Photography – David Hemmings Bird Photography http://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/ Thu, 23 Jun 2022 13:26:08 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-2021-06-25T155134.587.png Photography – David Hemmings Bird Photography http://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/ 32 32 Take Vacation Photos Like a Pro: Tips from Times-Picayune Cinematographer David Grunfeld | Entertainment/Life https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/take-vacation-photos-like-a-pro-tips-from-times-picayune-cinematographer-david-grunfeld-entertainment-life/ Thu, 23 Jun 2022 13:00:00 +0000 https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/take-vacation-photos-like-a-pro-tips-from-times-picayune-cinematographer-david-grunfeld-entertainment-life/ After two years of intermittent lockdown amid the COVID-19 pandemic, restrictions have eased and people are traveling again. In fact, with more and more people returning to work, the need to relax may be greater than ever. And with the holidays come photos, on social networks or simply to share with family. How do you […]]]>

After two years of intermittent lockdown amid the COVID-19 pandemic, restrictions have eased and people are traveling again. In fact, with more and more people returning to work, the need to relax may be greater than ever.

And with the holidays come photos, on social networks or simply to share with family. How do you make these vacation destinations and experiences as fabulous as you remember them?

We asked David Grunfeld, Times Picayune | New Orleans Advocate director of photography, for some tips.

First, have fun

The most important thing is to enjoy your vacation. Slow down instead of having an iPhone or Android camera in front of their face. Less is more.

First of all, the most important thing is to enjoy your vacation, he said.

“It’s really important for people to slow down and not take so many photos instead of having their iPhone or Android camera in front of their face,” Grunfeld said. “Less is more.”

But when taking meaningful and useful photos, Grunfeld encourages vacationers to think about composition and technique. To create vacation memories you’ll remember for years to come, pay attention to these five points.

  • find good light
  • Keep it clean and simple
  • Pay attention to the composition
  • Search people
  • To be curious





Spending time on Little York Lake celebrating the 4th of July with the Parker family, best friends from my hometown.




FIND THE RIGHT LIGHT

Whether you’re using an iPhone, Android or traditional DSLR, Grunfeld said to “follow the light” when taking vacation photos.

“Nice, quality light will enhance your vacation photos,” he said. “What I would like to share with my friends is, ‘Look how romantic this place is’…Your vacation photos should reflect what you’ve been through.”


Give us your best shot!  Submit your favorite vacation photo this summer, and we might publish it

Calling all holiday photographers!

He said to think about light that might appear differently than typical shadows or reflections. He suggested walking down a street at sunset or sunrise or thinking about how a place would look during a rainstorm, for example.

Grunfeld said light is the most powerful element any great vacation photo can have.

“Good quality light is your friend. Poor quality light is your enemy.”

KEEP IT CLEAN AND SIMPLE







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Laurel Springs North Carolina.




Grunfeld said as a little boy, he sat around a carousel spotlight with his family while his dad showed all his vacation photos for them to remember. After two photos, he recalls, he was bored.

The photographer compared the carousel spotlight to modern social media.

“How do you get people to thumb stop?” he considered. “How do you get people to stop scrolling to look at the pictures?”

The answer: Keep your photos clean and simple.

First, it’s important to check your background, he said.







David Grünfeld and Henny Youngman

“While I was a perpetual photography intern at Syracuse Newspapers while attending Syracuse University, I had the pleasure of taking a selfie with Henny Youngman at the New York State Fair in the early 1980. Team photographer Michael Okoniewski caught me in action,” says David Grunfeld, right.




“If you’re standing in front of the Eiffel Tower (for a selfie) and you say ‘I’m taking a picture in front of the Eiffel Tower’…you don’t want the Eiffel Tower to pop out of your head, like you’re combing your hair. Eiffel Tower,” he said.

The cinematographer also suggested that if holidaymakers choose to shoot video, it’s best done in short snippets.

“People are going to get bored after 15 seconds,” he said. “Pan around…Make it interesting.”

BE CAREFUL OF THE COMPOSITION







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Shelter Island Yacht Club.




It’s an old rule of thumb: divide your field of vision evenly into a nine-part grid: three vertical lines, three horizontal. Position the main elements of your photo along these lines. It’s much more interesting than placing the main image in the center of the field.

The smartphone is here to help, Grunfeld said. Activate the grid on your phone, then place the topics on the rows of a third. The slightly off-center composition keeps the viewer’s eye moving. This will make the photo more convincing, Grunfeld explained.

And Grunfeld said you can take the best vacation photos just with your phone. He encouraged people to familiarize themselves with the features of their phones’ camera apps. Light exposure can be adjusted, for example, which is a great way to enhance your snapshots.







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Early morning fishing on Little York Lake in Preble, New York.




Whether it’s a smartphone or a DSLR, “the best thing before you go on vacation is to understand how the camera works,” he said.

Grunfeld also suggested minimal photo editing. He said if you’re going to edit your photos, make sure you style them so people know it’s not real.

“The worst part is you’re watching something and you go there to eat it, and it’s awful, or you go to the waterfalls and there’s no water,” he said. -he declares. “If it’s a gray day and you’re in Paris, don’t turn the sky blue because you’ll look back and say ‘oh I remember that’.”

Above all, slow down to compose a photo.

SEARCH PEOPLE







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Meet Bill Cox, owner of Scipioville Garage in New York’s Cayuga County.




Grunfeld encourages vacationers to photograph people they meet along the way. In the case of nature, for example, he said people can create a scale to show the vastness of a place. He also argued that people look and act differently everywhere you go, and capturing people can help you remember your experience.

However, Grunfeld reminded travelers that the most important thing is to put down their cameras and enjoy the moment.

“Places are about people. People are not places,” he said.

TO BE CURIOUS







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Harry & Peg’s on Shelter Island, New York.




Overall, Grunfeld said the photos were about storytelling and curiosity.

He suggested vacationers try to photograph all the senses while on vacation. Sight, smell, hearing, taste and touch all need to be considered, he argued.

“And if you take a walk for five minutes? ” he said. “It’s all about curiosity, not just what’s in front of you, and then once you develop that curiosity and think outside the box, your photos will be different from everyone else’s.”







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Sam, Magill and Isaac Grunfeld at a Krispy Kreme in Brentwood, Tennessee.


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Eleventh Circuit forensic photography interns not eligible for FLSA salaries | Ogletree, Deakins, Nash, Smoak & Stewart, CP https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/eleventh-circuit-forensic-photography-interns-not-eligible-for-flsa-salaries-ogletree-deakins-nash-smoak-stewart-cp/ Tue, 21 Jun 2022 17:40:13 +0000 https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/eleventh-circuit-forensic-photography-interns-not-eligible-for-flsa-salaries-ogletree-deakins-nash-smoak-stewart-cp/ On June 9, 2022, a split panel of the United States Court of Appeals for the Eleventh Circuit ruled that an unpaid intern participating in a forensic photography training program was not entitled to pay. under the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA). In a 2-1 opinion, the Eleventh Circuit panel of McKay vs. Miami-Dade County […]]]>

On June 9, 2022, a split panel of the United States Court of Appeals for the Eleventh Circuit ruled that an unpaid intern participating in a forensic photography training program was not entitled to pay. under the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA). In a 2-1 opinion, the Eleventh Circuit panel of McKay vs. Miami-Dade County agreed that the intern photographer was an intern—not an employee—under the FLSA and that the county was not obligated to pay her as she was the primary beneficiary of her participation in the program.

Background

Brandi McKay is a college graduate who enrolled in Miami-Dade County’s free forensic imaging preceptorship program specifically to avoid the cost and time commitment of pursuing an additional college degree in forensic photography. The program lasted six months and required weekend work. The first two weeks of the program consisted of workbooks, followed by two weeks shadowing county staff photographers. For weeks five through eight, McKay worked in the morgue taking autopsy photos, “sometimes with staff supervision and sometimes without”. McKay left the program about a month before completing it. Prior to his departure, McKay spent the remaining weeks alternating between taking pictures at the morgue under little supervision and performing assignments at the program office.

McKay sued Miami-Dade County, seeking minimum wage and overtime pay under the FLSA, claiming she was an employee. The county advanced two primary defenses: (1) McKay was an intern under the internship exception established by United States Supreme Court and Eleventh Circuit case law and (2) she was a volunteer under the volunteering exception for public agencies found in § 203(4)(A) of the FLSA.

Eleventh Circuit Majority Opinion

The Eleventh Circuit majority first addressed the interplay between the internship exception, which is a court-created exception that can apply to all employers, and the statutory volunteer exception, which does not apply. than to public bodies. The court reviewed the legislative history and relevant case law and concluded that the statutory exception for volunteering did not replace the internship exception created by the court. In so finding, the court ruled that the internship and volunteer exceptions are available to public bodies.

The court then determined that McKay’s participation in the program met the statutory exception for volunteerism under the FLSA. Section 203(e)(4)(A) of the FLSA provides that a person is not an “employee” if the person: volunteers to provide services to a public body; does not receive a salary, but may receive expenses, reasonable benefits or nominal fees; and, renders services different from the services the person renders as an employee of the agency. The law does not define “volunteer,” but the United States Department of Labor has defined the term in regulations regarding the exception of volunteers, who the Eleventh Circuit has ruled are entitled to substantial deference. DOL regulations define a “volunteer” as follows:

A person who performs hours of service for a public body for civic, charitable or humanitarian reasons, without the promise, expectation or receipt of compensation for services rendered, is considered a volunteer during those hours.

Under this standard, the court held that McKay was not a volunteer within the meaning of the statutory exception because she and the county had stipulated that McKay “was not motivated in any way by civic, charitable or humanitarian”.

Finding the voluntary exception inapplicable, the court considered the trainee exception. Under this exception, a trainee learning with an employer is not considered an “employee” within the meaning of the FLSA if the trainee is the primary beneficiary of the trainee-employer relationship. The majority of the Eleventh Circuit applied the primary beneficiary test, considering the following seven non-exhaustive factors:

  1. “The extent to which the intern and the employer clearly understand that there is no expectation of compensation. Any promise of compensation, express or implied, suggests that the intern is an employee and vice versa.
  2. “The extent to which the internship provides training that would be similar to that which would be given in an educational environment, including clinical training and other practical training provided by educational institutions.”
  3. “The extent to which the internship is linked to the intern’s formal education program through integrated courses or the receipt of academic credits.”
  4. “The extent to which the internship adapts to the academic commitments of the intern by corresponding to the academic calendar. »
  5. “The extent to which the duration of the internship is limited to the period during which the internship provides the intern with beneficial learning.”
  6. “The extent to which the intern’s work complements, rather than replaces, the work of paid employees while providing significant educational benefits to the intern.”
  7. “The extent to which the intern and the employer understand that the internship is carried out without the right to gainful employment at the end of the internship.”

None of these factors is determinative, and not all factors “need to point in the same direction” for the court to decide that an intern is not an employee. Additionally, the court said it weighs and balances all circumstances, including those outside the seven listed factors if warranted.

The court found the facts in favor of applying the probationary exception with respect to the first two factors. Regarding the third and fourth factors, the majority concluded that not offering academic credit or professional certification or licensing did not preclude the county from using the internship exception. Instead, the majority pointed to McKay’s replacement of the internship for “another four years of study.” The majority concluded that the county’s program operated as a “free six-month vocational school in all but name.” Therefore, the majority concluded that the third and fourth factors were essentially inapplicable to the analysis.

With respect to the fifth factor, the majority ruled that the definitive six-month length of the internship weighed in favor of the county, particularly when compared to a four-year degree in this discipline.

With respect to the sixth factor, the majority, citing a previous Eleventh Circuit case, concluded that even if McKay’s work displaced the work of regular employees, “‘there is nothing inherently wrong with what an employer benefits from an internship that also clearly benefits the interns.” Accordingly, the majority gave this factor little weight. Finally, the Eleventh Circuit determined that the seventh factor weighed in favor of the county, as McKay did not expect a job in the county after his internship.

In a partially dissenting opinion, Judge Adelberto Jordan disagreed with the majority on factors three and four. He also rejected the majority’s application of the seven-factor test and advocated a more “holistic” totality of circumstances test that focuses on the “economic realities” of each particular case.

Key points to remember

This opinion illustrates that whether a learner/worker combination is an employee entitled to wages under the FLSA is a highly factual decision. Institutions of higher learning that sponsor internship programs and companies that provide learning experiences might consider focusing their attention on the facts and circumstances of each particular internship position when determining employee status. an individual, with the seven factors discussed in the majority opinion being guiding, in addition to other case-specific factors that indicate whether the primary beneficiary is the learner or the business.

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Legendary rock photographer Ed Caraeff talks about a lifetime of photos, cooking and travel https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/legendary-rock-photographer-ed-caraeff-talks-about-a-lifetime-of-photos-cooking-and-travel/ Sun, 19 Jun 2022 20:43:00 +0000 https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/legendary-rock-photographer-ed-caraeff-talks-about-a-lifetime-of-photos-cooking-and-travel/ Some of the most iconic photos in popular music history were taken by a man, who began photographing rock bands when he was just 15 years old. That man was Ed Caraeff, whose career not only spans decades of photography and art design for artists like Dolly Parton, Steely Dan and Elton John, but also […]]]>

Some of the most iconic photos in popular music history were taken by a man, who began photographing rock bands when he was just 15 years old. That man was Ed Caraeff, whose career not only spans decades of photography and art design for artists like Dolly Parton, Steely Dan and Elton John, but also a long career in the New York restaurant world. York.

After a serious health crisis in 2015, Caraeff sold the rights to his photography and embarked on a “to-do list” trip across the country in his motorhome, which he has been doing for almost seven years now. During a stop in San Luis Obispo last month, Caraeff came to the KCBX studio with a book called “Burning Desire: The Jimi Hendrix Experience through the Lens of Ed Caraeff.”

Jimi Hendrix’s Iconic Photo of Caraeff and His Legacy

“It was twice on Rolling Stone. [Publisher] Jann Wenner called me and said he was doing a number on the greatest rock shows of all time, and he narrowed his decision down to two photos, and he decided to use my photo of Jimi at the Monterey Theater burning his guitar. And I remember, I was already in the restaurant business at that time, but the first words that came out of my mouth were, ‘What’s the other one?'”

“And he also asked permission to color it in, instead of just doing it. Most people would have done it without telling me, but he asked permission to color it in using someone’s photo. ‘other as a guide to that night. I agreed, and it was used for the first time in color on the cover of Rolling Stone.”

Ed Caraeff

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Iconic pictures

Singer, songwriter and actress Dolly Parton poses for a portrait during the cover session for her album ‘Here You Come Again’ on July 7, 1977 in Los Angeles, California.

“He made sure to tell me that the cover wouldn’t have a lot of characters on it, like ‘Best College Fashion’. He said it would be really simple, and he was the one who made it famous, because that no one cared about this photo before that. Kodak gave me an award, saying it was the most famous rock photo ever taken – it was fun.

From photography to art direction to cooking

“It’s 1980, New York. I got my first suit other than a bar mitzvah suit, you know, I actually got a Ralph Lauren suit. I got a leather wallet, and my idea was to call the art directors of companies. If I admired their album covers, I would go to their art directors and show them my portfolio. And I called a record company, and when I had the phone call, they answered the phone and said, ‘Are you calling for the art director position??'”

“So I didn’t miss a beat, I said yes. Turns out they had an ad looking for an art director. So I just pulled some things out of my portfolio, put some d other things that were more art direction and I ended up spending five years as an art director and creative director in New York.”

“[After that] I answered an ad in the Sunday New York Times to be an executive chef near the United Nations, to open a Tex-Mex restaurant. I had a cooking audition, and I was offered the job and it was my first job. [as a chef].”

“I had no cooking skills. While in New York, I became a single mom with my two sons. And so we would go out to eat all the time. It’s easy to do if you’re in New York. , you know, they only ate a few dishes – pizzas, cheeseburgers, French toast. I realized after a week that I needed to do vegetables, maybe.”

“So I would go to a bookstore in New York and just stand in the back and look in the indexes to learn things. I wanted to learn how to bake a potato. So I was really curious as I was learning to cook. I just thought it was a form of expression. I think I’m an artist with pretty good business sense and I just followed my passion.”

“The thing with the kitchen is that I felt like with my photography, I had kind of been there, you know. I didn’t feel like going back to making music videos again , which you’d see was maybe a natural extension – but the opportunity to cook arose because I wanted to cook for my sons, and then I loved it and became passionate about it. “

“And I think of all the things I’ve learned in my life, being able to cook effortlessly and stress-free is the best thing I’ve ever done.”

Hendrix in Monterey

Ed Caraeff

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Iconic pictures

American guitarist Jimi Hendrix (1942 – 1970) sets fire to his Fender Stratocaster guitar while performing at the Monterey International Pop Music Festival, June 18, 1967 in Monterey, California.

Health alerts and to-do lists

“[The health scares] started when I had a toothache and ended up being seen by a cardiologist, and a year and a half after MRIs and tests they found an aneurysm growing in my aorta.”

“And there in the doctor’s office, as he was talking to me, I thought about my mortality. And I thought I had worked long enough at an early age – it was well over 50 regular job – I thought, ‘bucket list.’ This all happened in a split second, I thought “to do list”, and one thing immediately popped up like nothing else ever has. And that’s what I do , which I’ve been doing for seven years: I got rid of all my belongings and moved into an RV.”

“I don’t know, that’s how it is. You know, I’m usually looking for the next thing instead of dwelling on the past. I’m talking about Orcas Island in the Florida Keys in Woodstock in New York, in California desert, which I love. What I don’t do is I’d rather not fly or drive in Canada or Mexico anymore.

Caraeff’s connection to San Luis Obispo

“This is the place to find any part, any screw, any fabric [for the VW camper van]“My engine, my engine was built here at Westy Werks. It’s the place to be, that’s why I found San Luis Obispo, because of my vintage Volkswagen motorhome. there may be no other place outside of Germany that has all the parts available and people who know how to maintain them, not just mechanically, but all parts of the motorhome – the tent, the sink , the stove, my weird little needs, and it’s all done here in San Luis Obispo.”

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Courtesy of Iconic Images

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Ed Caraeff signs a poster of one of his famous images.

“You can go in any direction [here]. You can go south, you can go to Big Sur. You can go on the 101, you can go all kinds of different directions from here. Yeah, that’s nice.”

Start early, never sleep

“People were calling me for photography, and if I could do it, I would do it. Then I developed all this film and did all the prints myself, I didn’t send anything. I I was working all the time. When my family went to sleep, I’d make myself a cup of coffee and go down to the darkroom, where I had a great sound system and a good harmless light, you know, not just a red light bulb. Everything was comfortable for me, and I worked until four in the morning, all the time. I had a stable job for 14 years without a business card, without a wallet, without an agent, and my phone number. Wasn’t listed. But I got busy.

“I started this when I was in high school. I started this career, which I didn’t know was a work option and I was grateful for it, but it was a roller coaster. I had a very high standard I was very professional I was not a flake so I got the jobs I had to deliver the finished artwork ready to go for the printer I had to go to the printer to make sure what they were doing represented my art. I did all of that – I was a total control freak for 14 years.”

“I never went camping, I didn’t go to prom, I didn’t really date. I just worked – I was with artists, I was in the studio, I was I was in their private jets, I was in castles I mean, amazing things, but you know, I didn’t have that other experience, and I thought I’d miss it if I couldn’t not driving without a reservation and camping, which I had never done.”

“I once signed up to do a European tour with Three Dog Night and I had so many jobs to finish that I hadn’t slept in six nights. That’s probably why I have a brain aneurysm. the aorta – I was carrying the body down.”

Classical music, French radio and Bob Dylan

“If it wasn’t for the music, we wouldn’t be sitting here. I wouldn’t have been interested in photographing musicians and their weird looks. I’m a big fan of music and how it changes, and how art directs your life, from classical to Miles Davis.”

“I’m very influenced by a radio station in Paris, France called FIP – free public radio with no commercials, and they play the most eclectic selection of music. You never know what you’re going to hear next, they’ll from Van Morrison to a classic tune to something of a movie to an African beat. It’s really wild, and so I make a playlist of what I hear on French radio.

“I have all kinds of different playlists: early Rolling Stones, Cat Stevens, etc. I’m a big Big Bob Dylan fan, who I got to work with, which was a great pleasure for me.”

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A collection of some of Ed Caraeff’s photos over the years.

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Courtesy of Iconic Images

On rewards, recognition and imitators

“It’s a huge honor for me. Even if people just want to post it on their social media and rip it up, it’s still an honor. I feel flattered. I once walked the boardwalk at Venice Beach, and everyone’s selling their wares, I walk up and someone painted a picture of mine where Jimi is about to burn the guitar, and they made a big painting out of it.”

“My friend said it was a scam, you know, so I said, ‘You know, that’s flattery.’ I think it’s flattery, really – it was a really good painting. Someone just tattooed it, and it’s amazing. A tattoo artist in Monterey did their version of my photo, and I love it. I reached out and said “Bravo” because he’s really really doing his own thing. It’s a beautiful tattoo, it’s awesome.

This interview has been edited for clarity and length.

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Columbia wraps utility boxes in art from local photographers https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/columbia-wraps-utility-boxes-in-art-from-local-photographers/ Fri, 17 Jun 2022 23:48:00 +0000 https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/columbia-wraps-utility-boxes-in-art-from-local-photographers/ COLUMBIA, Tenn. (WTVF) – A town in central Tennessee is adding a bit of art in unexpected places. It’s all part of a sprucing up effort that requires a bit of out-of-the-box thinking. Capturing the uniqueness of his city is always a goal for photographer Ross Jaynes. “I’ve been taking photos of Columbia for a […]]]>

COLUMBIA, Tenn. (WTVF) – A town in central Tennessee is adding a bit of art in unexpected places. It’s all part of a sprucing up effort that requires a bit of out-of-the-box thinking.

Capturing the uniqueness of his city is always a goal for photographer Ross Jaynes.

“I’ve been taking photos of Columbia for a very long time, I’ve lived in Columbia most of my life,” he said.

His work is very linked to the city. Walk into City Hall, and there’s his work on the wall. Then there’s his photo gallery of the Columbia Courthouse.

“It looks like a postcard or something from a Norman Rockwell painting,” Ross said.

Ross is ready to do anything to make a special place even more special.

You know those big metal utility boxes you see around your town? Well, Columbia had an idea. Turn them into art.

“It’s a box that contains all the electrical stuff from what I can gather,” laughed Ross. “I could be completely wrong, but it’s here for utilitarian purposes. Now we’ve wrapped them up downtown with some photos.”

Four utility boxes near downtown Columbia are shrouded in photographs by Ross and fellow photographer Sarah B. Gilliam. Images show downtown Columbia, the Duck River area, a presidential seal and a field of flowers.

The artwork was created through a grant from the Tennessee Arts Commission with the Columbia Arts Council contributing the work of both photographers.

For Ross, it’s just a creative idea to make a place he loves even more unique.

“They’re there, and they’re giant eyesores,” Ross said of the unchanged utility boxes. “If we can spruce them up, I’m all for it! Let’s do it. Let’s make our town different from any other town in Tennessee.”

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The $15million Leica camera belonged to the man who democratized photography https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/the-15million-leica-camera-belonged-to-the-man-who-democratized-photography/ Thu, 16 Jun 2022 08:28:56 +0000 https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/the-15million-leica-camera-belonged-to-the-man-who-democratized-photography/ Vienna-based Leitz Photographic Auctions celebrated 20 years in business this week by selling the inventor of 35mm photography’s camera for €14,400,000 (US$15,147,360), breaking the previous world record for €2,400,000. Oskar Barnack was only 34 years old when he built, in 1913, what would later become the first commercially successful 35 mm camera, later called Ur-Leica […]]]>

Vienna-based Leitz Photographic Auctions celebrated 20 years in business this week by selling the inventor of 35mm photography’s camera for €14,400,000 (US$15,147,360), breaking the previous world record for €2,400,000.

Oskar Barnack was only 34 years old when he built, in 1913, what would later become the first commercially successful 35 mm camera, later called Ur-Leica for Ernst Leitz Optische Werke.

The world record price for a camera passed the $1 million mark in 2011, the $2 million mark in 2012, and nearly passed the $3 million mark in 2018. In 2022, this camera raised the bar beyond $15 million – an amazing result

Leica

Before the Leitz camera entered production in the mid-1920s, almost instantly making 35mm the new standard format for professional photographers, it is believed that around 20 examples of the O series were made. There are only a dozen originals left and when they come up for auction they invariably sell for over a million dollars. The most recent examples before that brought in $2,953,920 (serial number 122), $2,720,304 (serial number 116) and $1,890,108 (serial number 107).

From Oskar Barnack's description at his induction into the International Photographic Hall of Fame: "He is credited with making the very first 35mm camera.  Originally it was considered a camera

From the description by Oskar Barnack on the occasion of his induction into the International Photographic Hall of Fame: “He is credited with making the very first 35mm camera. Originally it was considered a ‘miniature’ camera, and with its high standards and revolutionary technology it was ‘the camera miniature par excellence”, according to historian Robert Hirsch He wrote, “not only was it smaller and lighter than other portable cameras, but it used inexpensive standard film stock, allowing a photographer to quickly make and discreetly 36 exposures without reloading. Interchangeable lenses faster, high definition and a -in coupled rangefinder tracking.'”

Leica

Barnack adapted 35mm motion picture film for use with a camera with a larger negative than other 35mm cameras of the time. The toothed film rolls holding the perforated film allowed for more precision than the typical paper-backed roll film.

Leitz Photographica (formerly WestLicht Photographica) is clearly the world's leading vintage camera auction house.  Links to all these cameras are available on NewAtlas.com

Leitz Photographica (formerly WestLicht Photographica) is clearly the world’s leading vintage camera auction house. Links to all these cameras are available on NewAtlas.com

NewAtlas.com

Its design was revolutionary because it carried film horizontally, allowing an expanded frame size to 24 x 36 mm with a 2:3 aspect ratio, instead of the 18 x 24 mm cameras which carried film vertically. Negatives of this small format could be enlarged to obtain sharper positive images. For this to be effective, the camera also needed a high quality lens capable of producing larger format film quality.

Many of the world’s greatest photographers have used the Leica, with names such as Henri Cartier-Bresson, Aleksander Rodchenko, Ilse Bing, Lee Miller, Robert Doisneau, Arthur Rothstein, Helmut Newton, Diane Arbus and Georgia O’Keeffe among the ranks , but certainly the most famous of them all at auction is Man Ray.

Statistically, American Man Ray is now the most valuable photographer in the world. and his work has now elevated him far above all others. He protested that the quality of the camera didn’t matter, but he used a Leica.

He set his first world record price for a photograph when his “No. 06 Rayograph” from “Champs Délicieux” sold for $126,500 in 1990.

Sold for $607,500 at Christie's New York on October 5, 1998, this print of "Black to White" (1926) by Man Ray, set a new world record for a photograph, raising the previous record of $398,500 set by an image by Alfred Stieglitz of his wife (Georgia O'Keeffe: A Portrait -- Hands and Thimble (1920)) by more than 50 percent.  The record will last only one year.

Sold for $607,500 at Christie’s New York on October 5, 1998, this print of “Noire at Blanche” (1926) by Man Ray sets a new world record for a photograph, raising the previous record of $398,500 set by an image of Alfred Stieglitz of his wife (Georgia O’Keeffe: A Portrait — Hands and Thimble (1920)) by more than 50%. The record will last only one year.

In 1993, ‘Glass Tears’ (1932) sold for $193,895 to give him a second world record, and in 1998, amid a worldwide copyright infringement scandal, ‘Black and White’ (1926 ) sold for $607,500 to give him his third world auction price record.

First photograph to sell for over a million dollars, Man Ray's "tears of glass" (1932) was sold to Pace McGill Gallery in New York (now Pace Gallery) in 1999.

The first photograph to sell for over US$1 million, Man Ray’s “Glass Tears” (1932) was sold at New York’s Pace McGill Gallery (now Pace Gallery) in 1999.

This award was remarkable in many ways, but most importantly because it was achieved in the months following international news of the greatest photograph counterfeiting scandal in history, and more specifically the massive falsification of the work of Man Ray.

On April 7, 1998, parisian daily The world broke news of a forgery ring that had produced dozens of Man Ray’s photographs, feeding them into the fine art market for two decades. Every valuable newspaper in the world followed the story, and it was slowly but surely smothered and obscured and even two decades later no one is quite sure what happened.

Some suggested reading on the subject: Intrigue in the World of Photography II: Man Ray’s Fake Prints and Adrian Darmon of ArtCult France also looks into the scandal.

Prints were produced from copies of the original negative plates, sometimes on photographic paper made as recently as the 1980s and 1990s, certificates of authenticity had been issued, sales had been made through dealers reputable and auction houses and the Man Ray scandal rocked art. world like no other before or since.

Many experts believe that ‘dozens’ of fake Man Ray photographs still hang in the world’s finest collections, museums and art galleries…and when the scandal broke, Man Ray set another world record .

“Glass Tears” became the first photograph to sell for over $1 million when San Francisco collector John A. Pritzker paid $1.3 million privately.

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SJMA presents a new exhibition by photographer Brett Weston taken from the permanent collection… https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/sjma-presents-a-new-exhibition-by-photographer-brett-weston-taken-from-the-permanent-collection/ Tue, 14 Jun 2022 17:33:56 +0000 https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/sjma-presents-a-new-exhibition-by-photographer-brett-weston-taken-from-the-permanent-collection/ Brett Weston, Mono Lake, California, 1966. Gelatin silver print, 11 x 14 inches. Gift from the Christian Keesee Collection, 2020.14.48.San Jose Art Museum Known for his bold, abstract compositions of Western American landscapes and natural forms, and for his bold print style, Brett Weston was one of the leading photographers of the early 20th century. […]]]>

Brett Weston, Mono Lake, California, 1966. Gelatin silver print, 11 x 14 inches. Gift from the Christian Keesee Collection, 2020.14.48.
San Jose Art Museum

Known for his bold, abstract compositions of Western American landscapes and natural forms, and for his bold print style, Brett Weston was one of the leading photographers of the early 20th century. From July 22, 2022 to January 22, 2023, the San José Museum of Art (SJMA) will present Brett Westonwith fifty photographs taken exclusively from the permanent collection of the San José Museum of Art.

The growth of the SJMA’s permanent photography collection has primarily benefited from the acquisition of in-depth works or unique portfolios by individual photographers. The acquisition of this collection represents the largest set of photographs by an artist to enter the Museum’s collection. In addition, the Museum is used to presenting innovative exhibitions by photographic artists such as This is Not a Selfie: Photographic Self-Portraits from the Audrey and Sydney Irmas Collection, David Levinthal: MAKE BELIEVEand Annie Leibovitz: Pilgrimageamong others.

Spanning approximately 40 years, from the 1930s to the 1970s, Brett Weston’s new exhibit will feature images of natural landscapes and seascapes near Big Sur and Carmel, California; the Oregon Coast; and White Sands, New Mexico; as well as three large portfolios: “Baja California”, “Abstraction I” and “Abstraction II”.

Brett Weston, Worm Tracks, California, 1937 (printed later). Gelatin silver print, 8 x 10 inches. Gift from the Christian Keesee Collection, 2020.14.29.
San Jose Art Museum

“Although Weston has traveled extensively around the world, he has spent much of his life in California. So it’s only fitting that we exhibit Weston’s work at SJMA,” said Rory Padeken, curator of the San José Museum of Art. “Throughout his career, Weston transformed close-ups of familiar subjects into the beautiful and mysterious abstractions that have become his signature. He had an acute ability to extract detail from the larger context and these carefully chosen subjects – twisted branches, tangled kelp, rock formations, cracked mud and knotted roots – have remained enduring motifs in his work.

“This group of photographs provides an overview of Weston’s practice over his nearly seventy-year career. This is an important addition to the Museum’s growing collection of photographs, and we were honored to have them offered to us by the Christian Keesee Collection. We are thrilled to be able to share them with our visitors,” said S. Sayre Batton, Executive Director of Oshman, San José Museum of Art.

The second son of famed photographer Edward Weston, Brett Weston has devoted his entire life to photography, experimenting with various printing processes and exploring a wide range of themes and contexts to create unique work that transcends comparison to the images of his famous dad. Although he recognized his father as a huge artistic influence and admired the work of other photographers, including Paul Strand, Charles Sheeler and Henri Cartier-Bresson, Weston was also greatly inspired by artists working in painting and sculpture. such as Georgia O’Keeffe (whom he once proclaimed as the greatest living American painter), Constantin Brâncuși and Henry Moore.

Weston made his first photographs in 1925 with his father’s second camera, a 3 ¼ x 4 ¼ inch Graflex. From the start, Weston saw beauty in detail, and images from this period reflect an intuitive and sophisticated approach to abstraction that would blossom later in his career when he began taking photographs with an 8 x 10 inches.

Brett Weston, Pebbles and Kelp, Point Lobos, CA, 1965. Gelatin silver print, 10 3/8 x 13 ¼ inches. Gift from the Christian Keesee Collection, 2020.14.13.
San Jose Art Museum

Weston’s photographs were donated to SJMA in 2020 from the Christian Keesee Collection, which contains Brett Weston’s archive and represents the most comprehensive body of the artist’s work in the world. Most of the photographs donated to SJMA are vintage prints, produced the same year as the shot, and a few were later printed by the artist.

ABOUT THE ARTIST

Born in 1911 in Los Angeles, Theodore Brett Weston was the second of four sons of Flora Chandler and famed photographer Edward Weston. At thirteen, Weston became his father’s apprentice and traveled with him to Mexico in 1925. Living in Mexico, he was surrounded by some of the revolutionary artists of the time, including Tina Modotti, Frida Kahlo, Diego Rivera, Jean Charlot and Jose. Clemente Orozco, and began photographing there with a small 3 ¼ x 4 ¼ inch Graflex camera given to him by his father. For most of his life, Weston resided primarily in Carmel, California, where the family had moved in 1929, and worked in Los Angeles, New York, South America, Europe, Japan, Alaska and in Hawaii. His photographs have been the subject of numerous exhibitions, publications and films, and are held in the collections of the Art Institute of Chicago; Carnegie Museum of Art, Pittsburgh; Center for Creative Photography, Tucson, Arizona; High Museum of Art, Atlanta; Honolulu Museum of Art; International Center of Photography, New York; J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles; Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York; The Museum of Modern Art, New York; National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C.; Philadelphia Museum of Art; Santa Barbara Museum of Art; San Francisco Museum of Modern Art; Smithsonian Museum of American Art, Washington, DC; and Whitney Museum of American Art, New York. Weston died in 1993 in Kona, Hawaii.

RELATED PROGRAMMING

Brett Weston Opening Celebration
Friday, July 22, 2022
Member Preview: 11:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. Community Opening Celebration: 6:00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m.

Celebrate the opening of Brett Weston. The galleries are open late with music from a local DJ. Members receive a commemorative button and other special benefits.

Free admission for members all day and for the public from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m.

Art 101: Striking Contrast Photography [onsite + online]
Friday August 26, 4-6 p.m.

Take incredible photos inspired by master photographer Brett Weston. Artist and instructor Emilio Banuelos shows you how to maximize your phone’s camera. Participants will need a smartphone with an integrated camera. Email education@sjmusart.org to reserve a tablet. Pre-registration required.

$15 ($10 for members). For more information and to register, visit sjmusart.org.

SUPPORT

Brett Weston is supported by the SJMA Exhibitions Fund.

The operations and programs of the San José Museum of Art are made possible through the generous support of the Museum’s Board of Trustees, a Cultural Affairs Grant from the City of San José, the Lipman Family Foundation, the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, the Richard A. Karp Charitable Foundation, Yvonne and Mike Nevens, The David and Lucile Packard Foundation, The Yellow Chair Foundation, the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation, the SJMA Director’s Council and Council of 100, the San José Museum of Art Endowment Fund established by the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation of the Silicon Valley Community Foundation and the William Randolph Hearst Foundation.

SAN JOSE ART MUSEUM

The San José Museum of Art (SJMA) is a museum of modern and contemporary art dedicated to inclusivity, new thinking, and visionary ideas. Founded in 1969 by artists and community leaders, its dynamic exhibitions, collection and programs resonate with the defining characteristics of San Jose and Silicon Valley, from its rich diversity to its innovative ethos. The Museum provides lifelong learning for school children and their educators, multi-generational families, creative adults, university students and professors, and community groups. SJMA is committed to being a museum without borders, essential to creative life in the diverse communities of San José and beyond.

SJMA is located at 110 South Market Street in downtown San Jose, California. The Museum is open from Friday to Sunday, from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. and until 9 p.m. on the first Friday of each month. Beginning July 1, SJMA hours of operation will extend to Thursdays, 4-9 p.m.; Friday 11am–9pm; Saturday to Sunday, 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. For up-to-date information on SJMA, visit SanJoseMuseumofArt.org. Admission is $10 for adults, $8 for seniors, and free for members, students, youth and children 17 and under, and teachers (with valid ID). Admission is free from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. on the first Friday of each month. For more information, call 408.271.6840 or visit SanJoseMuseumofArt.org.

Visitors 2 years and older must wear a mask. The SJMA will carefully and continuously monitor the effectiveness of these guidelines in real time and make further adjustments as necessary.

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Two buildings in Washington feature prominently in CIA photo intelligence work https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/two-buildings-in-washington-feature-prominently-in-cia-photo-intelligence-work/ Sun, 12 Jun 2022 19:00:00 +0000 https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/two-buildings-in-washington-feature-prominently-in-cia-photo-intelligence-work/ Placeholder while loading article actions For the past few weeks in this space, we’ve hung around the Steuart Building at Fifth and K NW streets, the top floors of which housed the CIA’s National Photographic Interpretation Center from 1956 to 1963. The place was buzzing in October 1962 when Soviet nuclear missiles were photographed in […]]]>
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For the past few weeks in this space, we’ve hung around the Steuart Building at Fifth and K NW streets, the top floors of which housed the CIA’s National Photographic Interpretation Center from 1956 to 1963. The place was buzzing in October 1962 when Soviet nuclear missiles were photographed in Cuba.

Even the best-kept secrets can be hard to keep. by Jim Allen dad, georgewas in the Steuart Building for a few years when he was part of a small Army Map Service contingent that worked there with the CIA.

Jim, from Fairfax Station, wrote: ‘He told me he once took a taxi there and when my father gave the address to the taxi driver, the taxi driver said, ‘Oh. You’re one of those CIA guys.

David Stinson said there was a CIA print shop on the top floor of the building, with print jobs laid out on pads.

“On our hot summer days in DC, the large, industrial-sized windows were kept open,” he wrote.

One day a huge summer storm hit. Papers flew out of the windows and fluttered to the ground below. Dave wrote: “The area was filled with government workers collecting the windblown documents!”

by Chris Hughes dad, John T. Hughesworked in the Steuart building, first as a photo interpreter for the Defense Intelligence Agency, then as a national security briefer.

Chris wrote: “Half our neighborhood in Annandale was working overtime in October 1962 – many of the neighbors were in the intelligence community. He didn’t say anything to my mom about why he couldn’t come home for those two weeks but said to fill the car with food and water and if anything happened take the kids and go west.

Once tensions have subsided, John F Kennedy wanted the nation to understand what had happened. Secretary of Defense Robert McNamara asked John Hughes to give a televised prime-time security briefing. (You can find it on YouTube.)

John had to sort through images, find the ones that weren’t classified. The visual aids were projected onto a 10 foot high screen.

“He didn’t have a pointer long enough that day,” wrote Chris, of Herndon. “In order to point out a feature at the top of the screen, he used two fishing rods that someone had in the trunk of his car. With tape he could then point to the top of the screen.

Caroline Harwood worked at the Navy Yard in the 1970s and 1980s. His carpool passed a building near there that had “Photographic” in its name. Carolyn wrote: “Do you know if the CIA had an office there?

Answer Man suspects she is referring to Building 213, which became NPIC’s headquarters in 1963 after the organization overran the Steuart Building.

Unlike the Steuart Building, Building 213 – at the southeast corner of First and M SE Streets – was a government office building, more obviously secure. It was surrounded by a chain-link fence topped with barbed wire.

Jack O’Connorretired CIA intelligence officer and author of “NPIC: Seeing Secrets and Growing Leaders: A Cultural History of the National Center for Photographic Interpretation,” said that when an extension was built on the building between 1984 and 1988, the chain-link fence was replaced with a wrought-iron fence and brick-faced concrete columns.

“Also at this time the name of the organization was put above the entrance – National Center for Photographic Interpretation – so that your reader in the carpool would not be mistaken,” he wrote.

Morgan Birge II of Fredericksburg, Va., worked in Building 213 from its opening in January 1963 until the late 1990s. Among his memories, he looks Mike Wallace of “60 Minutes” fame argues with a guard at the gate, trying to get the guard to admit it was a CIA facility. Wallace was instructed to call a phone number for more information.

Due to classified work in Building 213, documents generated there were marked with their security classification. This included the cafeteria menu. “Maybe well deserved,” Morgan said. “The way the food was, they needed to do that.”

Morgan said that to hide the nature of the work going on inside 213, large yellow boxes of film supplies from Eastman Kodak were rewrapped in plain paper before delivery.

Not all work is related to national security. The US Geological Survey occupied part of the sixth floor, accessible by an exterior elevator that bypassed the secret stuff.

“This office investigated rocks brought back from the moon,” Morgan wrote.

Today, the descendant of the NPIC – the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency – is in Springfield. Building 213 was demolished in the summer of 2014. Washington Nationals fans may recall walking past its location on the way to the ballpark. There was a trapeze school on the block that once housed the top secret facility.

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Khaaliq Thomas of SHUTTER8 Video & Photography joins Plugstar Entertainment https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/khaaliq-thomas-of-shutter8-video-photography-joins-plugstar-entertainment/ Sat, 11 Jun 2022 07:04:44 +0000 https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/khaaliq-thomas-of-shutter8-video-photography-joins-plugstar-entertainment/ ATLANTA, GA, June 11, 2022 /24-7PressRelease/ — Celebrity photographer and videographer Khaaliq Thomas has joined Plugstar Entertainment’s growing roster of talent. A native of Detroit, Khaaliq first picked up a camera at the age of 17 out of a desire to emulate his father. He says that in every shot, portrait, montage and opportunity he […]]]>

ATLANTA, GA, June 11, 2022 /24-7PressRelease/ — Celebrity photographer and videographer Khaaliq Thomas has joined Plugstar Entertainment’s growing roster of talent. A native of Detroit, Khaaliq first picked up a camera at the age of 17 out of a desire to emulate his father. He says that in every shot, portrait, montage and opportunity he took, “I was manifesting the life that I now have with photography.”

Although he took a detour to work in front of the camera as a model (which he had also done in his youth), the desire to control the image brought him back behind it. Khaaliq began building his SHUTTER8 brand by photographing public figures and local R&B and hip hop artists, and after moving to New York, he became the personal photographer for rap duo VIXEVERSA.

Returning to Detroit at the age of 23, Khaaliq signed a contract with CJ Heart Studios and diversified his skills to include portrait, wedding, commercial and corporate photography. Additionally, he shoots music videos and commercials and has worked with artists from the rap label 4sho Magazine. With two friends, he has since launched ViewersClub, a video production team of which he is the producer. “My younger brother is a budding director,” he explains. “I wanted to learn videography so that we could follow projects together.”

Khaaliq only shoots with Nikon cameras and uses different colors, angles and techniques to make the viewer feel more connected to the images. He’s photographed Detroit’s WALK fashion show and New Amsterdam’s Black Banana clothing line, been featured in Source magazine, and was a Senior Photographer for Roddy Rich’s. The Antisocial Tour, Billboard Hot 100 Festival, Hot 97 Powerhouse 2018, Babyface Ray’s FACE album launch party, and more. It currently serves Detroit, New York, Atlanta, Los Angeles and Amsterdam.

For reservations and maintenance requests, email [email protected]. Follow him @shutter.8.


Press release service and press release distribution provided by http://www.24-7pressrelease.com

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Olivia Joan on TikTok, photography and fashion https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/olivia-joan-on-tiktok-photography-and-fashion/ Thu, 09 Jun 2022 17:22:25 +0000 https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/olivia-joan-on-tiktok-photography-and-fashion/ Welcome to Favorite Follow, a series highlighting NYLON’s favorite creators and the stories behind some of their most memorable content. If the TikTok algorithm has been good for you, you’ve probably come across At Olivia Joan’s Account. Bright-eyed and fun-loving, the social media star – née Olivia Joan Galli – starts almost every video with […]]]>

Welcome to Favorite Follow, a series highlighting NYLON’s favorite creators and the stories behind some of their most memorable content.

If the TikTok algorithm has been good for you, you’ve probably come across At Olivia Joan’s Account. Bright-eyed and fun-loving, the social media star – née Olivia Joan Galli – starts almost every video with a chipper, “Hi, guys”, before creating an effortlessly fabulous ensemble.

Typically, she presents three outfit options and lets viewers choose what she should wear in the comments, but over time, people have noticed that every outfit recipe includes at least one extremely lavish item. From vintage Prada jackets to Manolo Blahnik shoes, the 24-year-old’s wardrobe is full of designers.

On TikTok, Galli finally revealed that the items once belonged to her late grandmother, Joan B. Johnson, who co-founded Johnson Products Company, with her husband, George Johnson, in 1954. Their historic business provided hair care products like Ultra Sheen and Afro Sheen. to the black community and became the first black-owned company to go public.

When we meet for coffee at Maman’s in Soho, Galli greets me with a warm hug while wearing a brown Louis Vuitton jacket. I mistakenly assume the item of clothing belonged to Mrs. Johnson and make a mental note to ask where it came from. “They have an allowance for me,” she explains later, blushing at my curiosity. It turns out the garment was not her grandmother’s or a product of Galli’s own shopping excursions. Instead, it came to her as a gift from the luxury retailer she now works for.

Although she’s made a name for herself online as a fashionable style guide, Galli isn’t your average influencer. When she’s not posting on TikTok, she can be found running around New York, armed with a camera and a list of shots, to produce photo shoots for her impressive clientele. Despite constant work requests from publications such as vogue and The New York TimesGalli remains humbled, if not surprised, by his success.

“I wanted to quit so many times,” she admits. A career in the arts was a pipe dream come true for Galli, born of her determination and willingness to ignore her family’s concerns. “I struggled because my family didn’t understand the arts. They were more financial and business oriented. So when I said to my family, “I think I want to pursue the arts,” my family said, “Why don’t you go to a real college and do student photography on the side?”

While Galli studied at the Art Institute of Chicago and Pace University, her siblings followed more traditional paths. “They always make jokes [like], “Oh, we’re going to have to put you up in our guest house”, and now they’re thinking, “We might need you to put us up!” she says. “I am the underdog.”

With a number of great photo shoots under her belt and over 80,000 followers on TikTok, that label might be overkill. Now Galli is more than ready to establish her own legacy. Below, we discuss Galli’s professional journey, as well as his experience photographing his family and his accidental rise to TikTok:

On studying photography in college

When I started photography, I wanted to do editorial fashion. But then I fell in love with storytelling. It has always been difficult for me to express my feelings in writing and through verbal communication. Then, an outlet for me was photography, and I could express myself through an image.

At the Chicago Institute, they said, “We don’t have [that], you have to go to New York. You have to go to New York young and do internships. Chicago just doesn’t have that, unless you want to do fine art. But if you want to do like, the New York Timesand magazines, and journalism, you have to go to New York young.

On capturing her grandmother’s essence

The last picture I took of my grandmother was with my grandmother and my mother. I had taken a picture of my grandmother almost two years ago, around my freshman year of college, and she looked so different. She didn’t need oxygen 24/7 and her face wasn’t as swollen because she wasn’t getting radiation. It screwed her up. She was able to walk.

Then this time, in the sophomore picture, she had to have oxygen and you can just see the pain she was going through. It was really emotional for me, because I was like, this is not the grandmother I remember. Then having my mom there too, in the same session, the two of them together – it was very painful and really hard for me to do it, but it had to be done.

You can’t always document the positive things in life. You must document the real and the authentic. It’s the one that solidified for me that storytelling is what I want to do. I just want to document the reality.

On her first big photoshoot

My first project after college was with vogue. They said, “We’ll send you two bags. You can photograph it however you want. I was like, “Oh, this is really intense.” They wanted it in the September issue of vogue. My grandmother died the previous year in September, September 6th. I was like, well, this is going to be the passing of a year. it fits vogue. I have to commemorate my grandmother somehow.

I found this portrait, a painted portrait of my grandmother, and I wanted to incorporate it somehow. I ended up having it just in the background, and the bags set up in my grandparents’ space, kind of showing black excellence and commemorating it as well.

On creating dynamic portraits of men and women

I just finished this really cool project with the New York Times, documenting my family. It was the first time I photographed my brother and my grandfather, and it was a challenge. When it comes to photographing women, I go lower than them to put them more in a position of power, and I do different angles and lighting to make them as powerful as possible – how I perceive them. Then, with the men, I say to myself: “I don’t want that.” It looks really terrible.

So yeah, I was sort of relearning how to photograph men in a powerful way, but not “Yeah, I’m a man.” It was a challenge for me. It’s still, sometimes, intimidating for me, because it’s like, I don’t know, I love photographing women.

I have never seen a gallery display of a bunch of portraits of black women, of all ages, sizes and backgrounds. I feel like it must be a thing.

On his TikTok origin story

None of my friends were responding to my texts. I was going on a date with my ex – he wasn’t my ex at the time – but I had just received these two dresses and I was like, “I don’t know what to wear.”

Before that, I was posting really silly dance videos with my mom, like during quarantine, like we do. I was like, “Okay, just let me do a little TikTok. I might get three answers, I just need someone to tell me because I have to go.

I did and got lots of feedback. A lot of people really liked my style. I was like, “Wait, this is really fun.” It’s also useful for me because I like to browse my TikToks and see the outfits I wore. Then I started having fun posting about dating my ex-boyfriend and going out for lunch, and just different things.

I already had a lot of my grandmother’s clothes. [In videos] I would say, “Oh, those shoes are my grandmother’s.” People started asking, “Who is your grandmother?” Can we see more clothes? It’s so cool that people are interested in her. It started to become the main focus, but now I’m trying to go back to “choosing my outfit” [videos].

On merging his careers in social media and photography

I don’t know how I would do it. I spoke to a content creator; she used to say that when I make “get ready with me” videos, I should tell a story, have a photo as a background – as a green screen background – and talk about the meaning behind the photo.

I just don’t know how well this video would translate. Also, I like to have a separation. It’s interesting, my TikTok name is Olivia Joan, just my grandmother’s name and my middle name, then my photography is Olivia Galli. I feel like I have two separate entities. I have TikTok where it’s, like, an outing. Then photography is my job.

Sometimes I just don’t want to combine the two. I just want to have fun.

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Flowers help Atlanta photographer Allen Cooley find beauty in uncertainty https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/flowers-help-atlanta-photographer-allen-cooley-find-beauty-in-uncertainty/ Tue, 07 Jun 2022 16:53:31 +0000 https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/flowers-help-atlanta-photographer-allen-cooley-find-beauty-in-uncertainty/ Allen CooleyPhotograph by Marie Thomas Ever since Allen Cooley got his dad’s camera back in 2003, he’s had his sights set on flowers. His father used the camera to document family vacations, but Cooley used it to practice the craft, and flowers were one of his first subjects. Cooley, who grew up in New York, […]]]>
Allen Cooley

Photograph by Marie Thomas

Ever since Allen Cooley got his dad’s camera back in 2003, he’s had his sights set on flowers. His father used the camera to document family vacations, but Cooley used it to practice the craft, and flowers were one of his first subjects.

Cooley, who grew up in New York, moved to Georgia in the early 2000s to earn her computer science degree at Albany State University. He set up his first studio in his apartment by taping sheets to the walls and began taking photos of local friends and talent.

A few months after graduation, he moved to Atlanta and studied photography at the Savannah College of Art & Design. He says it was there that he realized photographers could have an artistic voice, and flowers became an essential part of his. In the collection Courtney – A Visual Representation of a Love I Don’t Completely Understandwhich he shot ten years ago, Cooley placed flowers at different stages of the life cycle in front of a black background to depict the ups and downs of relationships.

“I’m usually constrained by everything that’s going on in my life right now,” says Cooley, 37, who shoots some of his artwork on film with a Hasselblad 501c. “The flower series was the first where I moved away from photographing people.”

Allen Cooley
Cooley’s work ranges from celebrity portraits to fine art photography.

Photograph by Marie Thomas

Today, Cooley is a highly sought-after photographer, shooting for Toni Braxton, Magic Johnson, Kevin Hart, Raven-Symoné, Keke Palmer and Lynn Whitfield. But he is still attracted to flowers.

Lately, they’ve helped him find beauty in uncertainty. In 2020, Cooley celebrated the birth of his first child, and a few months later his mother died of Covid-19 and he was diagnosed with Hodgkin’s lymphoma. During quarantine and on days when chemotherapy was wearing him down, he picked flowers and photographed them in his English Park studio.

Allen Cooley
INNOCENCE, 2014

Photography by Allen Cooley

“I don’t have to apologize to the flowers for having to reschedule, so I decided to take pictures of the flowers,” Cooley says. “I want my art to take me away from the loss, no further. I want to make sure I don’t pass that trauma on to my daughter. I want to be able to talk about this time happily for her.

Cooley is represented by Arnika Dawkins Gallery, 4600 Cascade Road, 404-333-0312, adawkinsgallery.com.

This article originally appeared in our Spring 2022 issue of HOUSE of Atlanta Magazine.

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