC, local Trump supporters protested the 2020 presidential election results at the San Diego County administrative center in downtown. Photo by Adriana Heldiz

San Diego Homeless Vaccine

As San Diego County began receiving shipments of COVID-19 vaccine, health workers and vulnerable residents were placed on the front lines to receive their vaccines. Homeless residents staying in the temporary shelter at the convention center, like Rude Rowe pictured above, have received their first vaccines February. 3. Photo by Adriana Heldiz

Homeless Accident in San Diego

In March, VOSD’s Lisa Halverstadt verified Mayor Todd Gloria’s plan to deal with the growing homeless tent camps in downtown San Diego.

Then a a horrible accident happened on March 15, when a driver entered a homeless camp located under a bridge next to San Diego City College, killing three people and injuring six others. The tragedy put the problem in perspective. Photo by Adriana Heldiz

San Diego Unified COVID

San Diego Unified School District reopened classrooms to students whose families chose to return to face-to-face instruction om April 12. The image above shows third grade students from Encanto Elementary Schoolis lying a video during the course. Photo by Adriana Heldiz

Tara Buesig, executive director of the San Diego County Harm Reduction Coalition, uses a fentanyl test strip.
Tara Buesig, executive director of the San Diego County Harm Reduction Coalition, uses a fentanyl test strip. / Photo by Megan Wood

Fatal drug overdoses, especially those involving fentanyl, have skyrocketed as the opioids are increasingly pouring into the streets of San Diego and was mixed with other drugs, including methamphetamine. San Diego’s homeless community has been particularly vulnerable.

On May 10, Megan Wood of VOSD followed Tara Buesig, executive director of the Harm Reduction Coalition of San Diego County, as she handed out fentanyl test strips in Point Loma. Photo by Megan Wood

CSU San Marcos

After the discovery of former VOSD journalist Kayla Jiminez sexual bullying allegations vs. CSU San Marcos Professor Chetan Kumar, students protested the university’s decision not to dismiss him to June 12. Photo by Adriana Heldiz

Coronado High School

Following a tortilla-throwing incident during a Coronado High School men’s basketball game in June, former Coronado students have spoken about how they were mistreated by the district.

Imani Ware and Irlanda Goulding, pictured above, were both part of the soccer team while attending Coronado High School and faced or witnessed racial discrimination. Photo by Adriana Heldiz

San Diego Homeless Sweep

San Diego Police Officer Nick Medina issued a warning to a man he said threatened to exercise with a weight while performing a homeless camp sweep along 17th Street on August 18, 2021. Photo by Adriana Heldiz

Lidia Davalos sweeps outside near her home in Colonia Nueva Esperanza de Tijuana on September 15, 2021.

VOSD contributor Carlos A. Moreno took to the neighborhood, a former farming area, to get a better look at Amazon’s controversial new warehouse. The images he made as part of a photo essay are austere. They show off a shiny new building – a monument, if you will, to the New World Economic Order – eclipsing the shacks where residents live nearby. Photo by Carlos A. Moreno

Haitian immigrants in Comar

Mexican authorities are helping Haitian immigrants with the help of a translator at the offices of COMAR, the Mexican refugee agency, to register for refugee status on October 13, 2021.

In October, authorities in Tijuana saw an increase in requests from Haitians. Sandra Dibble, Border Report Writer talked to some of these Haitians and how they assess whether they will stay in Tijuana or try to cross the US border. Photo by Joebeth Terriquez

Kendall's Frost Marsh

Matt Costa, a coastal oceanographer measures and notes the different levels of sediment which he unearthed from the Kendall-Frost Marsh reserve at Mission Beach. The researchers will use the samples to determine how many the carbon is in the swamp. Photo by Adriana Heldiz

FILIPINO COVID SAN DIEGO

Gemma Rama-Banaag, head nurse at Paradise Valley Hospital, holds a photo of her late husband Chester Banaag when he was in dental school. He died of complications from COVID-19 in January. 1, 2021.

Within the framework of our First year: the death toll from COVID-19 series of reports, Maya from VOSD Srikrishnam examined how the pandemic affected the Filipino community. She found Filipinos were the third-largest nationality in terms of pandemic deaths in San Diego in 2020. Photo by Adriana Heldiz


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Pastoralists are encouraged to participate in the priority threat management assessment workshop https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/pastoralists-are-encouraged-to-participate-in-the-priority-threat-management-assessment-workshop/ Mon, 22 Nov 2021 22:30:49 +0000 https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/pastoralists-are-encouraged-to-participate-in-the-priority-threat-management-assessment-workshop/ Written by Tara Garcia The Saskatchewan Stock Growers Foundation recently received $ 3.5 million from the Westin Family Foundation to investigate conservation agreements and help ranchers conserve biodiversity in southwest Saskatchewan as well as maintain their breeding operations. The Saskatchewan Stock Growers Foundation and the Conservation Decisions Lab at the University of British Columbia will […]]]>


Written by Tara Garcia

The Saskatchewan Stock Growers Foundation recently received $ 3.5 million from the Westin Family Foundation to investigate conservation agreements and help ranchers conserve biodiversity in southwest Saskatchewan as well as maintain their breeding operations.

The Saskatchewan Stock Growers Foundation and the Conservation Decisions Lab at the University of British Columbia will host a priority threat management assessment session to inform conservation agreements and easements in southwest Saskatchewan as as a program manager for the Stock Growers Foundation, explains Tom Harrison.

“This is an interactive exercise that asks producers, species experts and natural resource experts to form a group and start talking about different elements of conservation, different needs, then come up with priority areas to work on. , priority places and priority activities to focus on. to.”

Harrison adds that through the workshop itself, they hope to gain engagement from producers as well as species experts, ranchers and agricultural producers to get their opinions on different activities.

Harrison says ranchers are essential to the conservation process.

“The ranching community across Saskatchewan is responsible for the conservation and management of Saskatchewan’s native and naturalized grasslands, and the reason we have this allows wildlife to thrive and give a home. “

The online workshop will take place on Tuesday 23 November from 12:30 p.m. to 3:30 p.m. For more details and information on how to participate, contact Wayne Hellquist, Executive Director of the Saskatchewan Stock Growers Foundation at quest@myaccess.ca

Participants will also receive a Cowtown gift of $ 50 as a thank you note.


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VIA will organize a workshop on “Industrial Opportunities in the Bamboo Sector” on the 19th https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/via-will-organize-a-workshop-on-industrial-opportunities-in-the-bamboo-sector-on-the-19th/ Tue, 16 Nov 2021 05:19:30 +0000 https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/via-will-organize-a-workshop-on-industrial-opportunities-in-the-bamboo-sector-on-the-19th/ Business office: Vidarbha Industries Association (VIA) MSME Forum and Maharashtra Bamboo Development Board (MBDB) jointly organize workshop on “Industrial Opportunities in Bamboo Sector” on November 19, 2021 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. in the VIA auditorium , 1st Floor Udyog Bhavan, Civil Lines, Nagpur. Dr Ram Narayan Pandey, from Assam, is an expert professor […]]]>


Business office:

Vidarbha Industries Association (VIA) MSME Forum and Maharashtra Bamboo Development Board (MBDB) jointly organize workshop on “Industrial Opportunities in Bamboo Sector” on November 19, 2021 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. in the VIA auditorium , 1st Floor Udyog Bhavan, Civil Lines, Nagpur. Dr Ram Narayan Pandey, from Assam, is an expert professor of bamboo cultivation, supply chain management and projects. Sanjay Singh from Jaipur is an expert in the industrialization of bamboo and wood. He will share his views and ideas on how bamboo can be used commercially and industrial opportunities in this sector. Mr. Srinivasa Rao, Additional PCCF and Managing Director of the Maharashtra Bamboo Development Board.

He will share details on government policies and benefits for establishing bamboo-based projects. Industrialists and budding entrepreneurs are cordially invited to join the session, says the press note released by Girish Deodhar, President of the MSME Forum. For more details and registration, those interested can contact VIA (Tel: 0712-2561211) or Girish Deodhar, President of the VIA MPME Forum (Mobile: 9822228474) or Amogh Tijare, Executive Director VIA (Mobile: 9561061991). Vidarbha Industries Association organizes from time to time various programs, workshops and seminars for the benefit of its members and the general public. He also discusses issues related to industries with various government departments.


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Photographer Laura Hatcher recognized as Alexandria Veteran of the Year https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/photographer-laura-hatcher-recognized-as-alexandria-veteran-of-the-year/ Tue, 09 Nov 2021 05:03:28 +0000 https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/photographer-laura-hatcher-recognized-as-alexandria-veteran-of-the-year/ Alexandria SBDC Executive Director Bill Reagan and Virginia SBDC Associate State Director Susan Lee Merrow presented Hatcher with a certificate on November 4. (Courtesy photo) ALEXANDRIA, VA – Photographer Laura Hatcher is the 2021 Veteran of the Year, an honor bestowed last week by the Alexandria Small Business Development Center. At the same time, Hatcher […]]]>


Alexandria SBDC Executive Director Bill Reagan and Virginia SBDC Associate State Director Susan Lee Merrow presented Hatcher with a certificate on November 4. (Courtesy photo)

ALEXANDRIA, VA – Photographer Laura Hatcher is the 2021 Veteran of the Year, an honor bestowed last week by the Alexandria Small Business Development Center.

At the same time, Hatcher was recognized as a finalist for the Statewide Virginia Small Business Veteran of the Year award. The State Award recognizes veteran business owners who have made a significant difference in their communities by promoting a sense of duty, volunteerism and an appreciation for country, democracy and freedom.

Hatcher has photographed many local and regional events and specializes in professional portraits taken at his Lee Street studio in the Old Town. Her many volunteer activities include mentoring veterans and spouses on the transition from military to civilian life and employment and on starting small businesses. She has donated over 100 professional portraits to veterans entering the civilian workforce.

Hatcher, a Navy veteran, started his SWaM certified business in the city of Alexandria four years ago. (The Small Business Owned by Women and Minorities (SWaM) Certification Program is a state program of the Commonwealth of Virginia. The goal is to improve procurement opportunities for SWaM businesses participating in funded projects. by the state.)

Hatcher also won the 2021 Trailblazer Award from the Women Program Office of the Virginia Department of Veteran Affairs, which recognizes creativity, vision, courage, commitment and tenacity in advocating for and creating change to improve the quality of life of female veterans of Virginia.

ALSO TREND: New smartphone app will tell the stories of WWII soldiers at Arlington Cemetery


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Artist Jun Kaneko honored in Omaha exhibition https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/artist-jun-kaneko-honored-in-omaha-exhibition/ Thu, 04 Nov 2021 23:31:00 +0000 https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/artist-jun-kaneko-honored-in-omaha-exhibition/ OMAHA, Neb. (KMTV) – An exhibition at KANEKO celebrates their founder, Jun Kaneko, who recently received the Lifetime Achievement Award from the International Sculpture Center. The exhibition, titled FORM, features part of the 79-year-old artist’s permanent collection, which ranges from sculptures to paintings. Jun Kaneko is known for his massive works of art and is […]]]>


OMAHA, Neb. (KMTV) – An exhibition at KANEKO celebrates their founder, Jun Kaneko, who recently received the Lifetime Achievement Award from the International Sculpture Center.

The exhibition, titled FORM, features part of the 79-year-old artist’s permanent collection, which ranges from sculptures to paintings.

Jun Kaneko is known for his massive works of art and is the world’s greatest ceramic artist.

This exhibition is the first time that some of his older pieces have been on display in decades.

“These six ceramic pieces, plus bronze, paint, drawings and a steel and ceramic piece he made have not been exhibited since 1974, when he completed his graduate studies. And so these are six truly amazing examples and some of the greatest examples of his artwork that you can even see, and they are all put together in one space, ”said Stephan Grot, Executive Director of KANEKO.

The gallery plans to launch a fundraising campaign early next year to build a building that would house hundreds of Jun Kaneko’s pieces.

They hope to innovate on this project by summer 2022.

Visit the KANEKO website for more information.

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Zionsville artist helps others cope with grief with portraiture • Current Publishing https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/zionsville-artist-helps-others-cope-with-grief-with-portraiture-current-publishing/ Tue, 02 Nov 2021 10:00:56 +0000 https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/zionsville-artist-helps-others-cope-with-grief-with-portraiture-current-publishing/ After the sudden death of her 54-year-old husband in 2012, Zionsville resident D. Anne Jones founded a non-profit organization to help those who have lost loved ones unexpectedly, and in the process, she found a way to deal with her own grief. Jones, 61, is the founder, executive director and principal artist of Face to […]]]>


After the sudden death of her 54-year-old husband in 2012, Zionsville resident D. Anne Jones founded a non-profit organization to help those who have lost loved ones unexpectedly, and in the process, she found a way to deal with her own grief.

Jones, 61, is the founder, executive director and principal artist of Face to Face Fine Art, a Zionsville-based nonprofit that provides free hand-painted portraits for families or individuals who have lost a loved one. dear as a result of sudden, unexpected or tragic death. . Jones created the organization to help others in their grieving process and to commemorate the deceased by creating “a lasting memory of their life.”

In 2012, Jones lost a sister to a brain tumor. Her mother, a 22-year pancreatic cancer survivor, died seven weeks later. And during her mother’s funeral on Mother’s Day before, another tragedy struck.

“We said, ‘Next Saturday is going to be a fun time, it’s my son’s wedding.’ And that morning my husband didn’t wake up. We had a wedding, but it was so surreal, ”Jones said.

D. Anne Jones holds a portrait of her late husband, Christopher. (Photo courtesy of D. Anne Jones)

Jones’ husband Christopher died at the age of 54, when Jones was 51. But before her death, Jones had already thought about forming the association, and her death reaffirmed her belief that it was something she had to pursue. Face to Face was created in 2013, and over 200 portraits have been produced for those selected by the group’s board of directors.

Initially, the portraits are mainly done in pastel, a kind of chalk. Jones has produced portraits for individuals and families across the United States. She also presented 18 portraits to individuals and families in Jerusalem during a pilgrimage in 2016.

“We put them under glass, and when we took them to the Holy Land, we had photographs of the drawings themselves put on a canvas, we rolled up the canvas and brought it in, so I started to do it. Jones said. “Now when I do the designs I take a photo, upload it to the internet and we present it with a framed canvas. It’s much more visible and durable. You don’t have to. worry about spreading it or breaking the glass.

Over the past eight years, Jones has produced portraits of police and firefighters who have died in the line of duty, as well as children and recently deceased, and those who have passed away long ago.

“One lady, her grandson had an aneurysm when she was 5,” Jones said. “She couldn’t stop seeing him in the hospital with all the tubes going in and out. We did a portrait of him and it reassured him. That’s all. We help them through the grieving process, commemorate the life of their loved one, and keep their memory alive for generations to come. “

While Jones has helped others overcome their grief, she has also found solace in her work.

“It’s been really therapeutic for me,” Jones said. “I have been a portrait painter for 49 years, since the age of 12. For 10 years at Crown Point, I have done weekend art shows, craft shows, and shopping malls 46 weeks a year. It helped me become good at portraiture. I was fed up with doing shows and got the idea before someone died, and it was kind of like God or fortune or whatever put me through that so I could identify myself with other people.

In 2019, Jones ‘daughter Leah unexpectedly passed away at age 37, leaving behind one of Jones’ grandchildren. The loss inspired Jones to move from South Bend to Zionsville on February 29, 2020, to raise her 11-year-old grandchild. Weeks after his move, the COVID-19 pandemic began, forcing the two to socially distance themselves from the rest of their family, who live in central Indiana, for several months.

During the pandemic, however, Jones made a full-time commitment to Face to Face and she continues to create portraits out of Zionsville.

“When you feel bad and you’ve done something for someone else, it makes you feel better,” Jones said. “When I first started doing them – and not so much now – I got along fine, I didn’t cry every day because of my husband and my sister, mom. And I would start to cry. I couldn’t understand what was going on, and it was kind of like I felt the pain of the people I work with before doing a portrait. So, I get to know them, and I talk to them and I pray on the portrait, that it be a source of healing and joy in their life (that of their loved ones).

To learn more, visit facetofacefineart.org.

A source of healing

Zionsville resident D. Anne Jones, Founder, Executive Director and Principal Artist of Face to Face Fine Art, has produced hand-painted portraits for families or loved ones. Below, some portraits:

Emma Kraus, a grade eight student at Zionsville West Middle School, passed away suddenly on October 4, 2020. Artist D. Anne Jones presents the portrait to her mother, Alexandra Lopez. (Photos submitted by D. Anne Jones)

A portrait of Ronald Lewis is shown to his wife, Sandy, and his family, including Cindi Walker Kawka and brother, Greg, on July 17, 2020. Lewis died suddenly during the COVID-19 stay-at-home order.

A portrait of Lake County Corrections Officer Britney Meux was presented to her family in May 2014. Meux was jogging with three other Lake County Corrections officers in March 2012 when she was hit and killed by a drunk driver.


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