covid pandemic – David Hemmings Bird Photography http://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/ Sat, 12 Mar 2022 13:30:00 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-2021-06-25T155134.587.png covid pandemic – David Hemmings Bird Photography http://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/ 32 32 Student Loan Cancellation Doesn’t Mean What You Think It Means https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/student-loan-cancellation-doesnt-mean-what-you-think-it-means/ Sat, 12 Mar 2022 13:30:00 +0000 https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/student-loan-cancellation-doesnt-mean-what-you-think-it-means/ President Joe Biden (Photo by Jim WATSON/AFP) (Photo by JIM WATSON/AFP via Getty Images) AFP via Getty Images Canceling a student loan doesn’t mean what you think it means. Here’s what you need to know. Student loans Will President Joe Biden Forgive Your Student Loans? White House Chief of Staff Ron Klain said Biden could […]]]>

Canceling a student loan doesn’t mean what you think it means.

Here’s what you need to know.

Student loans

Will President Joe Biden Forgive Your Student Loans? White House Chief of Staff Ron Klain said Biden could make a decision on whether to cancel the student loan before student loan payments restart on May 1, 2022, or Biden could extend the student loan payment pause. student loan. It’s possible that this year Biden could both cancel student loans and extend the student loan payment break. It would be a double win for student borrowers seeking major student loan relief in the wake of the Covid-19 pandemic.

However, canceling a student loan may not mean what you think it means. (6 major changes to student loan relief). For example, there is no universal definition for “cancellation of a student loan”. This can confuse student borrowers, especially if you expect your student loans to be forgiven. Here’s how it could impact your student loans.

(Biden to Forgive $6.2 Billion in Student Loans)

1. Private student loans will not be canceled

Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-VT) has offered to forgive all of the $1.7 trillion student loan debt. This includes all private and federal student loans. However, if there is large-scale student loan forgiveness, it would only be for federal student loans that belong to the US Department of Education. Private student loans are owned by financial institutions such as banks as well as investors. Since these companies make money from interest payments, they do not plan to cancel your private student loans. Nor can the federal government force these institutions to cancel their student loan debt. Therefore, if you have private student loan debt, do not expect student loan forgiveness.

(Student loan cancellation reduced to $25,000 for student loan borrowers with a new application)


2. Only federal student loans held by the government would be canceled

When it comes to canceling a student loan, it’s important to read the fine print. This includes the types of federal student loans that would be forgiven. Only federal student loans held by the federal government would likely be forgiven. For example, this includes direct loans. However, FFELP loans are mainly held by financial institutions and third-party investors. FFELP loans are guaranteed by the federal government, but were issued by banks prior to 2010. Since the federal government generally does not own these student loans, they are unlikely to be forgiven. Similarly, Perkins loans are issued by colleges and universities. They too will not be eligible for federal student loan forgiveness.

(3 ways to get student loan forgiveness now)


3. Student loan cancellation will not be available to everyone

Even if you have government-held federal student loans, over 40 million student borrowers are unlikely to qualify for student loan forgiveness. Expect there to be limits on who is eligible. For example, the most likely limitation is income. Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-MA) and Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer (D-NY) have proposed that federal student loan forgiveness be limited to student borrowers earning up to $125,000. It is possible that Congress or the President will set an even lower income threshold. For example, the Covid-19 pandemic stimulus checks had an income threshold of $75,000. It is also possible that student loan forgiveness will be targeted at student borrowers who are in default or in default.

(What to do if you don’t qualify for student loan forgiveness)


4. Student Loan Forgiveness Isn’t Free

Canceling student loans would be a big win for student borrowers. With zero student debt, student borrowers could save for retirement, build their financial future, and buy a home. However, this does not mean that student loan cancellation is free. Although student borrowers would benefit, there are still substantial costs to the federal government. If there is $50,000 in student loan forgiveness for borrowers, the cost could be $1 trillion. If there is $10,000 in student loan forgiveness, the cost could be less than $400 million. In either case, the federal government would absorb these losses. Why? The federal government would not be able to collect principal or interest on these student loans.

(Where Biden stands on student loan relief)


5. Canceling the student loan does not solve the cost of higher education

It’s no secret that the cost of higher education is the underlying issue for many Americans. Student loan forgiveness, if passed, would be a one-time mechanism to erase student loan debt from current student borrowers. If you are a current student borrower, “Student Loan Cancellation Day” would be a day to remember. If you borrow student loans the day after “student loan cancellation day”, that day will also be memorable, but for the wrong reasons. Student borrowers will continue to borrow student loans, but they will not benefit from any future student loan forgiveness. Congress should provide a long-term solution to the cost of higher education that helps current and future generations and their families.

It is important to understand what student loan forgiveness means and if you qualify. Importantly, student loan relief is scheduled to end on May 1, 2022. This means federal student loan payments will resume unless Biden extends the student loan payment pause. It is best to plan for the restart of student loan repayments so that you are fully prepared. This means learning all of your student loan repayment options.

Here are some smart options for paying off student debt:


Student Loans: Related Reading

Biden to Forgive $6.2 Billion in Student Loans

Biden could extend student loan payment break again

6 Major Changes to Student Loan Forgiveness

Student loan refinance rates have gotten ridiculously low

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Broadway Photographer Exhibit on Display at Ole Miss | Mississippi News https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/broadway-photographer-exhibit-on-display-at-ole-miss-mississippi-news/ Sat, 12 Mar 2022 06:01:00 +0000 https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/broadway-photographer-exhibit-on-display-at-ole-miss-mississippi-news/ By BROOKE BULLOCK BURLESON, Daily Journal OXFORD, Mississippi (AP) — When Jenny Anderson graduated from the University of Mississippi more than a decade ago, she had no idea her career path would include photographing Broadway stars and actors and Oscar-nominated actresses. “When I was younger, my dad was an artist and an art teacher. My […]]]>

By BROOKE BULLOCK BURLESON, Daily Journal

OXFORD, Mississippi (AP) — When Jenny Anderson graduated from the University of Mississippi more than a decade ago, she had no idea her career path would include photographing Broadway stars and actors and Oscar-nominated actresses.

“When I was younger, my dad was an artist and an art teacher. My mom was a performer in theater productions,” Anderson said. age.

More than 14 years of Anderson’s work as a Broadway and freelance photographer are on display at the Gertrude C. Ford Center for the Performing Arts at the University of Mississippi.

Titled “The In Between: Intimate & Candid Moments of Broadway’s Stars,” the exhibit includes 45 images, which span Anderson’s legendary career in its entirety. Some stars featured in the gallery are Megan Hilty, Glenn Close, Lin-Manuel Miranda, Vanessa Williams, Tom Hiddleston, and Sierra Boggess.

political cartoons

The exhibition opened on January 28 and will run until at least the end of the spring semester.

Anderson earned her bachelor’s degree in journalism and wrote and produced news for the Daily Mississippian while a student at Ole Miss. After graduating, Anderson moved to New York, where she interned and later worked as a full-time employee for Broadway. com.

Anderson said that although she has been photographing Broadway shows and stars for nearly 15 years, she had not yet seen her work exhibited until it debuted at the Ford Center.

“It pretty much covers the 14 years,” Anderson said of the exhibit.

Anderson is a full-time resident of New York, but she still maintains her Mississippi roots. Her parents live in the Oxford area and she visits them often. She recently came to the University of Mississippi campus to see her artwork unveiled this year.

“My former professor, Ellen Meachum, was my advisor when we did the Daily Mississippian in college,” Anderson said. “She has been part of my career for years and has always supported and advised me.”

About two years ago, Meachum connected Anderson with his sister, Kate Meachum, who oversees marketing at the Ford Center.

“Kate said she would like me to host a show at Ford Center,” Anderson said.

The show was originally slated to debut in 2020, but has been pushed back several times due to the coronavirus pandemic.

Kate Meachum said that as a theater where national tours and Broadway shows take place, it’s special to have photos of shows that will end up filming at Ford Center.

“The connection to Broadway and theater is something that we were interested in,” Meachum said.

Anderson said this show is mostly made up of behind-the-scenes moments at theaters and the Tony Awards.

“It’s the in-between moments before they go on stage or dress up,” she said.

Since Broadway was closed during the COVID-19 pandemic, Anderson has instead filmed for ABC’s morning shows, including LIVE with Kelly and Ryan and The View. She also had the opportunity to cover election night in 2020 and the presidential inauguration in early 2021.

Anderson has also photographed musical sensations like Cyndi Lauper and Demi Lovato and critically acclaimed actors like Amy Adams and Andrew Garfield.

The exhibit is free and open to the public during Ford Center hours.

Copyright 2022 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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The photographer plays an important role in high school diplomas https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/the-photographer-plays-an-important-role-in-high-school-diplomas/ Sat, 05 Mar 2022 16:02:25 +0000 https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/the-photographer-plays-an-important-role-in-high-school-diplomas/ Victor Moreno speaks to a subject during a recent photo shoot. [Justin Griffin] Victor Moreno has shot dozens of covers for InMaricopa magazine, but in terms of volume, magazine photos represent only a small percentage of his work. He takes pictures at all kinds of community events. Sometimes the City hires him for events; other […]]]>
Victor Moreno speaks to a subject during a recent photo shoot. [Justin Griffin]

Victor Moreno has shot dozens of covers for InMaricopa magazine, but in terms of volume, magazine photos represent only a small percentage of his work.

He takes pictures at all kinds of community events. Sometimes the City hires him for events; other times he captures events in his spare time. When people see Victor coming with a camera, they know it’s time to smile. He shares photos on his Facebook page.

But at the start of 2020, when the COVID-19 pandemic hit the Maricopans hardest, there weren’t many people smiling.

The pandemic hit in the spring and some people started losing their jobs. As a result, out-of-work parents suddenly called Victor to cancel or postpone scheduled graduation portraits for their children.

“They were telling me they couldn’t afford it because the husband lost his job and the wife was the only one working, or vice versa,” Victor said.

Graduating from high school is a special time for children around the world. That year was disappointing for many, as the annual debut at Ram Stadium would be canceled, with graduates picking up their degrees in a drive-in ceremony. And then the photos in hats and dresses cherished by parents were in danger for some.

In many ways, the portraits represent the final chapter in the childhood of these children and their parents.

Victor wanted to help. He wanted to make a difference in the lives of these families.

“I felt bad for them,” Victor said.

The inspiration came from Linette Caroselli, a local teacher. She sponsored the first graduate, paying for the photos of a graduate whose family could not afford it in difficult times, and showed Victor how he could advance in a way that helped everyone.

“She called me and said, ‘Can I sponsor a child?’ “recalls Victor. “She told me there was a family she was taking care of that they couldn’t afford to pay, but she wanted to give it to them as a gift.”

A good deed blooms
Hoping to restore some semblance of normalcy for graduates and their families, Victor found a way to involve the community — to ensure more families could get portraits.

First, he cut his photography rates in half, then he asked local businesses to sponsor more children.

And while the program launched two years ago aimed to help families who had gone through a difficult time during the pandemic, it has blossomed into something much bigger.

In 2020, Victor and local businesses put 65 children through his lens who likely would have gone without professional portraits. Last year the number was 98. And this year it will top 100. He still does the work at 50% off, and local businesses and individuals pay the balance. For example, this year Global Water will sponsor five graduates.

But now his efforts go beyond a needs-based program. It became a way for people in the community to do something nice for their neighbors.

Some benefactors sponsor a graduate or two matching interests they had in high school.

“I have a person who wanted to sponsor a student who participated in a group,” Victor said. “I contacted the high school guidance counselor and we found a suitable student.”

Some business owners use the arrangement as an opportunity to thank employees. If they have a worker whose son or daughter is a graduate, they will sponsor the student.

In other cases, portraits are paid for by a family friend of the graduate.

Personalized photo shoots
Although these photoshoots normally last around an hour, there is a lot of work behind the scenes. The effort begins weeks before the first photo is taken.

Victor learns about the students and tries to conceptualize a suitable photo shoot. Then, after identifying a place and a theme, he organizes the time and place of the shoot.

To see Victor work is to see an artist in his element. He takes the time to talk to graduates and build relationships with them. He makes these graduates, and basically everyone who walks in front of his camera, feel like a million bucks. It’s their day in the spotlight.

It is important, he explained.

“I’ll tell them about their college plans or anything they plan to do after graduation. I want them to feel comfortable,” Victor said. “I want them to look relaxed in their photos.”

After the actual shooting, there is work to be done to process the photos. And later he catches up with the parents and delivers the photos.

This year, his annual project started the first week of February. He works long hours to get most of the shots before the graduation ceremony.

Until then, there is no free weekend for Victor.
And he didn’t want it any other way.

This story was first published in the March issue of InMaricopa magazine.

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HAPPY TO EXHIBIT: Artist Clinton’s ‘The Grove’ Pops Up This Summer | Local News https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/happy-to-exhibit-artist-clintons-the-grove-pops-up-this-summer-local-news/ Tue, 01 Mar 2022 01:00:00 +0000 https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/happy-to-exhibit-artist-clintons-the-grove-pops-up-this-summer-local-news/ CLINTON — Local abstract artist Gabi Torres has received a $5,000 grant from the Iowa Department of Cultural Affairs, which she is using to create an outdoor installation called “The Grove.” The grant is part of ongoing efforts to provide relief to Iowa artists and cultural organizations impacted by challenges caused by the COVID pandemic. […]]]>

CLINTON — Local abstract artist Gabi Torres has received a $5,000 grant from the Iowa Department of Cultural Affairs, which she is using to create an outdoor installation called “The Grove.”

The grant is part of ongoing efforts to provide relief to Iowa artists and cultural organizations impacted by challenges caused by the COVID pandemic. Using it to fund “The Grove,” Torres wants to take action to bring about positive change within the community.

When Torres acquired her studio at 83 Main Ave., Clinton, in December 2020, she had wanted it to be more open to the public as a gallery showcasing the work of local artists and a place where she could offer classes. of art. Studio space limitations, however, made it difficult to accommodate social distancing recommendations. Torres was able to secure grants that allowed him to make his art available to the public in other ways.

Torres wants to create more of an arts culture in Clinton and help make it a place that people from other cities will want to visit as an arts destination.

Also, she wants to change the narrative of the city.

“I feel like sometimes people tell each other certain stories about a place where they live, maybe focusing on things that aren’t as positive.” Torres says, “We can start to change the story that we tell ourselves about where we are and where we live, but to help everyone be able to see that, you know, you have to do things to make people realize that this is not the case, or to change their point of view.

To achieve these ambitions, Torres creates his first outdoor installation as a magical forest consisting of 12 paintings of varying sizes, each suspended by eyelets and springs in wooden frames made by Tim Fuller and Charlie Woods of Retired with Wood, and located this summer in Pocket Park in the 100 block of South Fourth Avenue.

The urban aspect of this place contributes to the contrast created by the juxtaposition of something improbable found between two buildings in the city. If consistent with the style that Torres’ other current works have evolved to represent, the pieces included in “The Grove” will be gestural, energetic and lyrical abstract works of art.

Making “The Grove” was not without its challenges. Initially, funding for the project was questioned. The relief grant was originally $10,000. In order to distribute the funds over several projects, this amount has been divided.

“When I saw that, I was like, well, I can’t — I don’t want to do this project for $5,000,” Torres says. “It only really works if it’s at the $10,000 mark.”

The generosity of local businesses and organizations, as well as some very kind people, she said, enabled Torres to make up the amount she wanted to see the project completed to its full potential. Some of those she appreciates for their support, financial or otherwise, include the Iowa Arts Council, Clinton National Bank, Citizens First Bank, Brocolo, Kersh Digital, Clinton Convention and Visitors Bureau, Downtown Clinton Alliance, Josh Eggers of Clinton Parks and Rec, and Brian Lemke, director of public works for Clinton.

Another hurdle early on in creating “The Grove” was what material she was going to paint on.

“The canvas I paint on is not meant to be outdoors – far from it,” she says.

Needing a material that could withstand the outdoor elements, she envisioned a type of canvas used for boat sails. In the end, with the help of Connie Vulich, Torres’ project and event coordinator, and Steve Pearson, owner of Upholstery Unlimited at 1814 N. Second St., Torres settled on the canvas normally used for the soft tops of convertible cars.

“I wouldn’t be able to complete this project without his help,” Torres says of Vulich. “It’s a huge project. It’s a huge undertaking.

So far, Torres and his team of Vulich, Fuller, and Woods have collectively invested hundreds of hours into making “The Grove,” and there’s still a long way to go. At this point, the rest of the frames are being built by Fuller and Woods. Once these are completed, they will measure to find the sizes of the canvases and the quantities of other materials that Torres will need to order before beginning the labor-intensive painting.

Although creating “The Grove” has been a stressful and scary process at times, Torres isn’t going through it alone.

“I have a great team that I work with,” she says. “So one of the reasons why this project is right, for me, as important to me personally as it is, is because of all the different people I work with.”

Learn more about Gabi Torres and her art online at https://gabriella-torres.com.

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Week in Insights: Unlock https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/week-in-insights-unlock/ Sun, 20 Feb 2022 15:02:43 +0000 https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/week-in-insights-unlock/ Earlier this week, I was frustrated because my son forgot to submit his application for the Spanish honor society. He asked me if I was mad at him and I said, “No, just disappointed.” “Mom,” he told me, “We both know it’s worse.” When he brought the form home, we talked about it while he […]]]>

Earlier this week, I was frustrated because my son forgot to submit his application for the Spanish honor society. He asked me if I was mad at him and I said, “No, just disappointed.”

“Mom,” he told me, “We both know it’s worse.”

When he brought the form home, we talked about it while he was filling it out. There were a few attachments, and he had to write some personal statements. He noted that there were two questions on the form that he did not know how to answer, and that he was going to ask about them before submitting it.

Two days later, he still hadn’t returned it.

To be fair, I couldn’t have answered the questions either – who knew, for example, that YOG stood for “graduation year” – but that was the point of asking for help.

We have all been there. It can be difficult when you hit a roadblock to keep going. This is just as true when you are a student as it is in the workplace. I bet we could all easily list two or three tasks, probably customer-related, that we put off because we didn’t know the answer or didn’t know who to ask. And it’s usually not the big stuff – it’s the YOG – the stuff we just need a little help getting over the finish line.

Fortunately, research by Yoshinori Oyama, Emmanuel Manalo, and Yoshihide Nakatani suggests that not completing a task initially can actually increase your motivation to complete it later – a phenomenon the three have called the “Hemingway Effect”. according to the writer. They explained that their reasoning for naming the effect after it is that, when asked in an interview how much to write in a day, Hemingway advised, “The best way is always to stop when you’re fine and when you know what’s going to happen. following. If you do this every day when writing a novel, you will never get stuck.

American writer Ernest Hemingway (1899 -1961) traveling with American soldiers, in his capacity as a war correspondent, en route to Normandy for the D-Day landings.

Photographer: Central Press via Getty Images

Never getting stuck can be a challenge. But sometimes we just need a little help from our friends.

Over the years, I’ve learned a lot about picking up the phone or emailing colleagues in the tax community who can sometimes help me with that one quick response. And I was happy to reciprocate.

I’ve also seen the same things happen on social media. A quick note on #TaxTwitter about the best place to look for updated RRC instructions, a LinkedIn share about the IRS easing K2/K3 reporting requirements, or a wink on Facebook to an explainer on credits foreign tax – these can help you when you’ve hit a wall. It’s one of the things I love about the tax, accounting and legal communities.

This is also true with our Insights. At Bloomberg Tax this week, as always, our experts point you in the right direction with great commentary and insightful analysis on federal, state and international tax matters. And soon, we will extend our coverage to tax matters. It’s all part of our commitment to be a resource for the community and to help keep you from getting stuck.

The exchange. . . This is where great ideas intersect.

—Kelly Phillips Erb

Speed ​​Dial Quiz

How many Hemingway novels have been published posthumously?
Answer below.

Our overview

This week, our experts covered a wide range of topics, from accidental Americans to cryptocurrency. For an overview of what’s making the news, here’s our roundup:

In Intercompany Loan Transactions: Recent Developments in South Korea’s Transfer Pricing Regime, Tom Kwon, Steve Minhoo Kim, and Gijin Hong of Lee & Ko examine a recent amendment to South Korea’s transfer pricing regulatory regime that clarifies and diversifies the method of calculating the arm’s length interest rate for business-to-business loans.

Last year, the US Tax Court upheld the IRS’s denial of a whistleblower request involving a foreign citizen who was apparently born in the United States. In a two-part series, Alan Lederman of Gunster, Yoakley & Stewart, PA reviews a related procedural decision from the United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit:

The growing popularity of cryptocurrencies and other digital assets is expected to continue in 2022. In Cryptocurrencies and other digital assets take center stage in 2022, Anshu Khanna by Nangia Andersen discusses the basics of cryptocurrencies and the challenges that tax authorities face as they try to build a tax and regulatory framework for cryptos.

In a two-part series, the Multistate Tax Commission’s Fort Bruce responds to a recent series of tax briefings on a closely watched case on appeal to the Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court Holdings, noting some basic principles of state taxing authority.

For some background, you can check out the previous series written by Jaye A. Calhoun, Bruce P. Ely, and Kelvin M. Lawrence here:

With so many workers moving away and staying away, their approach to doing their taxes could change. Knowing the ins and outs of the tax code and how it applies to remote workers can be daunting. In How to handle 2021 taxes as a remote worker Cannon Advisors’ Bryan Cannon shares some tips to help remote workers manage 2021 taxes.

In Covid-19 Transfer Pricing Impact in Vietnam—Preparing for Audit, Vishwa Sharan and Nguyen Dinh Du from Grant Thornton Vietnam discuss the transfer pricing challenges faced by multinational companies in Vietnam during the pandemic and how they now need to mitigate risk when preparing for an audit.

A UK tax court recently criticized the UK tax authority for its approach of using expert evidence in a landfill tax case. In the UK tax appeal decision provides important lessons on the use of expert evidence, Lee Ellis of the Stewarts and Colm Kelly of Devereux Chambers discuss what litigants can learn from tax administration mistakes.

Reviews and comments

Container shipping companies have found plenty of ways to spend their huge pandemic-related profits. They raise staff salaries, make acquisitions and return heaps of cash to shareholders. One person who won’t benefit much is you, the taxpayer, writes Chris Bryant in billions of shipping profits are virtually untaxed.

Former president donald trumpThe accountants of Mazars USA LLP have decided to stop. For the former president and his three eldest children, this is an unwanted development that amplifies financial pressures on their business, the Trump Organization. It also raises the stakes in a pair of high-profile fraud investigations into the family, Tim O’Brien written in Trump’s Accountants Quit. What took so long?

Columnists and contributors

With prices soaring, a proposal to grant a federal gasoline tax holiday has shed light on the often-overlooked tax. Here’s a look at the evolution of the unpopular tax.

To listen

The European Union wants to harmonize the way businesses issue value-added electronic invoices across the bloc as part of a wider initiative to make it easier to pay VAT. In the latest episode of Talking Tax, Bloomberg Tax Independent Correspondent Shaun Courtney spoke with Ellen Cortvriend, Director of Indirect Tax Technology at PwC Belgiumwhat countries are doing on the e-invoicing front, what’s in store for the EU and what businesses can expect this year.

On this week’s episode of the Taxgirl podcast, I spoke with Amber Gray-Fenner to talk about the challenges affecting taxpayers and tax professionals this filing season. Amber is a registered agent and owner of Tax Therapy, LLC, in Albuquerque, NM, and prepares tax returns as part of her practice.

The pandemic has brought about many changes over the past few years, impacting tax season in 2022. Bloomberg Opinion columnist Alexis Leondis explains how US tax officials are trying to adapt to the gig economy.

To catch up

It’s been a busy week when it comes to tax news from state capitals to DC. Here are some of the stories you may have missed from our Bloomberg tax news team:

  • Four former bankers at bankrupt Maple Bank GmbH have been warned to expect convictions for their roles in the so-called Cum-Ex deals that stole 388.6 million euros ($441 million) from German taxpayers .
  • A group of House and Senate Democrats are calling on the IRS to expand overtime options for employees and allow workers to volunteer to join surge teams created to help reduce the backlog of the agency.
  • The UK government has published a bill that would increase the powers of the tax office to crack down on promoters of tax avoidance schemes targeting national insurance contributions.
  • New Mexico would allow flow-through entities to avoid the federal SALT cap, reduce the gross state receipts tax rate, and exempt Social Security from income tax under the bills passed by lawmakers in the closing hours of a recent session.
  • Nearly 350,000 loans issued to small businesses in 2020 during the Covid-19 pandemic were unforgiven, according to a Bloomberg News analysis of Paycheck Protection Program data, and most of them are less than $25,000.

*Note: Your Bloomberg Tax ID will be required to access Tax News.

Projector

Our Spotlight series sheds light on the careers and lives of tax professionals around the world. This week’s spotlight is on Cody S. Rogers, a partner at Stinson, LLP, in the firm’s real estate and public finance group in Washington. Rogers is focused on impact investment and community development projects nationwide with particular experience in New Market Tax Credit, or NMTC, and Historic Tax Credit, or HTC transactions. .

Quick Answer Numbers

Three novels were published after Hemingway’s death in 1961:

  • “Islands in the Stream” (1970)
  • “The Garden of Eden” (1986)
  • “True at First Light” (1999)

His memoir “A Moveable Feast” was published in 1964.

Be social

Follow Bloomberg Tax on TwitterFacebook, Instagram and LinkedIn, and check out Bloomberg Law on TikTok.

We also have a growing LinkedIn group where our authors, contributors and readers can share tax-related stories and exchange ideas. We hope you will join the conversation!

What did you think?

Your comments and suggestions are important to us, so please reach out to us on social media or email me directly at curb@bloombergindustry.com.

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DVIDS – News – Fort Campbell AER aims to raise $200,000 through annual campaign https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/dvids-news-fort-campbell-aer-aims-to-raise-200000-through-annual-campaign/ Tue, 08 Feb 2022 22:03:00 +0000 https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/dvids-news-fort-campbell-aer-aims-to-raise-200000-through-annual-campaign/ FORT CAMPBELL, Ky. – Army Emergency Relief Funds have helped soldiers and families overcome financial hardship for 80 years, and Fort Campbell is seeking to raise $200,000 to support the nonprofit mission during this year’s AER annual campaign. The installation hosted an AER launch ceremony Feb. 1 at division headquarters, and the contribution window for […]]]>

FORT CAMPBELL, Ky. – Army Emergency Relief Funds have helped soldiers and families overcome financial hardship for 80 years, and Fort Campbell is seeking to raise $200,000 to support the nonprofit mission during this year’s AER annual campaign.

The installation hosted an AER launch ceremony Feb. 1 at division headquarters, and the contribution window for soldiers and civilians will be open March 1 through May 13.

Zero-interest loans and grants distributed by AER help cover necessary expenses, from rent and utilities to food and vehicle repairs, and the program also provides scholarships.

While fundraising for these resources is an important part of the AER campaign, the top priority is making sure soldiers and families know they can access them.

“The AER campaign is primarily an information campaign,” said retired Lieutenant General Raymond Mason, AER headquarters director. “What keeps me awake at night is (the idea that) a soldier is in trouble and we don’t know it. We need to share this information again and again.

Command Sergeant Major Joseph Harbour, senior enlisted adviser in the garrison, said he has seen the impact of the EAR first-hand through his work with soldiers across the division.

“EAR is an essential lifeline when soldiers and families need it most,” he said. “And getting help through AER can be the difference between a short-term financial setback or a long-term, costly financial obligation.”

Harbor said the facility’s AER program approved more than 1,100 requests for assistance in 2021 and disbursed more than $1.9 million in loans and grants.

Because these loans and grants are zero-interest, soldiers and families are encouraged to make ARE their first choice for financial support.

“Fifty percent of our soldiers used payday loans,” Mason said. “And the reason for that is the stigma attached to finances. They don’t want anyone to know they’re in trouble. AER’s message is: don’t walk out the door, come to us.

Mason said choosing EAR helps soldiers avoid the high interest rates associated with payday loans and improves mission readiness.

“If they’re distracted by finances – can’t fix their car, can’t pay their rent, can’t put food on the table – they’re probably not focused on their MOS training,” he said. -he declares. “They’re not focused on their unity mission, and if we send them into battle, they’re potentially a danger to themselves and their buddies to their left and right.”

AER financial advisors are also dedicated to working with these soldiers so they can take charge of their money and avoid future emergencies.

“That combination of helping this soldier get out of the predicament he’s in and then following financial advice is absolutely critical,” Mason said. “Resilience is what it’s all about.”

The Screaming Eagles play an important role in making sure these services are available to their fellow soldiers, and Mason said AER’s goal is to keep them informed about what the program offers to encourage donations.

“Once you tell a soldier about it, they know about it and can decide to donate,” he said. “Our credo is ‘leave no comrade behind’. Most people think it’s the battlefield…but that’s also true here at home.

EAR has become even more valuable to soldiers and families amid the COVID-19 pandemic, said Terrence Jones, financial readiness program manager at Fort Campbell Army Community Service.

The AER program recently expanded its eligible expenses to cover costs associated with the pandemic, such as transportation and remote learning support. Jones said local participation in the program has increased significantly over the past 18 months.

“I hope to see more participation and support throughout the installation from the leaders and soldiers of this campaign cycle,” Jones said in a January interview with the Fort Campbell Courier. “People need this fund for things like unpaid rent, car repairs and emergency leave, so it’s important to have this fund and soldiers helping each other.” This prevents them from quitting their job to apply for these high interest rate loans. »

Harbor said unit leaders are a driving force for the installation’s AER contributions each year and asked them to make discussing the program with their Soldiers a priority.

“First we have to educate our soldiers,” he said. “Use the ARE as a tool to support unit readiness; making the EAR the first choice when soldiers need financial assistance…the bottom line is that when we take care of our soldiers at home, our units can stay focused on their training and our army will be ready to fight and win our nation’s wars.

Soldiers and civilians can contribute to the ARE at https://www.armyemergencyrelief.org from March 1 through May 13 by setting up a one-time payment or monthly donation. Service members can also set up donations through their unit leaders.

For more information, call Army Community Service-Financial Readiness Program at 270-798-5518. Services are located at 1501 William C. Lee Road.







Date taken: 02.04.2022
Date posted: 02.08.2022 17:03
Story ID: 414300
Site: FORT CAMPBELL, KY, USA





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Fun workshop to highlight the Children of the Carrefour https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/fun-workshop-to-highlight-the-children-of-the-carrefour/ Wed, 05 Jan 2022 05:11:33 +0000 https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/fun-workshop-to-highlight-the-children-of-the-carrefour/ Characteristics Journalist 4 hours ago Simeon Moodoo – A Reading of Children of the Crossroads by Simeon Moodoo will launch the Playwrights Workshop Trinbago (PWT) (MRTS) monthly reader drama series for 2022. This reading will be the first act of a three-act play. The theatrical series, held on the first Wednesday of each month, will […]]]>


Characteristics



Simeon Moodoo –

A Reading of Children of the Crossroads by Simeon Moodoo will launch the Playwrights Workshop Trinbago (PWT) (MRTS) monthly reader drama series for 2022. This reading will be the first act of a three-act play.

The theatrical series, held on the first Wednesday of each month, will continue online in light of precautionary measures against the covid19 pandemic, a press release said.

The reading will take place via Zoom Reunion only on January 5 at 7 p.m.

Children of the Crossroads follows Boysie, a 15-year-old high school student of Indo-Trinidadian descent and batting combatant, as he sets out on a journey to reclaim his legacy. His family decided to protect him from the gayelle, but as danger looms he finds himself in need of “high science” to protect his family.

In his brief note before the script, Moodoo, who is an MA candidate, said, “This piece is written in part as part of the MA in Cultural Studies at the Department of Literary, Cultural and Communication Studies, UWI, St Augustine campus. This is the practice-based component of the study, and it is based on the researcher’s auto-ethnographic journey, interviews conducted and an analysis of historical / scholarly accounts and recordings of Trinidadian martial traditions of combat in the United States. stick and whip. It is the result of exploring the contributions of the East Indies to Trinidadian culture through these martial ways.

Moodoo has been a drama and theater professor at the Department of Education for five years. He has been an educator in various schools including public / non-denominational schools and schools run by government assisted religious councils.

He has worked in community theater and educational theater through and in collaboration with theater companies such as Arts in Action (AiA), Máp Brulé and Halqa Productions, as well as various youth and community groups in Trinidad and Tobago.

He completed the Bachelor of Arts in Theater Arts (High Honors) in 2014 and the Bachelor of Science in Sociology (with a minor in International Relations) in 2011 at UWI, St Augustine.

Moodoo is also an award-winning national and regional playwright and director, as well as the founder and artistic director of Halqa Productions. He is founding director of the TT Performing Arts Network (TTPAN) and director of the Holistic Learning Center.

Playwrights Workshop Trinbago (PWT) invites actors, playwrights, directors, producers and the audience to join Zoom to listen to the reading and participate in the discussion to help the playwright in the further development of the script.

Join the Zoom meeting: https://us02web.zoom.us/j/82136776250

Meeting number: 821 3677 6250


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Toni Catany International Photography Center / mateoarquitectura https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/toni-catany-international-photography-center-mateoarquitectura/ Mon, 20 Dec 2021 02:00:00 +0000 https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/toni-catany-international-photography-center-mateoarquitectura/ Toni Catany International Photography Center / mateoarquitectura © Aldo Amoretti + 39 To share To share Facebook Twitter Pinterest WhatsApp To post Or https://www.archdaily.com/973802/toni-catany-international-photography-center-mateoarquitectura © Aldo Amoretti Text description provided by the architects. In the old town of Llucmajor (Mallorca), occupying part of the birthplace of photographer Toni Catany, we have built the International Center […]]]>


Toni Catany International Photography Center / mateoarquitectura

© Aldo Amoretti

© Aldo Amoretti© Aldo Amoretti© Aldo Amoretti© Aldo Amoretti+ 39

© Aldo Amoretti
© Aldo Amoretti

Text description provided by the architects. In the old town of Llucmajor (Mallorca), occupying part of the birthplace of photographer Toni Catany, we have built the International Center of Photography, based on the work and collection of this great artist.

© Aldo Amoretti
© Aldo Amoretti
© Aldo Amoretti
© Aldo Amoretti
© Aldo Amoretti
© Aldo Amoretti

The place, the history, the remains, the scale, the classic typology of houses closed to the outside and open to interior courtyards… all this obviously forms the basis of the project. They are ghosts or realities that accompany us, even if we have to control them.

© Aldo Amoretti
© Aldo Amoretti
© Aldo Amoretti
© Aldo Amoretti

But we have not forgotten that our mission here was to build a center of reference for contemporary museography as a setting conducive to exceptional works.

© Gabriel Ramon
© Gabriel Ramon

We have preserved vestiges, while rebuilding, we initially restored the facades with care …

© Gabriel Ramon
© Gabriel Ramon
Ground floor Plan
Ground floor Plan
© Gabriel Ramon
© Gabriel Ramon

Singular elements appear a staircase which takes off, another which recreates the chromatic universe of the artist in question …

© Aldo Amoretti
© Aldo Amoretti

Although the protagonist is always the space with an accompanying detail that is both radical and accessible.

© Aldo Amoretti
© Aldo Amoretti

This is a building constructed during the COVID-19 pandemic, with its various moments of isolation, distance and digitization. Yet here it was necessary to produce something concrete, close, manual, in a distant and sometimes hopelessly archaic world. It was not easy.



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Williams Lake Tribune welcomes new reporter / photographer to its newsroom – Williams Lake Tribune https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/williams-lake-tribune-welcomes-new-reporter-photographer-to-its-newsroom-williams-lake-tribune/ Fri, 05 Nov 2021 15:30:00 +0000 https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/williams-lake-tribune-welcomes-new-reporter-photographer-to-its-newsroom-williams-lake-tribune/ Growing up in Williams Lake, fate brought Ruth Lloyd back to her hometown and landed her in the famous newsroom of the Williams Lake Grandstand. “I look forward to sharing the stories of the diverse people and places of the Cariboo Chilcotin,” said Lloyd. “And get back to community journalism.” Having worked and lived in […]]]>


Growing up in Williams Lake, fate brought Ruth Lloyd back to her hometown and landed her in the famous newsroom of the Williams Lake Grandstand.

“I look forward to sharing the stories of the diverse people and places of the Cariboo Chilcotin,” said Lloyd. “And get back to community journalism.”

Having worked and lived in beautiful Fort St. James for ten years, where she was a reporter / photographer / editor for the local community newspaper The Caledonian Courier for nearly four of them, it moved south just as the COVID-19 pandemic was setting in.

Lloyd said that after a year of working with the amazing Cane Archeology team, she decided it was time to resume her journalism training and returned to writing and photography.

She trained at the Southern Alberta Institute of Technology (SAIT) in Calgary to earn a journalism degree.

While at SAIT, she worked as a journalist and then as a scene editor for the student newspaper Emery Weal.

Prior to moving to Fort St. James, Lloyd spent 10 years at the Cariboo Fire Center, including eight years as an initial attack firefighter, and enjoyed traveling to remote areas of the region.

A well-traveled adventurer, Lloyd has spent time biking, hiking, trying to climb rocks and surf waves in various parts of the world, but the Cariboo-Chilcotin has always held a place in his heart. She and her partner enjoy mountain biking, cross-country skiing, snowboarding and rock climbing in the area. Lloyd said she “tries to play hockey, even though I got there late in life, and I love the opportunity to try to improve my limited skills.”

Much of their free time is spent working in and around their home and meeting the needs and wants of their two furry babies, a rescue dog and an elderly three-legged cat.


ruth.lloyd@wltribune.com
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Williams Lake



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Zionsville artist helps others cope with grief with portraiture • Current Publishing https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/zionsville-artist-helps-others-cope-with-grief-with-portraiture-current-publishing/ Tue, 02 Nov 2021 10:00:56 +0000 https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/zionsville-artist-helps-others-cope-with-grief-with-portraiture-current-publishing/ After the sudden death of her 54-year-old husband in 2012, Zionsville resident D. Anne Jones founded a non-profit organization to help those who have lost loved ones unexpectedly, and in the process, she found a way to deal with her own grief. Jones, 61, is the founder, executive director and principal artist of Face to […]]]>


After the sudden death of her 54-year-old husband in 2012, Zionsville resident D. Anne Jones founded a non-profit organization to help those who have lost loved ones unexpectedly, and in the process, she found a way to deal with her own grief.

Jones, 61, is the founder, executive director and principal artist of Face to Face Fine Art, a Zionsville-based nonprofit that provides free hand-painted portraits for families or individuals who have lost a loved one. dear as a result of sudden, unexpected or tragic death. . Jones created the organization to help others in their grieving process and to commemorate the deceased by creating “a lasting memory of their life.”

In 2012, Jones lost a sister to a brain tumor. Her mother, a 22-year pancreatic cancer survivor, died seven weeks later. And during her mother’s funeral on Mother’s Day before, another tragedy struck.

“We said, ‘Next Saturday is going to be a fun time, it’s my son’s wedding.’ And that morning my husband didn’t wake up. We had a wedding, but it was so surreal, ”Jones said.

D. Anne Jones holds a portrait of her late husband, Christopher. (Photo courtesy of D. Anne Jones)

Jones’ husband Christopher died at the age of 54, when Jones was 51. But before her death, Jones had already thought about forming the association, and her death reaffirmed her belief that it was something she had to pursue. Face to Face was created in 2013, and over 200 portraits have been produced for those selected by the group’s board of directors.

Initially, the portraits are mainly done in pastel, a kind of chalk. Jones has produced portraits for individuals and families across the United States. She also presented 18 portraits to individuals and families in Jerusalem during a pilgrimage in 2016.

“We put them under glass, and when we took them to the Holy Land, we had photographs of the drawings themselves put on a canvas, we rolled up the canvas and brought it in, so I started to do it. Jones said. “Now when I do the designs I take a photo, upload it to the internet and we present it with a framed canvas. It’s much more visible and durable. You don’t have to. worry about spreading it or breaking the glass.

Over the past eight years, Jones has produced portraits of police and firefighters who have died in the line of duty, as well as children and recently deceased, and those who have passed away long ago.

“One lady, her grandson had an aneurysm when she was 5,” Jones said. “She couldn’t stop seeing him in the hospital with all the tubes going in and out. We did a portrait of him and it reassured him. That’s all. We help them through the grieving process, commemorate the life of their loved one, and keep their memory alive for generations to come. “

While Jones has helped others overcome their grief, she has also found solace in her work.

“It’s been really therapeutic for me,” Jones said. “I have been a portrait painter for 49 years, since the age of 12. For 10 years at Crown Point, I have done weekend art shows, craft shows, and shopping malls 46 weeks a year. It helped me become good at portraiture. I was fed up with doing shows and got the idea before someone died, and it was kind of like God or fortune or whatever put me through that so I could identify myself with other people.

In 2019, Jones ‘daughter Leah unexpectedly passed away at age 37, leaving behind one of Jones’ grandchildren. The loss inspired Jones to move from South Bend to Zionsville on February 29, 2020, to raise her 11-year-old grandchild. Weeks after his move, the COVID-19 pandemic began, forcing the two to socially distance themselves from the rest of their family, who live in central Indiana, for several months.

During the pandemic, however, Jones made a full-time commitment to Face to Face and she continues to create portraits out of Zionsville.

“When you feel bad and you’ve done something for someone else, it makes you feel better,” Jones said. “When I first started doing them – and not so much now – I got along fine, I didn’t cry every day because of my husband and my sister, mom. And I would start to cry. I couldn’t understand what was going on, and it was kind of like I felt the pain of the people I work with before doing a portrait. So, I get to know them, and I talk to them and I pray on the portrait, that it be a source of healing and joy in their life (that of their loved ones).

To learn more, visit facetofacefineart.org.

A source of healing

Zionsville resident D. Anne Jones, Founder, Executive Director and Principal Artist of Face to Face Fine Art, has produced hand-painted portraits for families or loved ones. Below, some portraits:

Emma Kraus, a grade eight student at Zionsville West Middle School, passed away suddenly on October 4, 2020. Artist D. Anne Jones presents the portrait to her mother, Alexandra Lopez. (Photos submitted by D. Anne Jones)

A portrait of Ronald Lewis is shown to his wife, Sandy, and his family, including Cindi Walker Kawka and brother, Greg, on July 17, 2020. Lewis died suddenly during the COVID-19 stay-at-home order.

A portrait of Lake County Corrections Officer Britney Meux was presented to her family in May 2014. Meux was jogging with three other Lake County Corrections officers in March 2012 when she was hit and killed by a drunk driver.


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