black white – David Hemmings Bird Photography http://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/ Fri, 04 Mar 2022 02:07:14 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-2021-06-25T155134.587.png black white – David Hemmings Bird Photography http://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/ 32 32 Francesca Woodman’s photography https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/francesca-woodmans-photography/ Fri, 04 Mar 2022 00:11:11 +0000 https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/francesca-woodmans-photography/ One of the most attractive photographers of the 20and century, Francesca Woodman’s images are fleeting and ephemeral, executed with ghostly fragility and startling innocence. Poignant and surreal, at times nightmarish and intensely dark, his photography speaks to the mind, haunts the heart with a feverish honesty not too often found in this material world. Renowned […]]]>

One of the most attractive photographers of the 20and century, Francesca Woodman’s images are fleeting and ephemeral, executed with ghostly fragility and startling innocence. Poignant and surreal, at times nightmarish and intensely dark, his photography speaks to the mind, haunts the heart with a feverish honesty not too often found in this material world. Renowned for her black-and-white portraits that often featured their creator as the subject, Woodman’s images are made all the more visceral by the fact that the artist’s life was so tragically cut short. We only have what Francesca left behind, but it is by no means a work that is missing. In fact, quite the opposite.

Untitled, Providence, Rhode Island, 1975-1978, vintage silver print. Image: 7 3/8 x 9 1/2in. (18.6 x 24cm). Courtesy of Woodman Family Foundation and Marian Goodman Gallery © Woodman Family Foundation / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York, 2021

The Marian Goodman Gallery in New York, in collaboration with the Woodman Family Foundation, organized the recent solo exhibition, Francesca Woodman: Alternate Histories, which featured many previously unseen photographs of the artist. The gallery has worked closely with the Woodman family for over two decades, and their work to preserve its legacy has been of the utmost importance.

Francesca Stern Woodman was born on April 3, 1958, in Denver, Colorado, into an exceptionally artistic family. Her father, George, was an abstract painter and her mother, Betty, a potter. Although not known in the art world, the Woodmans encouraged Francesca and her brother, Charlie, to fully immerse themselves in creativity. They also spent much of their time living in Italy, and in 1975 the Woodmans purchased an old stone farmhouse in the Florentine countryside, where the family would spend their subsequent summers. Francesca was an avid reader, which, coupled with considerable time spent in the culturally rich country of Italy, as well as growing up in the artistically stimulating environment her parents created, set the young girl apart from the masses and helped form a truly unique world. personality – a personality unbrainwashed by America’s pervasive pop culture, beaming relentlessly on TVs nationwide.

Untitled, Providence, Rhode Island, 1975-1978, vintage silver print. Image: 3 7/8 x 3 7/8 in. (9.8 x 9.7cm). Courtesy of Woodman Family Foundation and Marian Goodman Gallery © Woodman Family Foundation / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York, 2021

Francesca made her first self-portrait at the age of thirteen. Her father had given her a camera shortly before she went to boarding school at the historic Abbot Academy in Andover, Massachusetts, and found himself greatly impressed by the fervor with which his daughter turned. towards the medium. She was completely natural. In 1975, after graduating from high school in Boulder, Colorado, Francesca attended Rhode Island School of Design in Providence, where she again studied with photographer Wendy Snyder MacNeil, with whom she first studied at the Abbot Academy.

Of particular interest is the size in which Woodman chose to print his work. Often his prints are not much larger than the original negatives. This automatically forces the viewer into a more intimate experience. It also leaves a semblance of mystery. There are no unknowns in a print that has been enlarged to a much larger size. Everything is staring you straight in the eye. And it was all part of Francesca’s method, her very complex vision. Because with Francesca Woodman, nothing is accidental. She knew exactly what she was doing. A well-educated and extremely eloquent scholar, she kept detailed journals for most of her life, in which she recorded much of her thought processes and feelings, as well as what she was trying to achieve with her work. . But when it came to the actual execution of the shots, when Francesca was behind the camera herself, she let intuition take over.

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The CCP and the Phoenix Art Museum host a Japanese exhibition devoted to historical and contemporary photography https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/the-ccp-and-the-phoenix-art-museum-host-a-japanese-exhibition-devoted-to-historical-and-contemporary-photography/ Wed, 02 Mar 2022 08:03:10 +0000 https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/the-ccp-and-the-phoenix-art-museum-host-a-japanese-exhibition-devoted-to-historical-and-contemporary-photography/ University of Arizona Creative Photography Centeras part of its historic collaboration with the Phoenix Art Museumprovides unprecedented insight into how post-World War II Japanese photographers attempted to counter their government’s propaganda. With 87 photographs preserved over many years, the Phoenix Art Museum hosts the exhibition “Farewell to Photography: The Hitachi Collection of Postwar Japanese Photographs, […]]]>

University of Arizona Creative Photography Centeras part of its historic collaboration with the Phoenix Art Museumprovides unprecedented insight into how post-World War II Japanese photographers attempted to counter their government’s propaganda.

With 87 photographs preserved over many years, the Phoenix Art Museum hosts the exhibition “Farewell to Photography: The Hitachi Collection of Postwar Japanese Photographs, 1961 to 1989” until mid-summer.

Dr. Audrey Sands, assistant curator of photography for the Norton family, spoke about the upcoming exhibit.

“We have a responsibility as a cultural institution to reflect the incredible diversity of our audiences,” said Dr Sands.

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The Hitachi collection is one of three annual photography exhibitions hosted by the Phoenix Art Museum, drawing from the CCP’s unrivaled collection of historic and contemporary photography.

The Hitachi images of post-World War II Japanese photographers attempt to change the narrative their country published after the war. In one image, a flock of birds sits on a tree, as three elderly men stand outside a doorway, a couple close their eyes as they smoke with the silhouette of a man walking down a hallway.

“These photographers were against traditional practices and what was traditionally accepted by the art world, the photographic world, and government-sanctioned practices,” Sands said. “They inspired a whole generation of artists. I think that’s a real lesson: think outside of the boundaries you inherit.

The origins of the exhibition began in 1988 when the CCP set out to acquire works by contemporary photographers in post-World War II Japan through grants from the Hitachi Corporation. After recovering these photographs, the UA Center collaborated with the Phoenix Art Museum to present the collection in the state of Arizona.

Sands said she hopes the exhibit will expand and challenge the worldview and perspectives of visitors to the Southwestern United States. As part of the team that brought together the PCC and the Phoenix Art Museum for the exhibition, it was important to present the parallels of post-war Japan. and the present day.

The post-war government in Japan soon used the medium of photography as a propaganda tool. The government’s documentary style sent a message to Japanese citizens that what they were seeing was the only truth they needed to heed.

“These photographers meant that all photography is manipulation and distortion,” Sands said.

RELATED: The Center for Creative Photography introduces digital viewing during the pandemic

The Japanese were also dealing with the consequences of the American military occupation and the influx of Western culture that impacted and distorted Japanese culture to the point where these photographers wondered, “What is national identity?” »

The photograph “New couple who closed their eyes, Tokyo,showing a couple taken together in the middle of a shot, their eyes closed, smoking, is an example of distancing from the expected complacency and highlighting a new approach to photography.

“It symbolizes this moment in photography, signaling a totally new approach to vision. It alludes to a kind of beyond and a refusal to meet gazes and suggests that photography can be a screen between two worlds. There is a kind of surrealism in this image,” Sands said.

Other photographic techniques that grew out of the resistance against government propaganda were to shoot higher angles and boost contrast for grain in black and white photos. One of the biggest that is featured in the exhibition is the are-bure-boke, translated as “rough, blurry and blurry”, which can be seen in the photo “Ishikawamon, Kanazawaas a group of crows perched atop many branches with a dim light behind them.

“All of the exhibits are the result of collaborative work between so many individuals in the museums,” Sands said. “It was not just my work that entered the exhibition, but the collective work of my many colleagues at CCP and the Phoenix Art Museum.”


*El Inde Arizona is a news service of the University of Arizona School of Journalism.


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Epic documentary follows mountaineers inspired by explorer-photographer Brad Washburn https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/epic-documentary-follows-mountaineers-inspired-by-explorer-photographer-brad-washburn/ Tue, 01 Mar 2022 07:52:06 +0000 https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/epic-documentary-follows-mountaineers-inspired-by-explorer-photographer-brad-washburn/ The sanctity of space is a new documentary from Dogwoof – a London-based production company responsible for the Oscar- and BAFTA-winning film Free Solo, and BAFTA-winning documentaries The act of killing and black fish. Inspired by the black and white photos of American explorer and photographer Brad Washburn, professional climbers Freddie Wilkinson, Renan Ozturk and […]]]>

The sanctity of space is a new documentary from Dogwoof – a London-based production company responsible for the Oscar- and BAFTA-winning film Free Solo, and BAFTA-winning documentaries The act of killing and black fish.

Inspired by the black and white photos of American explorer and photographer Brad Washburn, professional climbers Freddie Wilkinson, Renan Ozturk and Zack Smith attempt to traverse the uncharted territory of Denali National Parks The Tooth Traverse – a series of peaks including Sugar Tooth, Bear Tooth and Moose’s Tooth, which was never attempted in one go.

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How Photographer Rick Sammon Captured the Blue Swallow Motel in HDR https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/how-photographer-rick-sammon-captured-the-blue-swallow-motel-in-hdr/ Sun, 27 Feb 2022 16:29:43 +0000 https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/how-photographer-rick-sammon-captured-the-blue-swallow-motel-in-hdr/ Photographer Rick Sammon used HDR photography to capture the historic Blue Swallow Motel in New Mexico along legendary US Route 66. His goal was to achieve the foreground tones and mood in the retro scene- enlightened. Built in 1939, the Blue Swallow is one of the longest continuously operating motels on the stretch of Route […]]]>

Photographer Rick Sammon used HDR photography to capture the historic Blue Swallow Motel in New Mexico along legendary US Route 66. His goal was to achieve the foreground tones and mood in the retro scene- enlightened.

Built in 1939, the Blue Swallow is one of the longest continuously operating motels on the stretch of Route 66 in New Mexico. The small, 12-unit L-shaped property is a famous site on the freeway and is listed on the National Register of Historic Landmarks. Places

Sammon’s image of the landmark was created as a 7-stop exposure sequence to record the rising sun at 8:30 a.m. in March 2013. Sammon wanted the viewer of his photo to be able to see into the building, but he also wanted preserve details around the Sun.

This photo was taken on a Canon EOS 6D with a Canon EF 17-40mm lens set to 24mm and f/22.

The resulting images were compiled in Photomatix, a tone mapping program for HDR (High Dynamic Range) photography, after which Sammon played around with Photoshop and with Nik Color Efex.

Set a photography goal

“I planned to take this image when I was in New York,” says New York-based Sammon, who is also a photography and guitar teacher. “I checked the sunrise time to see where the sun would rise on the day I was there…I had seen many pictures of the motel so I had a good idea of ​​what I wanted.

“I wanted to make a dramatic image of perhaps Route 66’s most famous landmark for the cover of my book, co-authored with my wife Susan, The Route 66 road trip: Eat, stay, play and shoot like a pro.

The secret to getting good HDR

“To capture the full dynamic range of the scene, keep shooting underexposed images [with bracketing] until you no longer have “flickers” on your camera’s LCD screen, and continue taking overexposed images until you can see in the shadows of the image while looking at the image. ‘LCD screen’, writes Rick Sammon on his blog. “The larger the contrast range, the more photos you need to take.”

Photographer Rick Sammon
Photographer Rick Sammon. “This red-eyed tree frog from Costa Rica must have heard one of my samonisms: when you think you’re close, get closer!” he says. © Susan Sammon

There wasn’t a lot of thought applied to selecting the focal length of the lens as it was all about the color and the mood it created. Sammon noticed small details like the blue flowerpot that stood in front of the office building. The night before, the photographer asked the motel owner to turn his car around to face him when he took the picture with the sun rising behind him.

Using a small aperture for solar stars

To get good sun shots, Sammon closed his zoom lens down to its minimum aperture of f/22 and partially blocked the Sun with the motel sign for better sun star effect and to avoid getting excessive lens flare in the objective.

Although this is a backlit shot, the ground provides enough fill light for the front of the car and the HDR brings out the shadow detail on the white car. Also, when shooting at f/22 at this distance, there is no possibility of illuminating shadows with a hot shoe.

Having the neon lights on for this shot may have been weakly recorded, but Sammon wanted this morning shot to be completely different from another night, which had the neon lights on in all their glory.

“I waited until there were no more cars on the road,” Sammon recalls. “But only three cars passed during my shoot.”

Contrasting tones for visual excitement

The juxtaposition of the cool blue tones of the signage and sky above the center contrasting with the warm pink tones below the motel desk provides the contrast of contrasting colors. This lends visual excitement to the image. Route 66 is all about color, and that same image, if done in black and white, wouldn’t have worked as well, Sammon says.

The photographer only spent half an hour on this shot – once he decided on the composition he wanted, he set up a tripod and took the bracketed footage.

motel building
Sammon thinning the concrete in preparation for the night shot © Susan Sammon

Sunrise or sunset?

If the motel had commissioned the photographer, he might have added a model wearing “1960s clothing,” he says, and he would undoubtedly have photographed the sunrise and sunset. He photographed this property twice, three years apart, but only at sunrise and sunset each time.

motel

At sunset, the photographer had his rental car headlights illuminating the front of the parked car, but Sammon says he prefers the sunrise one.

Despite all the effort, it was definitely worth it, as Sammon tells us that his photo of the Blue Swallow Motel based in Tucumcari, New Mexico is definitely among his top 10 pictures.

“It’s not about HDR or depth of field or sharpness etc,” Sammon said. PetaPixel. “Mood matters most.”


About the photographer: Rick Sammon, a Canon Explorer of Light, has been a professional travel, landscape, wildlife and cultural photographer since the age of 40 (now 71). He wrote, photographed and published 43 books (not a misprint) on photography. Sammon seems to be one of the busiest photographers on the planet – dividing his time between creating images, leading photo workshops and making personal appearances. Sammon, who has photographed in over 100 countries, began his professional photography career as an underwater photographer, producing six underwater books and leading scuba diving expeditions to all seven seas.


About the Author: Phil Mistry is a photographer and teacher based in Atlanta, GA. He started one of the first digital camera courses in New York at the International Center of Photography in the 90s. He was director and teacher of Sony/Popular Photography magazine’s Digital Days workshops. You can reach him here.


how i got hit is a weekly PetaPixel feature that is released every Sunday. If you want to share the story of how one of your best or favorite photos was made, we’d love to hear from you!


Image credit: Sammon Thinning Concrete and Sammon with Red-Eyed Frog by Susan Sammon. All other Blue Swallow Motel photos by Rick Sammon.

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New pop-up photography exhibit puts a human face on San Antonio cyclists https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/new-pop-up-photography-exhibit-puts-a-human-face-on-san-antonio-cyclists/ Fri, 25 Feb 2022 00:35:27 +0000 https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/new-pop-up-photography-exhibit-puts-a-human-face-on-san-antonio-cyclists/ There’s a new exhibition of ephemeral photographs that only lasts two evenings, and it has an interesting story. Jeff Moore said the pop-up was from a group of cyclists SATX social ride. “We’re kind of a grassroots cycling organization that gets people out on the road every Tuesday,” Moore said. “So people who haven’t ridden […]]]>

There’s a new exhibition of ephemeral photographs that only lasts two evenings, and it has an interesting story. Jeff Moore said the pop-up was from a group of cyclists SATX social ride.

“We’re kind of a grassroots cycling organization that gets people out on the road every Tuesday,” Moore said. “So people who haven’t ridden in a long time or are just having a casual ride, they go out and enjoy it on Tuesday nights.”

Olivia Youngblood.jpg

You may have seen them downtown, riding en masse.

“We ride downtown, usually between 8 and 15 miles. Some of our rides are more family friendly and some are a bit more sporty,” he said.

The exhibit features photos of these SATX cyclists, mostly taken by Dan Rosales.

“We do these portraits of cyclists, we have been doing it for seven years; it started in 2015,” Moore said. “And the idea is that we take images of runners, intimate black and white images, and they’re holding up a sign.”

The sign each is holding tells something telling about each of them.

“We have about 40 different signs of different family designations, like grandmother, grandfather, grandson, tio, tia, son, daughter, brother, sister. And the point of that has always been to humanize the face of cyclists to the non-cycling public,” Moore said. “Some of them are really amazing. You will see a grandmother, a mother and her daughter, all riding their bikes together.

The idea for this pop-up came about because San Antonio’s record for monitoring cyclists on the roads isn’t that good.

“This is due to our experiences with aggressive drivers and people injured and killed by vehicles,” he said.

The exhibit opens at 5:30 p.m. on Friday and 6 p.m. on Saturday.

“It will take place at the Dry Goods building at 107 North Flores St. We are going to have about 150 to 200 portraits hanging in this wonderful space,” Moore said. “We will have some collages. We will have a DJ, a bar.

The Dry Goods building is across from Old City Hall on the corner of Commerce and Flores.

“It’s just above 7/11. It’s an amazing historic building that’s been redone, and it’s a really nice space for something like that,” he said.

Moore noted that if you ride your bike there, they have a place to park it inside.

Rocio Guenther & Brian Clements.jpg

Rocio Guenther and Brian Clements

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The friendship between 50-year-old artists takes center stage in a new exhibition in Los Angeles – ARTnews.com https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/the-friendship-between-50-year-old-artists-takes-center-stage-in-a-new-exhibition-in-los-angeles-artnews-com/ Wed, 16 Feb 2022 14:00:00 +0000 https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/the-friendship-between-50-year-old-artists-takes-center-stage-in-a-new-exhibition-in-los-angeles-artnews-com/ In 1969, three artists, all mothers and divorcees, met at the University of California, Irvine, where they had enrolled in the school’s new MFA program. Their introduction to each other would prove transformative. The artists, Barbara T. Smith, Marcia Hafif and Nancy Buchanan, were all graduates of West Coast colleges and had each previously demonstrated […]]]>

In 1969, three artists, all mothers and divorcees, met at the University of California, Irvine, where they had enrolled in the school’s new MFA program. Their introduction to each other would prove transformative. The artists, Barbara T. Smith, Marcia Hafif and Nancy Buchanan, were all graduates of West Coast colleges and had each previously demonstrated a penchant for creating unconventional art. At a time when Abstract Expressionism was still favored in institutions, UC Irvine’s MFA students and faculty—among them Robert Irwin and Larry Bell—went against the grain, often using their bodies as vehicles in performances and creating increasingly political installations. .

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At UC Irvine, two of the artists created an alternative co-op called F-Space in a nearby warehouse with ten of their classmates, including Chris Burden. There they could experiment without too much supervision from the school administration. “Irvine was different,” Buchanan said in an interview. “Everyone was interested in what the other was doing. There was this solidarity.

It was at F-Space that Burden staged his famous radical performance Shoot and Smith her bare frieze, both in 1971. In the first, Burden instructed a friend to shoot him at close range; in the latter, Smith orchestrated nude models to stick on gallery walls, creating a human frieze. As Smith explained, the gallery was “a kind of sanctuary for the investigation of ideas that was not available in other arenas” or simply a “politically safe space”.

Video art installation in the gallery

Installation view, “How we are in time and space.”
Ian Byers-Gamber

Both Smith and Buchanan became involved with the LA Woman’s Building in the 1970s, a flagship of the Southern California feminist art scene that became a hotbed of experimental artistic creation. Hafif, who died in 2018 at age 88, took a slightly different path. She moved to New York shortly after completing her MFA, living there for nearly 30 years before returning to the Los Angeles area. She was recognized for her conceptually-minded monochrome paintings, mainly in Europe. And now the three are the subject of an exhibit that taps into their 50-year relationship, titled ‘How We Are in Time and Space,’ on view through June 12, at the Armory Art Center. from Pasadena.

“They all made such disparate works and were really experimenting,” said Michael Ned Holte, the exhibit’s curator. With this exhibition, Holte wants to reassess the production of these three artists through the prism of their long-standing friendship and understudied relationships. He continues: “It’s really by dint of spending a lot of time with them and thinking about the points of intersection”, that he draws in the three main themes of the exhibition, areas where their practices converge: the body, communication and living. “This is my version of Nancy, Marcia and Barbara, and not necessarily their versions of each other,” he added.

The art scene around UC Irvine students in the 60s and 70s has already been the subject of a major exhibition: “Best Kept Secret”, curated by Grace Kook-Anderson at the Laguna Art Museum in 2011 as part of of the Getty Foundation’s first exhibition. Pacific Standard Time Initiative. But Holte wanted to take a different approach to analyzing that era.

“In a way, it’s about the social milieu,” Holte said of her show. “There’s a kind of call-and-response aspect to their work,” adding that he’s taken creative license to “make explicit connections that are somewhat implicit” between the three artists.

One of the centerpieces of the showcase is the only collaborative work ever made by Buchanan and Smith. The black and white video installation With love from A to B (1975) is a one-shot performance that shows the artists’ two hands resting on a table. In a dramatic score, their hands mirror each other, beginning to gesture as they act out a scene of unrequited love. Two versions are featured in the exhibit: one showing Smith splitting his finger with a metal razor blade and drawing blood, the other showing Smith sparing his finger. In Notes and Bob and Nancy (1970-1977), Buchanan and his classmate Bob Walker appear in a series of edited Super-8 films shot by Hafif, who narrates the film as if it were a scripted film, pondering relationships to both authentic and interpreted.

Video image with a woman wrapped in an American flag

Nancy Buchanan, The end of all our dreams1982.
Courtesy of the artist and Charlie James Gallery, Los Angeles

Other works question ideas about lived space. Holte sees two works using scale house models as showing a common thread between Buchanan and Hafif, who had both left behind their middle-class marriages when they met. In the work, the two examine the demands of their previous domestic lives. At Buchanan’s American Dream #7 (The price is wrong), 1975, a sculpture of an intricate living room interior plays a small-scale video about real estate speculation from the Reagan era to the late 1980s. In the video, Michael Zinzun, a Pasadena-based activist and former Black Panther who made himself known for fighting against police brutality in Los Angeles, begins by repeating the saying of Walter Benjamin: “I am here to remind you that no document of culture is at the same time a document of barbarism. Holte positions this in the same section as Hafif oval houses (2002), a miniature sculpture of an ultra-minimalist dwelling, which he describes as “austere and highly utopian”. As Buchanan examines the conspicuous consumption that manifested itself during the Los Angeles housing crisis decades ago, Hafif imagines what the minimum conditions are for existence. “They both work in a similar idiom, but formally it couldn’t be more different,” Holte said.

In another Buchanan video, The end of all our dreams (1982), the artist focuses on the anxieties linked to armed violence and the threat of nuclear war through a montage of archival images and documentary footage. Buchanan’s personal ties seep into the film: text and images echo his father’s concerns about the war. Chief scientist of the US Air Force in the 1950s, he advocated for nuclear weapons to remain out of government control. In much of her work, through drawings and videos, Buchanan says, she is particularly concerned with holding the viewer’s attention. “If you have to get close to something, then the work is in your personal space, and maybe it bypasses some of the conceptualizing that people do when they look at art – they take a step back,” said she declared. “I wanted people to lean forward.”

The staff figures prominently in many of the works on display. Some address primary themes related to motherhood and death. At Smith’s Kiss a forbidden placefrom 1975, the artist leads an hour-long live performance inspired by an incident four years earlier in which she nearly drowned. At that time, she was in the process of separating from her husband, who forbade her to see their children. While walking in a local ocean inlet in California, Smith contemplated letting the water rush in – not swimming to safety as the tide grew stronger. She wondered, was there a reason to live? “The answer was yes,” she concluded. “You must stay alive for your children.”

Black and white photo of a man and a woman eating together

Barbara T.Smith, A week in the life of… 1975.
Courtesy of the artist and The Box, Los Angeles.

In the first act of Kiss a forbidden place, which Smith performed in front of an audience of spectators, she recreates this experience in a Las Vegas swimming pool that serves as a substitute for the ocean waters in which she nearly died. Here, an audio recording of Smith describing her familiarity with the ocean plays, as she swims to the bottom of the pool to retrieve a cross. In the second act, she takes the audience to a nearby desert where she discovers a cup-shaped “oasis” filled with water. It ends with her fleeing with an unnamed man, leaving the mob to find her way back, to which Smith concludes, “I’m well.”

Smith is good at pulling off complex performances, often sacrificing both bodily autonomy and personal time. In A week in the life Of… (1975), Smith held an auction to raise money for a local artists’ co-operative space that was in danger of closing. Artist Allan Kaprow was a runner up for the auction, with other art world figures, like Paul McCarthy, in the crowd. The bidders, including peers and friends, competed for blocks of one-on-one time with Barbara. It took her a year to complete the 36 time-lots she had sold, documenting the encounter in journal entries and letters. One of the winning bidders was a writer who managed to buy a full week, using the time to study Smith for a performance art book. “I spent a week living in his space,” she recently recalled. “It was very risky. It was more risky for a woman.

The only work in the exhibition that connects the three artists is sympathetic magic (1972), a work of mail art initiated by Buchanan. For its chosen participants, including Hafif and Smith, are tasked with sending a personal item — a photo of a grandmother or a letter from an ex-boyfriend — to someone they didn’t know. Like the others in the showcase, the works were based on a collective of artists disrupting the social status quo, whose roots were laid during their brief time together at UC Irvine. “It’s not typical,” Smith said of their decades-long friendship. “The connection of our experience” overshadowed all other connections to the art world, Smith added. “I had other artistic friendships, none of them had this longevity. It’s totally unique.

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Tatura’s Jacob Dedman takes second place in Photographer of the Year award https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/taturas-jacob-dedman-takes-second-place-in-photographer-of-the-year-award/ Thu, 10 Feb 2022 02:33:06 +0000 https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/taturas-jacob-dedman-takes-second-place-in-photographer-of-the-year-award/ Snap: Jacob Dedman with his precious camera. Photo by Digital Journey photography Saved What started as a hobby using a point-and-shoot digital camera soon turned into two mirrorless DSLRs for the trip to all the scenic spots Jacob Dedman visited. Jacob, 17, from Tatura, is the mastermind behind Digital Journey Photography, his online photography business, […]]]>

Snap: Jacob Dedman with his precious camera. Photo by Digital Journey photography Saved

What started as a hobby using a point-and-shoot digital camera soon turned into two mirrorless DSLRs for the trip to all the scenic spots Jacob Dedman visited.

Jacob, 17, from Tatura, is the mastermind behind Digital Journey Photography, his online photography business, which allows him to seize every opportunity possible to get the perfect shot.

Kind of like spending 10 to 15 hours – or as her mother Cheryl Dedman would say, more like 20 to 30 hours – on hand to capture her winning entry in the junior category of australian photography magazine photographer of the year award.

The prized photograph tells a story of its own, but in 1000 words, Jacob recalls that the photo was taken in a less than ideal situation.

The Dedman family were ready for a holiday in Western Australia in July last year when the night before state borders closed, leaving the family to spend a holiday in South Australia.

Jacob said the family was fine for about five days before borders also collapsed in South Australia, but in retrospect the tight restrictions had an upside.

“We are coming into the caravan park and a railway line is right in front of the caravan park, I saw it and immediately thought, great photo opportunities there,” he said. he declares.

The day began as usual for the photographer, rising before dawn to capture the serene lighting.

“I was just taking pictures of the train cars in the industrial lot, and I was like, ‘why don’t I get on them?’ Because a person makes a really good focal point in a photo and that can make the photo,” he said.

The self-timer went and, with over 200 images taken, Jacob said one photo in particular stood out and “just worked”.

“It really reflected how things were at the time, the next chapter of ‘where do we go now? “, That’s what I called it,” he said.

Runner-up: Jacob’s image captioned “Where to go now?” finished second in australian photography Photographer of the Year Award. Photo by Digital Journey Photography Registered

The monthly photography magazine reaches a national audience and has received over 3,000 entries for the awards; Jacob also entered the top 30 in the Black and White category.

With runner-up status, Jacob won a $200 Camera House voucher to use towards his growing collection of gear.

The placement in the competition came as a shock to Jacob and his parents, only revealed when opening a copy of the magazine.

“I couldn’t bear to watch, it was just very suspenseful, wasn’t it? As soon as he showed me, I was, you could say, ecstatic,” Ms Dedman said.

“We were so proud and really happy that Jacob’s work was recognized.”

Self-taught in addition to an online course, Jacob said he learned his craft by doing, reading and writing about his work, and through home schooling he had the chance to grow further. his practice.

A support network also aided early morning awakenings and scenic getaways, rooted in finding the optimal scenic location.

“He always had a creative way of seeing things differently, always highlighting something that I never would have noticed, and it showed in the places we went as well,” Ms Dedman said.

“So I saw it was a great way to connect him to his education, I started to revolve his schoolwork around his photography.”

The image ‘where to go now?’ encapsulates the 17-year-old’s ever-evolving photography style and dedication to art.

He hopes to continue to grow as a photographer and teach others through his YouTube channel.

“I think I’ve probably borrowed all the books in Victoria Library on photography,” he laughs.

“I would like that to be my career, and that’s what I want to keep aiming for.”

To keep up to date with Jacob’s journey, visit www.digitaljourneyphotography.com or Digital Journey Photography on Facebook and Youtube and @djphoto2004 on Instagram.

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Why this photographer has been on a mission for decades to take a portrait of all animal species in captivity https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/why-this-photographer-has-been-on-a-mission-for-decades-to-take-a-portrait-of-all-animal-species-in-captivity/ Fri, 04 Feb 2022 22:34:26 +0000 https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/why-this-photographer-has-been-on-a-mission-for-decades-to-take-a-portrait-of-all-animal-species-in-captivity/ Joel Sartore is excited to come to Calgary this weekend — to see a bird. The National Geographic The photographer says the Calgary Zoo is the only place where the greater sage-grouse, an iconic bird of western North America, is cared for by humans, thanks to a breeding program established in 2016. He wants to […]]]>

Joel Sartore is excited to come to Calgary this weekend — to see a bird.

The National Geographic The photographer says the Calgary Zoo is the only place where the greater sage-grouse, an iconic bird of western North America, is cared for by humans, thanks to a breeding program established in 2016. He wants to document it.

For 12 years, Sartore has made it his mission to photograph all animal species in captivity, “from ants to elephants”. It’s part of a project called Photo Ark that aims to raise awareness about the extinction crisis.

There are approximately 20,000 animal species in zoos, aquariums and wildlife sanctuaries around the world. So far, Sartore has photographed around 12,000, all on black or white backgrounds.

Two golden snub-nosed monkeys in Ocean Park Hong Kong. All of Sartore’s animal portraits for the Photo Ark are done on solid black or white backgrounds. (© Joel Sartore/National Geographic Photo Ark)

“We all do them so people can really see these animals, look them in the eye,” Sartore told listeners. The last straight line Thursday. “People can just see that there is great intelligence out there and these creatures are worth saving.”

In Canada, populations of endangered animals face threats including pollution, loss of biodiversity, overexploitation of commercial species and loss of habitat, all potentially exacerbated by climate change.

Worldwide, more than 40,000 plant and animal species are threatened with extinction, according to the International Union for Conservation of Nature’s Red List.

Sartore knows there are criticisms of wildlife being kept in captivity, but thinks zoos can help raise awareness.

A pair of red wolves at the Great Plains Zoo in Sioux Falls, SD (© Joel Sartore/National Geographic Photo Ark)

“I don’t think anyone likes a bad zoo, but good zoos where there’s abundant attention and care, they educate the public. They keep us connected to nature,” he said.

Sartore says zoos are also helping by restoring destroyed habitat and establishing captive breeding programs, such as efforts by zoos across Canada to save the Vancouver Island marmot from certain extinction. .

“This animal isn’t quite out of the woods yet, but at least it’s stable. That’s a big deal.”

Tricks of the trade

So how does Sartore capture his animal portraits?

He says he photographs more dangerous animals, like lions, tigers and bears, through a wire or mesh barrier.

A banded iguana from the Fiji Islands at the Los Angeles Zoo. (© Joel Sartore/National Geographic Photo Ark)

For smaller, faster-moving creatures, like frogs or bumblebees, “it’s more about containment.” The animal enters a small white fabric tent, and only Sartore’s camera lens goes inside.

After a few minutes, the animal returns to its enclosure.

Having photographed more than half of the animal species in captivity, Sartore says it will take 10 to 15 years to wrap up the Photo Ark project. He hopes people will continue to be inspired by his portraits and take action to protect species at risk.

A US Federally Endangered Florida Panther at the Lowry Park Zoo in Tampa. (© Joel Sartore/National Geographic Photo Ark)

“If we think we can drive half of all species to extinction in the next 50, 60 years, but people will be fine, it won’t work that way. It just won’t work,” did he declare.

Sartore will talk more about his experience building the Photo Ark at the Jack Singer Concert Hall in Calgary on February 6-7. The event is sold out, but people can join the waitlist here.


With files from The Homestretch

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Letter from the editor: why we sometimes publish graphic photographs https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/letter-from-the-editor-why-we-sometimes-publish-graphic-photographs/ Sun, 23 Jan 2022 17:22:00 +0000 https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/letter-from-the-editor-why-we-sometimes-publish-graphic-photographs/ Years ago, the editors of The Oregonian had a vigorous and moving debate about whether to post a photo showing the charred remains of American contractors hanging from a bridge west of Baghdad as Iraqis celebrated. We ended up publishing the gruesome photo, in which the victims were barely recognizable as human bodies. I sometimes […]]]>

Years ago, the editors of The Oregonian had a vigorous and moving debate about whether to post a photo showing the charred remains of American contractors hanging from a bridge west of Baghdad as Iraqis celebrated.

We ended up publishing the gruesome photo, in which the victims were barely recognizable as human bodies.

I sometimes used this photograph to train other journalists in ethical decision-making. Photographs are good topics for these discussions because the debate usually starts quite simply: would you post the photo or not?

The advent of digital journalism gives newsrooms unlimited space for additional photos, rather than the traditional one or two in print, and enables video. Decisions about visual journalism multiply with the options.

I thought about this issue recently when I received a complaint from a reader about a photo we posted on OregonLive after a police shooting.

It was the photograph that aroused the concern of readers. Editors and the photographer discussed the photograph before it was published as it includes a glimpse of the man’s body after he was killed by police. Dave Killen / The Oregonian

“It is absolutely appalling that you are posting an image of the suspect lying dead on the road without any blurring,” the reader said. “He may have been wrong, but no human deserves to have an image of their dead body on the street shared for the whole world to see.”

Were we right to publish the photo? I think so, but it’s a decision that reasonable people can disagree on.

The question of whether to publish is actually only the first question. Publishers may choose other means to mitigate the effect of offensive images or graphics. In the case of Iraq, we published the photograph on an inside page, rather than on the front page. It ran in black and white, rather than color. And we’ve printed an editor’s note in the caption explaining our decision.

Selective editing or cropping of photos is a remedy in some situations. On websites, you can also warn readers and make them click affirmatively on graphical content.

Of course, many of history’s most striking and memorable photographs should be seen widely. The photos changed public opinion on important issues and opened eyes to the brutality.

When you have a journalistic purpose for such images, publication is at the heart of our information mission to reveal the truth. Think about the photo of a young woman kneeling in anguish next to a dead protester at Kent State University in 1970, or Nick Ut’s photo of a Vietnamese girl hit by napalm in 1972.

Many of us have seen the video of George Floyd dying slowly and excruciatingly on the sidewalk under the weight of a police officer. For some, it’s too hard to watch.

Through cell phones, police body cameras, home security systems and other recordings, we have all been exposed to so many more graphic images of death and violence. I think our tolerance has changed over time, and that’s not necessarily a good thing.

Several years ago, when I was talking about the photo of the bridge, a student journalist challenged my thinking. I would definitely post this photo, she said. Our generation can find any image with a click. Journalists no longer decide on our behalf.

Despite the veracity of the statement of the university reporter – yes, we are now being bombarded with deadly filmed shootings – we still take these issues seriously.

We might wonder if the media value of the image outweighs any potential harm. What is our journalistic objective in publishing the image? Can we explain the purpose to the readers? If we publish, can we mitigate any possible harm, perhaps with a warning label?

In the event that the reader has objected, I have deemed publication appropriate. The fatal shooting by a police officer on Interstate 5 was an important local story and a very public event. The photograph that showed the man’s body was at the back of the gallery, not the main image or highlighted in any way, and was at a distance.

Dave Killen, the veteran multimedia reporter who took the freeway photo, said those questions were on his mind at the scene. “I tried several different things…framing so that only the feet were showing, focusing on the highway divider instead of the body to keep the man in focus, and of course taking a lot of images that didn’t include the body at all,” he said. “I was also in a real-time chat with editors while I was still on location.”

From experience, we know that readers react more emotionally to victims close to home than to victims far away. We also know that showing faces, blood and other close-up details is more disturbing to readers than a distant shot of a body under a blanket.

“Unfortunately, this isn’t the first time I’ve photographed a corpse, and I’m sure it won’t be the last,” Killen said, “so the question of what we’ll be comfortable with use is still relevant in the back of my mind.

What do you think? Are newsrooms too wary of such footage, given the proliferation of dash cams and cellphone video? Does protecting society from violent images do more harm than good?

I appreciate the thoughtful conversations I have with many of you on these and other important journalistic issues.

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Travel the world with Steve Cozad’s photographs at the Solano Downtown Gallery https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/travel-the-world-with-steve-cozads-photographs-at-the-solano-downtown-gallery/ Sun, 09 Jan 2022 13:37:00 +0000 https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/travel-the-world-with-steve-cozads-photographs-at-the-solano-downtown-gallery/ Photographer Steve Cozad is featured in front of some of his work from Iceland. (Robinson Kuntz / Daily Republic) FAIRFIELD – Local artists have found a myriad of ways to express “Sea, Winds, Storms and Fog”, opening Wednesday at the downtown Solano gallery. Retired Construction Manager and 28-year Fairfield resident Steve Cozad employs photography. Five […]]]>


FAIRFIELD – Local artists have found a myriad of ways to express “Sea, Winds, Storms and Fog”, opening Wednesday at the downtown Solano gallery.

Retired Construction Manager and 28-year Fairfield resident Steve Cozad employs photography.

Five years ago, when he retired, he and his wife, Angie Cozad, began their journey in the world in earnest. The couple spent time in Iceland last year. Next year the destination is Antarctica.

Cozad’s parents worked in the airline industry, but the family did not travel much, he said.

Steve and Angie Cozad took their sons on trips to national parks and a few international trips like Costa Rica and Egypt. It was this last trip that gave young men the travel bug.

Both are now involved in creative art, photography and special effects.

Now, with empty nests, the couple can define their own travel times.

The couple were in Chile in March 2020 and “barely pulled out the last plane” as Covid-19 hit the world.

“We got back to the United States before everything was closed,” he said, adding that they had been following the news of Covid-19 and were able to complete the trip.

Cozad estimated he was around 20 when he bought his first camera.

“I’ve always loved taking pictures,” he says. “It was more of a documentary thing.”

He turned slides most of the time. After they were developed, he would go through them and digitize the images he liked.

“They weren’t really of good quality,” he said.

But they told the story.

Cozad went digital in 2007. At the same time, he devoted himself more to photography.

“The digital age has opened a lot,” he said. “It allowed me to add an artistic side.

Cozad learned from YouTube videos and signed up for webinars in Lightroom.

He recently started printing his own photos. He also found a great system to narrow down his choices. The decision is not taken in haste.

“Some that I’m starting to recognize better than others,” he said, protesting with a black and white photo of Venice, Italy, in 2016.

His exhibition at the Solano city center gallery is made up entirely of black and white photos. The idea surfaced when he was at the Sacramento Arts Festival in the fall and received several compliments for his only black and white video wall.

Cozad estimates that he has between 30,000 and 35,000 digital images.

“It’s fun to go back and find the little gems that I haven’t seen before,” he said.

Cozad joined the Fairfield-Suisun City Visual Arts Association in 2018 and has been in almost every show since. He won first place in black and white photography and a third place in color photography in the recent jury art exhibition.

His photography has been influenced by professional photographers such as Galen Rowell, Sebastião Salgado, Michael Frye and of course, some of the greats like Ansel Adams, Edward Westin and Imogen Cunningham.

“Sea, Wind, Storms and Fog” runs through February 26 and features photographs; glass and acrylic work; oil paintings and watercolors; and mixed media, collage, woodcarvings, digital art and ceramics.

Gallery guests are encouraged to vote for the People’s Choice Award.

“Sea, wind, storms and fog”

• From Wednesday to February 26
• Downtown Solano Gallery, 1350 Travis Blvd., Fairfield
• 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. from Wednesday to Sunday
• www.fvaa-arts.org
• 707-688-8889


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