Workshop – David Hemmings Bird Photography http://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/ Thu, 23 Jun 2022 05:37:50 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-2021-06-25T155134.587.png Workshop – David Hemmings Bird Photography http://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/ 32 32 Second Community Workshop Held for the East Hardy and Hall Avenue Corridor Project https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/second-community-workshop-held-for-the-east-hardy-and-hall-avenue-corridor-project/ Thu, 23 Jun 2022 03:34:00 +0000 https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/second-community-workshop-held-for-the-east-hardy-and-hall-avenue-corridor-project/ HATTIESBURG, Miss. (WDAM) – Residents, business owners and community leaders gathered at the Jackie Dole Sherill Community Center this afternoon for the second meeting regarding the East Hardy Street and Hall Avenue Corridor Project. While the first meeting focused on the details of the project, tonight’s meeting focused on the community and allowed community members […]]]>

HATTIESBURG, Miss. (WDAM) – Residents, business owners and community leaders gathered at the Jackie Dole Sherill Community Center this afternoon for the second meeting regarding the East Hardy Street and Hall Avenue Corridor Project.

While the first meeting focused on the details of the project, tonight’s meeting focused on the community and allowed community members to voice their opinions.

“This meeting is going to be a little more interactive,” planning division director Ginger Lowrey said. “We want to get more information from them. What specific things are they looking for. What are some uses that are inappropriate or inappropriate in their minds. What developments do they want to see and then get information about the cultural resources in the area so that we can highlight those as well. »

Attendees were able to talk to other residents about their thoughts in breakout sessions. Then, they were able to relay their concerns to the project leaders.

Owner and resident Michael McCullum said he came to hear the city’s goals for the project.

“I think there’s a lot more strength in diversity,” McCullum said. “We have a lot of neighborhood associations that want to keep things exactly the way they were, and that’s good to preserve the integrity of the neighborhood, but we have to realize that there’s a lot more strength to branching out and to be able to put more people inside our communities to have a different mix of people and also to be able to have more services for those people.

Other concerns expressed include traffic, housing needs, flooding and a desire to ensure the existing community is not forgotten while focusing on potential future residents.

Residents who missed the meeting can still raise concerns by emailing planning@hattiesburgms.com.

Copyright 2022 WDAM. All rights reserved.

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Senior Shop Mechanic – BikeBiz https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/senior-shop-mechanic-bikebiz/ Tue, 21 Jun 2022 08:37:54 +0000 https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/senior-shop-mechanic-bikebiz/ Richard Setter 06/21/2022 job description Clapham Cycle is a cycle shop, born out of a cycling club with an active community of enthusiasts. We are looking for an experienced Senior Shop Mechanic to join our friendly, ambitious and talented team. […]]]>





job description

Clapham Cycle is a cycle shop, born out of a cycling club with an active community of enthusiasts.

We are looking for an experienced Senior Shop Mechanic to join our friendly, ambitious and talented team.

Our store opened in May last year and we already have an excellent reputation in the area. Due to our success, we are looking to expand our team, making this a great opportunity to join us at a key milestone and help shape the business.

The ideal candidate is someone with ambition who wants to develop their skills and share their knowledge.

The main responsibilities of this role include:

  • Repair and maintenance of customer bicycles
  • Sale of new bikes and accessories
  • Lead our existing team of mechanics

Unique Professional Benefits

  • Until Total package of £32,000 (depending on experience)
  • Accredited training and development plan
  • Future Store Management Opportunities
  • 28 days of vacation including public holidays
  • The ability to work on your own bike and receive commercial pricing on all bike parts and accessories.
  • Team building experiences throughout the year.
  • Free membership to our cycling club

If you think this sounds appealing please contact us, we are currently interviewing for someone to start as soon as possible.

Thanks

Clapham cycling team





In other news…



The cost of living crisis has affected everyone in one way or another lately…

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Child Care Providers Participate in Executive Functioning Skills Workshop | New https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/child-care-providers-participate-in-executive-functioning-skills-workshop-new/ Sun, 19 Jun 2022 16:00:00 +0000 https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/child-care-providers-participate-in-executive-functioning-skills-workshop-new/ On June 11, 2022, fifteen childcare providers from different programs across Saipan participated in a two-hour workshop on Executive Functioning Skills: Methods for Improving Them in Children through Interactions and Relationships. The workshop was led by Evergreen Learning coach Russelle Mae Ignacio and facilitated at the Evergreen Learning office in Chalan Kanoa, Saipan. One of […]]]>

On June 11, 2022, fifteen childcare providers from different programs across Saipan participated in a two-hour workshop on Executive Functioning Skills: Methods for Improving Them in Children through Interactions and Relationships.

The workshop was led by Evergreen Learning coach Russelle Mae Ignacio and facilitated at the Evergreen Learning office in Chalan Kanoa, Saipan.

One of the objectives of this workshop was to provide an introduction to the seven essential life skills:

Competency 1 – Concentration and self-control

Competency 2 – Taking perspective

Competency 3 – Communicate

Competency 4 – Make Connections

Skill 5 – Critical Thinking

Competency 6 – Meeting Challenges

Competency 7 – Autonomous and engaged learning

Additionally, participants learned how, as adults, they can develop these skills through responsive and meaningful interaction and daily activities with the children in their care.

Finally, participants committed to creating a list of appropriate activities that will encourage children to use their executive functioning skills.

Executive functional skills include children’s ability to control their actions, thoughts, emotions, and responses to achieve their goals.

Participants were able to fully grasp the definition and how they can incorporate these practices into their daily routines and interactions with children by providing a variety of related activities.

The host played clips to show examples of how providers can help children’s brain development in their early years, as well as “serve and return interaction.”

The serve and return interaction is used to foster many back and forth interactions between child and adult.

The main source for this workshop was the book “Mind in The Making” by Ellen Galinsky. This two-hour workshop will count towards the number of annual training hours required by each provider’s Child Care and Development Fund Program.

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Fantastic Turnout for Sebastian City’s First Annexation Workshop – Sebastian Daily https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/fantastic-turnout-for-sebastian-citys-first-annexation-workshop-sebastian-daily/ Fri, 17 Jun 2022 16:45:36 +0000 https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/fantastic-turnout-for-sebastian-citys-first-annexation-workshop-sebastian-daily/ Sebastian City Annexation Workshop The first workshop was on Thursday at 5:30 p.m., but many locals showed up 15 minutes earlier to gather information about Sebastian’s annexation. A second workshop is scheduled for Thursday June 30, 2022, at 11:30 a.m. inside the hemicycle. The city of Sebastian was well prepared for this workshop with maps […]]]>
Sebastian City Annexation Workshop

The first workshop was on Thursday at 5:30 p.m., but many locals showed up 15 minutes earlier to gather information about Sebastian’s annexation. A second workshop is scheduled for Thursday June 30, 2022, at 11:30 a.m. inside the hemicycle.

The city of Sebastian was well prepared for this workshop with maps on display and plenty of information for citizens to read. Many staff and board members were also available to answer questions.

Jeff Bass of Graves Brothers, the owner, was also on hand to answer questions from the public or county staff.

Vice Mayor Fred Jones and Council Members Ed Dodd, Chris Nunn and Bob McPartlan also attended.

Indian River County Commissioners Susan Adams, Joe Flescher, Joe Earman, Peter O’Bryan, County Administrator Jason Brown and County Attorney Dylan Reingold also attended.

“We must have the ability to provide jobs for growth and affordable housing for families. These are all things that we will be looking at as the property comes along. None of this is planned at this time,” City Manager Paul Carlisle said. Sebastian Daily.

Carlisle said the landowner is willing to work with the city and help ensure sustainability as the area develops, and it will be years before homes are built.

“We did a great job managing Sebastian; I think we will do a great job managing this property as well,” Carlisle said.

Carlisle encouraged everyone to ask the staff questions and said they would be addressed at the next workshop on June 30.

Lisa Frazier
Previous annexations with the city of Sebastian

Lisa Frazier, Director of Community Development, said much of the information presented at the workshop was provided to the city by the applicant (landowner).

“What we’re presenting here is basically a summary of what annexation is, when annexation has happened in the past, Florida’s statutes for voluntary annexation,” Frazier told attendees at the ‘workshop.

The article continues below…

Frazier said a voluntary annexation occurs when the owner comes to their home and requests that their land be incorporated into the city. The owner has chosen to have a “mixed land use”, which means commercial and residential in simple terms.

“That’s all we have today for this property, just the land use. We don’t have zoning, it will continue to be agriculture, we don’t have a development plan, so we can’t tell anyone what the future homes will be or anything of that nature,” said Fraizer.

Annexation skepticism

A couple who disagreed with annexation said they saw it happening “in the south” near Fort. Lauderdale. They claim that promises were made and not kept by their city or developer. Another person said she never “retired” and didn’t think Sebastian should grow up.

A few residents were skeptical about the reason for “such an annexation rush,” questioning the real motives of the landowner.

But while fewer people disagreed with annexation, most townspeople at the workshop say growth is inevitable and prefer the city to control development rather than the county. They also feel that we should rush to annex and build as there is a housing shortage in the area.

The same people from environmental groups who provided misinformation about annexation in 2019 were also present at the workshop.

The Pelican Island Audubon Society and Friends of San Sebastianboth are out-of-town nonprofits with offices provided by the county, still say the town of Sebastian should stay out of annexation.

An environmentalist has suggested the city buy out the entire property and turn it into a permanent wildlife sanctuary until someone asks, “How much money do you have?”

The owner has a few options if the property does not annex to Sebastian. First, he couldn’t do anything and allow the county to control and develop it, which would mean more outside residents using Sebastian’s roads, parks, and boat ramps without paying any tax to the town. Another option would be to allow Fellsmere to annex it since the property is on its border. Or, the landowner could create his own city, but the inhabitants would still use Sebastian’s resources.

But ultimately, the landowner wants Sebastian to control him, because they’ve been annexing land to the city for almost 100 years already. Most residents of Sebastian live on land already annexed to the city.

Since the workshop, the city is now holding two meetings with county staff to discuss utilities and general issues.


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Jazz Jubilee: The Stanford Jazz Workshop celebrates its 50th anniversary | New https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/jazz-jubilee-the-stanford-jazz-workshop-celebrates-its-50th-anniversary-new/ Thu, 16 Jun 2022 01:04:19 +0000 https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/jazz-jubilee-the-stanford-jazz-workshop-celebrates-its-50th-anniversary-new/ In 1972, when Jim Nadel was a recent graduate jamming with friends at the Stanford Community Coffee House, he had no idea he was founding an organization that would become a showcase for jazz legends, an incubator for future greats, and still going strong. half a century later. But this summer, the Stanford Jazz Workshop […]]]>

In 1972, when Jim Nadel was a recent graduate jamming with friends at the Stanford Community Coffee House, he had no idea he was founding an organization that would become a showcase for jazz legends, an incubator for future greats, and still going strong. half a century later. But this summer, the Stanford Jazz Workshop (SJW) celebrates its golden anniversary and celebrates with over 30 concerts hosted, as well as its beloved educational programs for youth and adults (with in-person and online offerings) .

“It seems to me that time has flown,” Nadel said in a recent interview. “All of a sudden it’s been 50 years. So much great music has happened.”

Nadel, a saxophonist, composer, arranger and educator who is still artistic director of SJW, had just graduated with a music degree from Stanford University when he made the fateful decision to book a room at the Tressider Student Union on Tuesday. evening, after his Monday jam sessions at the campus cafe (now known as CoHo). The plan was to provide a space where jazz-loving friends could discuss the music they had played and heard the night before.

“This idea of ​​a jam session and then another session to exchange ideas and information, it became the basis of what moved forward,” recalls Nadel. “It really touched the musicians, and the musicians really appreciated it.”

And for the first 10 years or so, he said, that was the basic workshop format, with jams and discussion sessions focusing on the local community. As this community grew stronger and continued to work together, “it kind of grew into a program of useful information to share,” he said.

In 1982, “we reached another level”. It was then that Nadel invited saxophone master Stan Getz to join the workshop for the summer, and the SJW became a residential program, with members meeting daily for a week or two.

“Every year in the 1980s we doubled in size because we heard something special was going on,” he said. “People came from all over the world to be part of it.”

Some of the jazz legends who participated, Nadel remembers fondly, include bassist Ray Brown and iconic trumpeter Dizzy Gillespie, both of whom have participated in SJW on several occasions. Another treasured memory is the 1994 reunion of saxophonist Joe Henderson and pianist Horace Silver, who hadn’t seen each other in over a decade.

“This community stuff resonates with me personally,” Nadel said. “It was a great experience to be part of.”

Although performance has always been an important element since the early days of the jam, Nadel said it wasn’t until the late 1980s or early 1990s that the SJW concert series began to be called the Stanford Jazz Festival.

“The educational program and the festival were inextricably linked. The festival evolved very naturally, but at some point we noticed, ‘Hey, we have 24 straight nights of jazz here,'” he recalls. musical combinations never heard before, and some of the greatest players in the world.”

One of the characteristics of SJW is the organization of events that bring together artists from the workshop in unique couples.

“I liked bringing in people who worked really well together or contrasted in really interesting ways,” he said, including a diversity of styles so that “all different approaches to jazz were represented.”

For Nadel, one of the things that makes jazz so special is its emphasis on improvisation and interaction. “Players get into these really subtle, engaging musical conversations,” he said. “There’s a looseness and a connectedness. Everyone supports each other.” So it only makes sense that from its humble beginnings to its current, highly publicized incarnation, SJW — in both its educational and performance programs — has always been rooted in that sense of joyful collaboration.

Because the core of SJW’s mission is to teach and foster a love of jazz, one of the most rewarding and inspiring aspects of SJW is the return of former students as teachers and performers, a he declared.

“There are quite a few jazz players making an impact on the scene today who came through the Stanford Jazz Workshop when they were teenagers,” he said, naming the Grammy-winning pianist Taylor Eigsti and saxophonist Joshua Redman — who is now on the faculty of SJW and Stanford University — as examples of musicians who first came to the program as students.

“Watching their careers evolve and hearing them do new and exciting things for decades is great memories,” he said.

This year’s slate of Stanford Jazz Festival performances looks likely to yield many more fond memories, with concerts from June 17 to July 30 at multiple venues on campus, including the Bing Concert Hall, Dinkelspiel Auditorium and the Frost amphitheater. Highlights include pianist/singer Eliane Elias and her quartet on June 18; “Indian Jazz Journey”, with singer Mahesh Kale and saxophonist George Brooks on June 25; clarinetist Anat Cohen and horn player Wycliffe Gordon accompanied by the 50/50 Jazz Orchestra of SJW (the entire organization dedicated to equal gender representation) on July 9; singer Lisa Fischer alongside Taylor Eigsti, Ben Williams and Eric Harland on July 27; the beloved “All-Star Jam” on July 29; and the grand finale on July 30, when acclaimed singer Dianne Reeves will co-star with the SJW 50th Anniversary Band. This supergroup, made up of notable musicians who all dated SJW in their youth (Eigsti, Eric Harland, Ambrose Akinmusire, Redman, Justin Brown, Larry Grenadier, and Yosvany Terry), will reunite to celebrate SJW’s 50th anniversary and more. . Nadel himself will take the stage for his “Jazz Inside Out” introduction to the art form on June 17, as well as his popular family performance “Early Bird Jazz for Kids” on July 2.

With its large number of events, diversity of offerings, and unexpected collaborations and contrasts, Nadel said the festival likely has something for everyone, just like the genre itself.

Jazz, he said, is a broad umbrella covering a wide range of sounds and styles.

Traditional, progressive, Latin, Afro-Cuban, fusion and rock-influenced are just a few of the many styles of jazz that have been part of SJW over the years.

And for those who don’t yet consider themselves jazz fans, “I think it’s definitely worth exploring a bit, exposing yourself to different genres and figuring out what excites you,” he said. he declares. “There are real joys and it’s an exceptional and unique American art form.”

More information is available at stanfordjazz.org.

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Bernard A. Drew: The OL Dunton plane built in a North Adams workshop did not fly | Columnists https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/bernard-a-drew-the-ol-dunton-plane-built-in-a-north-adams-workshop-did-not-fly-columnists/ Tue, 14 Jun 2022 09:00:00 +0000 https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/bernard-a-drew-the-ol-dunton-plane-built-in-a-north-adams-workshop-did-not-fly-columnists/ This title is a teaser. The North Adams resident’s monoplane flew, but it didn’t land…a US Army contract. So he continued to manufacture his patented washing machines. Orravill L. Dunton (1859-1942), originally from Chelsea, came to North Berkshire from the Heywood-Wakefield Chair Co. in Gardner in 1901 to work for Arnold Print Works as an […]]]>

This title is a teaser. The North Adams resident’s monoplane flew, but it didn’t land…a US Army contract.

So he continued to manufacture his patented washing machines.

Orravill L. Dunton (1859-1942), originally from Chelsea, came to North Berkshire from the Heywood-Wakefield Chair Co. in Gardner in 1901 to work for Arnold Print Works as an engineer and master mechanic. It moved to Hoosac Cotton Mills and then to Hamer Improved Washer Co. in the stone mill on State Road near the Williamstown line. Here he proposed several mechanical improvements and filed patents.

The Hamer firm had organized in 1904 to manufacture the patented “Perfect Washer” developed by Harry R. Hamer (1857-1902) – it resembled the lower half of a large wooden barrel on legs, with a motorized agitator at inside.

By 1914 Dunton had a controlling interest in the business.

Besides clean laundry, Dunton was fascinated by the possibilities of theft.

“In early aviation, Mr. Dunton had extensive experience in designing and building aircraft,” the North Adams Transcript said. “He was recognized as exceptional in his field and his advice was often sought by those employed in the same field on difficult issues.”

He received U.S. Patent 1002908 on September 12, 1911 for an “aeroplane”. “The objects of the invention are to provide a more stable balance, to automatically adjust the planes in which each will bear its proper proportion of the weight, and to predict direction both vertically and horizontally…” he wrote.

Another patent – No. 1018413, issued February 27, 1912 – was for “a flying machine having oppositely arranged main support planes supported on axes at their inner ends to swing substantially in the plane of their support surfaces, by which the center of support the pressures may be moved fore or aft relative to the center of gravity of the machine…”, as reported in the March 9, 1912 issue of Aero. idea?

Dunton built his own single-seat monoplane in Hamer Improved Washer’s workshop. It was equipped to maintain automatic balance, The Transcript said in July 1916. “The airship which is practically ready for assembly has been built in the Hamer Company shop on State Street and it will be ready for a flight of “test within two weeks. A hangar has been prepared for this at the rear of the shop and the test flight will be carried out at the field east of State Street. It is planned to have the flight carried out by a experienced aviator and the exact date will be fixed in the next few days.

Aerial Age Weekly of September 4, 1916, anticipated the craft’s airworthiness trials: “The new aircraft embodies a number of new ideas for airship construction, among them a new shape of wings which are calculated to offer minimum air resistance when the ship is in flight.Their flight area is at least one-third larger than most aircraft and their shape and lines are entirely different.The tail is also built on new lines and is much longer than usual.The plane body is a little shorter than the usual length and also a little narrower.

Its six-cylinder engine was rated at 90 horsepower, with capacity expandable to 250 horsepower. It promised great speed and high lift capacity.

The city expected the plane to be manufactured locally.

Dunton was ready to ship his plane to Long Island for a test pilot to try out.

A year later, Dunton had yet to hear from Army officials if a military contract would be forthcoming. On May 24, 1917, the Transcript prematurely headlined an article: “Dunton to Make Planes for Army”.

He exhibited the prototype at the Hoosac Valley Fair in the fall of 1917. “Mr. Dunton said today there were many elements of danger in attempting a flight from the fairgrounds, but he was perfectly willing to put the machine at all risk. He is confident that the machine which is the result of 12 years of aircraft studies on his part will pull through with flying colors,” the Transcript said.

‘The Dunton plane was brought to the fairgrounds this afternoon and attracted a great deal of attention,’ the newspaper said, ‘as did the performances by the Tasmanian Girls and the singing of Madame Cara Sapin.’

World War I broke out.

No military contracts came – there was little time for experimentation.

While he waited for word, Dunton (and others at North Adams) experimented with “potato pens”, the deep planting of tuber seeds in late fall to produce potatoes the next season.

Dunton left the washer factory, which had reorganized but faced a competitive market.

In 1920 Dunton was a maintenance engineer for the Richmond-Wellington Hotel Co., responsible for its private power plant. During a severe shortage of municipal water, he devised a device to connect the buildings to the roof gutters of the Wellington Hotel to provide enough liquid for the steam plant. He retired in 1939, when the hotel switched to natural gas.

Dunton and his wife, the former Etta Eddy (1863-1960), lived at 77 Yale St. They celebrated their 60th wedding anniversary in 1942. They had one son and three daughters.

And a monoplane with unverified potential.

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NMC Cash for College Workshops This Week | New https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/nmc-cash-for-college-workshops-this-week-new/ Sun, 12 Jun 2022 16:00:00 +0000 https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/nmc-cash-for-college-workshops-this-week-new/ (NMC) — Northern Marianas College reminds interested students and community members of the upcoming Cash for College workshops taking place this week in Saipan and Tinian. The Saipan workshop will be held on Wednesday, June 15, 2022, starting at 9:30 a.m. at 4:30 p.m. at the As Terlaje campus of NMC. Registration will take place […]]]>

(NMC) — Northern Marianas College reminds interested students and community members of the upcoming Cash for College workshops taking place this week in Saipan and Tinian.

The Saipan workshop will be held on Wednesday, June 15, 2022, starting at 9:30 a.m. at 4:30 p.m. at the As Terlaje campus of NMC. Registration will take place at the Mango Terrace, located next to the NMC Olympio T. Borja Library.

The Tinian Workshop will also take place on Wednesday, June 15, 2022. The event will take place from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. in Room D of NMC’s Tinian Campus.

Participants will receive personal, step-by-step assistance in completing college financial aid forms, focusing on applying for free federal student aid, CNMI scholarship, college financial aid Saipan, Tinian Municipal Stock Exchange, Rota Municipal Stock Exchange and TEACH. To agree.

Workshop participants can also have their financial aid and other scholarship documents photocopied free of charge.

Staff members from the College Admissions and Records Office will also be present to provide information and assistance regarding the NMC application process.

Those who attend the workshop will be eligible for the NMC’s application fee and placement test fee waiver for the upcoming Fall 2022 semester – a savings of up to $75.

It is recommended that workshop participants bring valid ID, official high school transcript (at least three copies), copy of 2020 and 2021 1040, copy of 2020 and 2021 W-2 ( if no deposit), and proof of CNMI residence. Applicants for SHEFA must bring a valid US passport and voter registration card.

For more information, contact the NMC Financial Aid Office at 237-6792 or email fao@marianas.edu

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State Officials Hold Climate Workshop in Durango – The Durango Herald https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/state-officials-hold-climate-workshop-in-durango-the-durango-herald/ Fri, 10 Jun 2022 22:12:22 +0000 https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/state-officials-hold-climate-workshop-in-durango-the-durango-herald/ Community members share concerns and identify needs for action Jonathan Tyrrell of the Keystone Policy Center leads a breakout session on energy and transportation during the state’s climate change workshop Thursday at the Durango Community Recreation Center. State officials convened the workshop to hear from Durango and surrounding communities about their climate change concerns and […]]]>

Community members share concerns and identify needs for action

Jonathan Tyrrell of the Keystone Policy Center leads a breakout session on energy and transportation during the state’s climate change workshop Thursday at the Durango Community Recreation Center. State officials convened the workshop to hear from Durango and surrounding communities about their climate change concerns and priorities. (Aedan Hannon/Durango Herald)

As Colorado has sought to strengthen its response to climate change, the state has turned to local communities to hear their concerns and solutions.

State officials met with local government officials, Durango area organizations and the public Thursday for a climate change workshop at the Durango Community Recreation Center. The workshop provided a forum for community members to detail the effects of climate change on their lives, share ideas for local and regional action, and identify needed state support.

With the workshop, one of many across Colorado, the state aims to refine its climate policies and programs to better meet the needs of Colorado communities.

“We know what the key policy drivers are and some of the possible strategies, but how those are implemented in a more nuanced way, you can’t do that without hearing from the communities,” said Lauren McDonell, outreach planner at the climate change in the Department of Colorado. Public Health and Environment and one of the workshop facilitators, in an interview.

Facilitators from the Keystone Policy Center led the meeting in which officials from a range of state agencies, including the Colorado Department of Agriculture, Department of Transportation and Bureau of Energy, listened to and engaged community members and representatives from La Plata County, the City of Durango, San Juan Basin Public Health, and local organizations like the Four Corners Office for Resource Efficiency.

In one activity, workshop participants were asked to write down how they have been affected by climate change, by posting sticky notes on poster paper. Many sticky notes identified wildfires, drought and anxiety about a climate-altered future, concerns that were shared in the breakout sessions.

State officials held a climate change workshop Thursday at the Durango Community Recreation Center as they solicited statewide contributions after the state released its roadmap for reduction of greenhouse gas pollution in January 2021. (Aedan Hannon/Durango Herald)

“The only time I thought about leaving that area was during the 416 fire because of the smoke,” said Gail Harriss. “…I’m totally stressed thinking about when the next fire is going to break out.”

For most of the meeting, the approximately 45 people who attended the workshop split into two sub-groups. In one they discussed the intersection of agriculture, water and public health, and in the other transport and energy.

Participants in the agriculture and water session called for additional forums and greater collaboration with farmers and pastoralists to address water conservation.

Brian Devine, director of environmental health for San Juan Basin Public Health, said it’s time for communities in southwestern Colorado to recognize a future with less water and take steps to mitigate the impacts. .

Others weighed the wise use of water. Marty Pool, sustainability program manager for the city of Durango, called for a hierarchy of water use “where we recognize the nuance” between different uses of water.

Conversations about energy use and electrical infrastructure in the energy and climate session morphed into analyzes of affordable housing and the role that climate-friendly building codes and practices could play in fight against climate change and housing.

In both cases, participants identified ways in which the state could help Durango and other communities in the region respond to climate change. County Commissioner Marsha Porter-Norton called for more communication from the state about how it plans to address water issues. Laurie Dickson, executive director of 4CORE, a local energy efficiency nonprofit, said the state needs to help communities and utilities streamline rate structures for electric vehicle fast-charging infrastructure.

Variable charging station designs and fast-charging rates are a barrier to the expansion of electric vehicles, Dickson said.

Scott Baker requested more outreach from the Department of Agriculture to inform landowners of the agency’s incentive programs.

Throughout the workshop, those involved shared their appreciation of the forum and spoke of the need for sustained engagement between the state and local communities on climate change. They called for additional workshops, which state officials said they planned to provide.

La Plata County Commissioners Matt Salka and Marsha Porter-Norton speak to attendees of the state’s climate change workshop Thursday at the Durango Community Recreation Center. Attendees expressed concerns about wildfires and drought and called for greater collaboration to address climate change locally and throughout Colorado. (Aedan Hannon/Durango Herald)

“Opportunities to share like this help alleviate some of the stress we all feel,” Baker said.

Thursday’s workshop was the last of seven held in the state. CDPHE and other state agencies also held in-person workshops in Aurora, Greeley, Pueblo, Trinidad, Lamar and Delta as they meet with communities for the first time since the state introduced its scorecard. road for reducing greenhouse gas pollution.

In January 2021, the state released the roadmap that provides a framework for meeting its greenhouse gas emissions goals. A 2019 climate change bill passed by the Colorado legislature set greenhouse gas reduction targets of 26% by 2025, 50% by 2030 and 90% by 2050.

As Colorado increasingly implements policies and regulations to address climate change, including steps to phase out coal-fired power plants and expand the adoption of electric vehicles, the workshops aim to help state agencies to guide their efforts.

“There’s a lot going on in the state in terms of funding and climate programs and policies, and different things going through the Legislature,” McDonell said. “We know that every community is unique and that we cannot anticipate the unique challenges and opportunities that exist in all parts of the state. We’re in listening mode, just wanting to hear (from) people what their top concerns are, what their priorities are, (and) what they want to make sure to be on our radars.

Each session was different as Colorado’s diverse communities highlighted their concerns and the action they want to see from the state. However, affordable housing and its intersection with climate change came up in every workshop, McDonell said.

For state agencies, the workshops provided an opportunity to hear how rural communities in Colorado are responding to climate change and how policies and programs made on the Front Range affect other parts of the state.

“We heard about rural Colorado in a way that I don’t think many of us do very often,” McDonell said. “It’s been incredibly eye-opening and inspiring because so many people really care about this issue from different angles and also care about the impacts of some of the policies and programs that we are implementing.”

The state will host two virtual workshops later this month. Input from all workshops will be compiled into a Keystone Policy Center report, which will then be distributed to state agencies working to implement the greenhouse gas roadmap, as well as to the office of the governor and local governments.

The report will then inform regulations, funding programs and other decisions state agencies will make as they seek to address climate change, McDonell said.

“We get exactly what I hoped we would get out of it,” she said.

ahannon@durangoherald.com

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Creative Outpost Launches Outcome-Driven Workshops, Focusing on Programs That Lead to Jobs in Content Creation https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/creative-outpost-launches-outcome-driven-workshops-focusing-on-programs-that-lead-to-jobs-in-content-creation/ Thu, 09 Jun 2022 09:04:44 +0000 https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/creative-outpost-launches-outcome-driven-workshops-focusing-on-programs-that-lead-to-jobs-in-content-creation/ Nathan Nirschl (L), Hannah Straney and filmmaker Adam Muro discuss filming their as yet untitled work. The project was supported by The Creative Outpost, Inc. Little Falls, NY – The Creative Outpost, Inc., a 501C3 nonprofit organization in upstate New York, today announced the launch of its workforce development initiative to combat regional unemployment among […]]]>

Nathan Nirschl (L), Hannah Straney and filmmaker Adam Muro discuss filming their as yet untitled work. The project was supported by The Creative Outpost, Inc.

Little Falls, NY – The Creative Outpost, Inc., a 501C3 nonprofit organization in upstate New York, today announced the launch of its workforce development initiative to combat regional unemployment among young people and adults in career transition.

According to David E. Warner, Founder and President of Creative Outpost, “The organization was inspired by a handful of industry professionals with first-hand knowledge of the opportunities and skills required for content creation and post-production jobs. high-demand production. According to Warner, there is growing interest in film, video production and content creation in upstate New York locations such as Albany, Syracuse, the Adirondacks and even in Warner’s hometown. , Little Falls. This was the catalyst for his vision to create a post-production ecosystem of skilled talent trained by industry leaders working in film, video, podcasting, journalism and media.

The US Bureau of Labor Statistics shows a 21% increase in job prospects from 2020 to 2030 in content development industries, or 28,600 new jobs. This is much faster than the average for all professions. While a degree is always a plus, there are plenty of non-degree positions available as well.

Approximately 18,000 openings for broadcast, sound and video technicians are screened each year. The 2021 national median wage was $23.58 per hour or $49,050/year. New York is one of the highest jobs for audio and video technicians with 4,910 jobs (second only to California at 8,930) with an hourly wage of $31.16 or $64,800 (higher than California at 30 .24$/hr or $62,890).

Kayla Farrish and her film crew spent seven days in Little Falls filming parts of a movie called “Martyr’s Fiction.” The Creative Outpost coordinated student participation in the project, access to the Vincent Building, and community presentation at the Rock City Center.

Warner expects the first rollout of the workshop series to begin in July this year, focusing on photography, filmmaking and an introduction to cinema created using a smartphone. Instruction is hands-on, task-based, and delivered in-person by industry-leading professionals. Follow-up online course modules are also planned so that students can continue to build on their in-person workshops.

Creative Outpost’s goals are clear: to inspire individuals to consider a career in content development through technical knowledge and real job skills, to provide qualified interns to the film/video industries working in the North America region ‘State and create content development. hub in Little Falls that allows graduates to gain gainful employment locally without having to relocate to a major city or out of state.

For more information about Creative Outpost or to request notification for upcoming workshops, visit us online at www.creativeoutpost.org.

About Creative Outpost:
The Creative Outpost, Inc. is a 501C3 charitable organization that provides workforce development services in the form of job training, workshops, and internships to the general public to upskill workers in a changing economy and offers career paths to low-income youth with commerce. skills for employment locally and in the 45 minute shed of Little Falls, NY. The organization leverages its workforce services by fostering collaborative partnerships within the film, video, and media industries to facilitate internships and employment opportunities for its students.

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Sega and the Safety Box offer a game workshop https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/sega-and-the-safety-box-offer-a-game-workshop/ Tue, 07 Jun 2022 08:47:27 +0000 https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/sega-and-the-safety-box-offer-a-game-workshop/ The “INTRO to Gaming” workshop starts this week, a unique partnership between the cultural and ethnic ERG of SEGA® Europe, RISE and Safety Box® CIC. The workshop will welcome at-risk teenagers from Black, Asian and other minority groups, for a behind-the-scenes look at the video game industry. This will involve a coding workshop with Coding […]]]>

The “INTRO to Gaming” workshop starts this week, a unique partnership between the cultural and ethnic ERG of SEGA® Europe, RISE and Safety Box® CIC.

The workshop will welcome at-risk teenagers from Black, Asian and other minority groups, for a behind-the-scenes look at the video game industry.

This will involve a coding workshop with Coding Black Females, the largest network of black female developers in the UK, who have been commissioned to help create games in Scratch, and a discussion with members of the SEGA Europe team which highlights the range of career opportunities available in games.

Nathaniel Peat, founder of The Safety Box, said SEGA chose to work with his organization because of its proven track record of reaching out to disadvantaged young people, recognizing them as the ideal partner to help introduce a range of careers into the world. publishing and game development.

Peat enthuses: “We are so amazed about this partnership with SEGA Europe. For the young people we have worked with through the London VRU Stronger Futures programme, who are at risk of exclusion and CCE, this will open up new opportunities they never considered.

“In an ever-changing digital world, it’s so important that at-risk youth, especially Black, Asian and other minority girls, receive so much diversionary support to succeed.”

Peat added: “We are really excited to launch this with SEGA Europe, as it will help us to further protect young people, inspire them and awaken their creative potential!”

The Safety Box strives to find as many opportunities as possible to help young people towards a brighter future, and meaningful interactions with employers throughout a person’s education help highlight them.

“We’re really excited to be working with The Safety Box and Coding Black Females to deliver our first-ever introductory gaming workshop,” said Nicky Ormrod, General Counsel and CPO at SEGA Europe.

“We are truly optimistic that this day will open up avenues and potential opportunities for participants that they were previously unaware of.

“I hope this will be the first workshop in a long series, as we aim to reach young people as often as possible and hopefully inspire other game companies to do the same.”

YDB over ODB, NFT and more

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