Photography – David Hemmings Bird Photography http://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/ Tue, 22 Nov 2022 07:10:16 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-2021-06-25T155134.587.png Photography – David Hemmings Bird Photography http://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/ 32 32 Do Good Fund Southern Photography https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/do-good-fund-southern-photography/ Tue, 22 Nov 2022 03:03:02 +0000 https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/do-good-fund-southern-photography/ Founded in 2012 in Columbus, Georgia by Alan Rothschild Jr. (UGA JD ’85), the Make a good fund has built a collection of museum-quality photographs that chart an ever-changing visual narrative of the American South from the 1950s to the present day. The collection includes images by more than 25 Guggenheim Fellows, five Magnum photographers […]]]>

Founded in 2012 in Columbus, Georgia by Alan Rothschild Jr. (UGA JD ’85), the Make a good fund has built a collection of museum-quality photographs that chart an ever-changing visual narrative of the American South from the 1950s to the present day. The collection includes images by more than 25 Guggenheim Fellows, five Magnum photographers and two Henri Cartier-Bresson Prize winners, as well as prints by lesser-known or emerging photographers from the region. The exhibition is presented at the Georgia Museum of Art at the University of Georgia, which organized the show, Reckonings and Reconstructions: Southern Photography from the Do Good Fund is the first large-scale study of the fund’s remarkable and vast collection.

The exhibition highlights a broad group of photographers – of gender, race, ethnicity and region – and features 125 photographs by 73 artists, including Gordon Parks, Sheila Pree Bright, Mark Steinmetz, Michael Stipe and William Christenberry . It poses key questions that identify and complicate conventional ideas of an “American South” and a “photograph of the South.” For example, how do the photographs navigate the interface between nature and culture in the South, as well as the ravages of extraction and? How do the photographers connect stories of daily labor and caretaking to the region’s painful stories of bonded and incarcerated labor? How did the photographs capture the performance of southern community and identity through civic and religious rituals? How did the medium signal exclusion and estrangement, but also belonging and kinship in the American South?

The themes of land, labor, law and protest, food, ritual and kinship connect disparate works in the fund’s collection. Together they capture Southern history, culture and identity in all their complexity and contradictions. In doing so, they resist notions of the South as a retrograde region and instead present the enigmatic and “ever-changing” qualities of the place and its people: a region of despair and hope, terror and beauty, pain and joy, and indignity and dignity mingle; a place in search of reconciliation and restoration, captured by photographers with an ethical vision for a “Better South”.

Jeffrey Richmond-Moll, the Museum of American Art’s curator, who curated the exhibit, said, “Athens, Georgia has long been known as a city of music, but it’s also a prolific community. of photographers, artists who still call it home to those who honed their craft here as students at the University of Georgia. For this reason, we are also thrilled to include a gallery highlighting Athens’ role in the history of southern photography while the exhibit is on view at the Georgia Museum of Art. These works show Athens as a center of gravity for alternative culture and as a microcosm for the changing American South that the rest of the exhibition presents to its viewers.

“Reckonings and Reconstructions” will be accompanied by the first complete catalog of the photographic holdings of the Do Good Fund, co-published by the museum and University of Georgia Press. The exhibition and catalog are generously sponsored by the Wyeth Foundation for American Art, the More Foundation, the Bradley Hale Fund for Southern Studies at the University of Georgia Press, the W. Newton Morris Charitable Foundation Fund, and the Friends of the Georgia Museum of Art. .

The exhibition will travel to the Chrysler Museum of Art from August 11, 2023 to January 7, 2024; the Lowe Art Museum, University of Miami, from February 8 to May 18, 2024, and the Figge Art Museum from June 15 to September 8, 2024.

Reckonings and Reconstructions: Southern Photography from the Do Good Fund
On view from October 8, 2022 to January 8, 2023
Georgia Art Museum
at the University of Georgia
90 Carlton Street
Athens, Georgia 30602
www.georgiamuseum.org/reckonings-symposium

]]>
TAB organizes a photography contest, a workshop https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/tab-organizes-a-photography-contest-a-workshop/ Sat, 19 Nov 2022 21:06:37 +0000 https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/tab-organizes-a-photography-contest-a-workshop/ Over the summer, a number of TAB Media photographers received a package in the mail. Their directive: participate in a photo scavenger hunt to grow TAB’s photo library and take the opportunity to have fun and be creative. Several months and several hundred photos later, Jim Veneman, a longtime Baptist broadcaster, judged the submitted photos […]]]>

Over the summer, a number of TAB Media photographers received a package in the mail.

Their directive: participate in a photo scavenger hunt to grow TAB’s photo library and take the opportunity to have fun and be creative.

Several months and several hundred photos later, Jim Veneman, a longtime Baptist broadcaster, judged the submitted photos and awarded prizes to those who participated.

The winners were:

  • Tracy Riggs, first place for the best shot and the most varied and second place for the most creative.
  • Bethany Franklin, first place for most creative and second place for best photo.

Veneman was a photo editor at Lifeway Christian Resources from 1986 to 1999. He later served as Director of Visual Communications and Adjunct Professor of Communication Arts at Union University. He is now an assistant professor of journalism at California Baptist University.

Veneman and his wife, Carol, made the trip to Birmingham to lead some of the TAB photographers in a photography workshop on November 4.

Veneman offered practical tips for taking the best photos, but also emphasized the importance of photographers’ role in the ministry of storytelling.

“If we give our best to the work we have been called to, telling its story, our stories will also be told,” he said. (Media TAB)


The Baptist Paper Ranks in EPA Awards Competition

In the Evangelical Press Association’s Mid-Year Awards competition, The Baptist Paper placed in two top categories.

TAB Media Group submitted the national publication, now in its second year, for review this summer. The Baptist Paper earned second place in the Newspapers category and fifth place in the Websites – Class B category. (Media TAB)

]]>
BYU student shares his journey to telling meaningful stories through photography https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/byu-student-shares-his-journey-to-telling-meaningful-stories-through-photography/ Wed, 16 Nov 2022 22:17:05 +0000 https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/byu-student-shares-his-journey-to-telling-meaningful-stories-through-photography/ Photographer Lily Balif shares the factors that have shaped her in her photography journey. Balif seeks to tell stories through his photography. (Made in Procreate by Tenley Hale) Lily Balif, a BYU student and photographer, hopes her work will communicate something deeper than a beautiful image to look at. “Whether it’s annoying people, upsetting them, […]]]>
Photographer Lily Balif shares the factors that have shaped her in her photography journey. Balif seeks to tell stories through his photography. (Made in Procreate by Tenley Hale)

Lily Balif, a BYU student and photographer, hopes her work will communicate something deeper than a beautiful image to look at.

“Whether it’s annoying people, upsetting them, or making them feel good, I just want people to feel something when they see my work.” Balif said.

Lily Balif takes a selfie. Balif hopes his work will make people feel something deeper. (Photo courtesy of Lily Balif)

Balif grew up in a family of nine siblings with parents who encouraged them to pursue their creative endeavors.

From writers, graphic designers, philosophers, carpenters and photographers, Balif was exposed to many creative mediums through her siblings. She attributes her passion for photography to this early access to creative mentors.

Another important creative mentor for Balif was his high school photography teacher, William Salley.

“He saw my desire to become a real photographer and to push myself artistically, so he gave me extra attention,” Balif said. “Having this mentor to push me and believe in me was a catalyst for my passion for photography.”

After high school, Balif came to BYU and entered the Interdisciplinary Design program with a major in photography. balif said studying at BYU was a great experience.

“I was very lucky to have teachers who understood my work and supported my unique journey here at BYU,” Balif said.

Her biggest complaint with her BYU photo classes is that people are so positive it can be hard to get reviews.

“I love how people see other people as children of God, but at the same time I just want to say, ‘Be mean to me, give me real feedback,'” Balif said.

BYU photography professor Daniel George said what he loved most about teaching at BYU was seeing the students develop their ideas into physical labor.

George said he got to see Balif develop his own ideas and style this semester. “For Lily, I can see that she is very aware of the communicative aspects of the photographic medium and how it functions as a language,” George said.

balif said the communicative nature of photography is his passion.

“I like art or media that is so accessible that anyone can look at it and connect with it,” Balif said. “I want people to look at my work and see a world they identify with.”

Some of her biggest influences come from movies like Wong Kar-wai’s “In the Mood for Love” or anything written by Norah Ephron. Other influences include photographers like Molly Matalon, Martin Parr, Carrie Mae Weems and William Eggleston. Balif is drawn to photographers who can tell a story or create a new world with a photograph.

balif said one of the most important things for her when creating photographs is intention.

“A lot of people think of photography as just taking pictures of things that are already there, and that’s true, but sometimes that can be an excuse to fall back on,” Balif said.

She said her desire to make her work intentional is what drives her to pay attention to small details and take responsibility for every part of an image.

“Even though I can’t completely explain why I kept something in a photo, I have to be able to say, ‘It was a choice,'” Balif said. “These intentional details, in my opinion, separate a photographer from a true artist.”

Balif said she is drawn to perfect lighting and beautiful shadows, which she says can make her work look idealistic. His hope is to create images that are beautiful and striking to the point that they seem to draw the viewer in.

Thomas Blackwelder befriended Balif through Instagram and often modeled for her. “Our relationship has always become very natural,” Blackwelder said. “She’ll have an idea and I’ll instantly be there to help her.”

Blackwelder shared that one of the things he loves most about modeling for Balif is the unspoken connection they share.

“Our friend once compared us to a figure skating team, it works,” Blackwelder said.

In 2020, the dynamic duo decided to create Billy’s portrait studio.

“I was really inspired by the high school yearbook photos from the 70s and 80s and decided it would be fun to try and recreate that,” Balif said.

The team took portraits at seven events around Provo before life got too busy. “It was a really fun experience creating work that wasn’t so serious,” Balif said.

Balif said managing Billy’s Portrait Studio helped her realize she didn’t enjoy the management side of photography.

“It helped me realize that I had no desire to be a brand, just a photographer,” Balif said.

For Blackwelder, Balif’s attention to detail and creative process makes her more than just a photographer.

“When I talk about Lily, she’s an artist whose primary medium is photography,” Blackwelder said. “Her work is meant to mean something and communicate an idea, and that’s what sets her apart.”

Printable, PDF and email version

]]>
Remains of Alpine forts feature in Marc Wilson’s Remnants photograph https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/remains-of-alpine-forts-feature-in-marc-wilsons-remnants-photograph/ Mon, 14 Nov 2022 10:45:00 +0000 https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/remains-of-alpine-forts-feature-in-marc-wilsons-remnants-photograph/ British photographer Marc Wilson has produced a series of images exploring the ruins of WW1 forts and trenches in the mountains of northern Italy. The photographs appear in Remnants, a book that Wilson published in collaboration with Italian architect and researcher Marco Ferrari. The project follows The last Standa book Wilson produced in 2015 exploring […]]]>

British photographer Marc Wilson has produced a series of images exploring the ruins of WW1 forts and trenches in the mountains of northern Italy.

The photographs appear in Remnants, a book that Wilson published in collaboration with Italian architect and researcher Marco Ferrari. The project follows The last Standa book Wilson produced in 2015 exploring similar structures on the coasts of the British Isles and northern Europe.

In each image, the physical traces of war – including trenches, fortifications and battlefields – appear to have merged with natural elements and become part of the topography.

Wilson and Ferrari hope to show that these structures are not just relics of history, but indicators of how humans might one day live more in harmony with the natural world.

“The foundations of the project were rooted not only in the historical look of these First World War mountain forts, but also in an ecological perspective,” Wilson told Dezeen.

“These man-made forts, created more than a century ago, are now part of the fabric of the natural landscape they once defended,” he said.

In a Dezeen exclusive, Wilson picked out six of the most memorable sites he’s visited. They are pictured here with their accompanying captions:


Spitz Levico

Also known as Forte Vezzena, Spitz Levico’s nickname was “the eye of the plains”, referring to its primary function as an observatory.

At 1,908 meters it sits above Forte Busa Verle and together they formed the northernmost line of defence.


Forte Zaccarana from Remnants photography by Marc Wilson

Fort Zaccarana

At 2,116 meters, the concrete Zaccarana, also known as Forte Tonale, was the tallest and most advanced fort in the Tonale Valley.

Designed to block the Sole and Strino valleys with Forte Pozzi Alti, it was almost entirely obliterated by heavy bombardment from Forte Corno d’Aola, the only Italian fort on the border.


Forte Dossaccio

Forte Dossaccio

Despite its location close to the front line, Dossaccio was decommissioned in 1915 and its four guns were moved to nearby woods.

Mainly designed for long-range combat, it culminates at 1,838 meters and was connected by telephone to the forts of Buso and Moena.


Forte Dosso del Sommo from Remnants photography by Marc Wilson

Fort Dosso del Sommo

Perched at 1,665 meters and completed in 1914, the Dosso del Sommo had the function of blocking the Terragnolo Valley and the Borcola Pass.

Three storeys high, it was one of the largest Austro-Hungarian forts. Early in the conflict it came under heavy Italian fire but was never fully attacked.


Fort Campo Lucerna

Fort Campo Lucerna

Due to its capacity, the fort was nicknamed Padreterno – Eternal Father – by the Italians. After suffering a devastating Italian bombardment at the end of May 1915, its commander, Emanuel Nebesar, raised a white flag.

As neighboring forts fired on the Italians to prevent the capture of Campo Lucerna, a volunteer marched towards the fort and tore down the flag of surrender. Subsequently arrested, Nebesar avoided a court-martial for cowardice.


Forte Moena from Remnants photography by Marc Wilson

Fort Moena

Also known as Forte Someda, Moena, built of granite, was designed to prevent progress through the San Pellegrino Valley.

Perched at 1,276 meters, it was in telephone contact with Fort Dossaccio. Built between 1897 and 1899, it was considered obsolete by 1915 and its armaments were moved to field positions in the San Pellegrino Pass.

]]>
‘Abandoned Kentucky’ Book Preserves State’s History Through Photography https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/abandoned-kentucky-book-preserves-states-history-through-photography/ Thu, 10 Nov 2022 22:45:00 +0000 https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/abandoned-kentucky-book-preserves-states-history-through-photography/ Three Kentucky men preserve the state’s past through photography. They bring history to life in a new book called “Abandoned Kentucky,” using cameras and drones to capture abandoned properties across the Commonwealth. The book combines words and images to tell the story of long-forgotten places like the Merchant’s old ice and cold storage tower in […]]]>

Three Kentucky men preserve the state’s past through photography. They bring history to life in a new book called “Abandoned Kentucky,” using cameras and drones to capture abandoned properties across the Commonwealth. The book combines words and images to tell the story of long-forgotten places like the Merchant’s old ice and cold storage tower in Smoketown. Award-winning photographers and historians Sherman Cahal, Michael Maes and Adam Paris have traveled thousands of miles across the state photographing a variety of vacant properties including homes, schools and cemeteries. They stated that the purpose of documenting them is to show readers that there is more to these sites than meets the eye. “We hope people will at least take away from the book that there is beauty in decay, and that there is more behind these walls than people might imagine,” said Cahal, who lives in ‘outside. of Ashland. Maes is from Louisville and thinks people are really curious about the mystery behind abandoned properties. “People try to put these pieces together to tell the story, and if you can do that with your photos, I think a lot of people respond to that,” he said. According to the photographers, each page of the book is designed to preserve the memory of a different historic site in case it is demolished in the future. “What you see today may not be here tomorrow,” Cahal said. That’s why they believe documenting Kentucky’s history is so important. will give people interest and inspiration to remember the history of where we live,” said Paris, who lives in Owensboro. The three photographers encourage people who read the book to venture out and find the Beauty of Abandoned Abandoned Kentucky is available at local bookstores across the state and is sold online by Amazon and Barnes & Noble.

Three Kentucky men preserve the state’s past through photography.

They bring history to life in a new book called “Abandoned Kentucky,” using cameras and drones to capture abandoned properties across the Commonwealth.

The book combines words and images to tell the story of long-forgotten places like the Merchant’s old ice and cold storage tower in Smoketown.

Award-winning photographers and historians Sherman Cahal, Michael Maes and Adam Paris have traveled thousands of miles across the state photographing a variety of vacant properties including homes, schools and cemeteries.

They said the purpose of documenting them is to show readers that these sites are more than meets the eye.

“We hope people will at least take away from the book that there is beauty in decadence, and that there is more behind these walls than people might imagine,” said Cahal, who lives in exterior of Ashland.

Maes is from Louisville and thinks people are really curious about the mystery behind abandoned properties.

“People are trying to put these pieces together to tell the story, and if you can do that with your photographs, I think a lot of people will react to that,” he said.

According to the photographers, each page of the book is designed to preserve the memory of a different historic site in case it is demolished in the future.

“What you see today might not be there tomorrow,” Cahal said.

That’s why they believe documenting Kentucky’s history is so important.

“I hope the book will give people interest and inspiration to remember the history of where we live,” said Paris, who lives in Owensboro.

The three photographers encourage people who read the book to venture out and discover the beauty of abandonment.

abandoned kentucky is available at local bookstores across the state, and is sold online by Amazon and Barnes & Nobles.

]]>
Reimer presents 50 years of photography to Pratt – Pratt Tribune https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/reimer-presents-50-years-of-photography-to-pratt-pratt-tribune/ Tue, 08 Nov 2022 15:02:20 +0000 https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/reimer-presents-50-years-of-photography-to-pratt-pratt-tribune/ By John Huxman Freelance journalist jdhux2007@yahoo.com On Saturday, November 5, a special hallway exhibit opened at the Vernon Filley Art Museum showcasing 50 years of Pratt’s Stan Reimer photography. The exhibition will be open to the public until March 18 and there will be a mid-term reception on January 28 from 5-7 p.m. One surprise […]]]>

By John Huxman
Freelance journalist jdhux2007@yahoo.com

On Saturday, November 5, a special hallway exhibit opened at the Vernon Filley Art Museum showcasing 50 years of Pratt’s Stan Reimer photography. The exhibition will be open to the public until March 18 and there will be a mid-term reception on January 28 from 5-7 p.m.

One surprise Reimer included in the showcase of his life’s work is a photo he took in sixth grade. He said he saved money selling vegetables at a roadside stall to buy his first camera. It was the start of an illustrious career, punctuated by a few twists and turns, but which always came back to photography.

After majoring in music and psychology as a student at Bethel College in North Newton, Kansas, Reimer took up band management at Winfield for 10 years. It was after this stint as a teacher that he decided to take up photography full time. He moved to Pratt in 1975 and bought a photography studio. Its first location was on First Street. He had a second location on Second Street which he sold when he was 65.

Reimer currently has his photography business spread across three locations in Pratt; one in the 400 block of S. Main Street, a camera room on Third Street, and a production studio in his basement at his home.

“I basically did all kinds of photography for the last time, well, I still do now. I’m overwhelmed with work at the moment, mostly portraits. I did 10,000 high school sessions and I did 1,000 weddings,” he said. “We stopped number one thousand.”

Reimer said he’s done all kinds of photography, from landscapes to the Miss Kansas pageant.

“All there was to do, I did,” he said.

Reimer oversaw the creation of the Vernon Filley Art Museum. Thirty years ago, he said he was approached by Emily “Mimi” Filley to create a place where his art collection could be displayed.

“I built the place,” he said.

Filley made a generous donation to build the museum, and Reimer was told to put together a board of trustees to oversee the project. Ten years later, the museum was opened.

Reimer said he remained director of the museum for the next 20 years until his retirement a month ago. Mimi Filley’s husband, Vernon, had been a surgeon at Pratt, and she collected art all her life. Reimer said she donated her entire collection to the museum. He said running the museum had taken a lot of his time over the past 20 years, but he kept taking pictures.

When asked about his favorite works, Reimer mentioned two of his works at the Sherman Hines Museum of Photography in Liverpool, Nova Scotia. They are two portraits. He also said he was pleased to present one of his most recent works which is part of the current exhibition at Vernon Filley; a photograph of fall leaves in Lemon Park.

As for the type of photographic work he enjoyed the most, Reimer said it was senior photography.

“There was such a variety of people and they always wanted something different,” he said. Throughout his photography career, Reimer said he enjoyed getting to know the people of this part of Kansas through his studio.

When asked what some of his biggest challenges have been over the years, Reimer said he’s been watching the decline of professional photography. He takes photography very seriously and has spent a lot of time and money on training over the years. He attended classes and seminars around the country, earning Master Photographer status, a status determined by someone having had at least 25 of his photographs selected for national exposure by the Professional Photographers of America. (Only four photographs can be entered per year).

To date, Reimer has had 92 of his photographs chosen by this prestigious organization for exhibition. He is a master craftsman photographer, which qualifies him to teach professionals. Reimer said he saw his profession downgraded by advances in technology.

“Today everyone has a cell phone and a digital camera,” he said. “They think they are photographers without feeling the need to know even the basics. They no longer see the need for professional photography. Consequently, the profession has declined both in number and in professionalism.

Reimer’s exhibition at Le Filley showcases his work dating back to the beginning of his 50 years of photography with great variety. To see this show, check the museum’s opening hours at http://www. vernonfilleyartmuseum. org/ as well as information on the various shows.

Reimer hinted at the possibility of having several special screenings of his work for budding photographers. If this happens, the information will be online.

]]>
Bob Haines, Freeman’s retired photographer, dies at 82 – Daily Freeman https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/bob-haines-freemans-retired-photographer-dies-at-82-daily-freeman/ Sat, 05 Nov 2022 20:30:35 +0000 https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/bob-haines-freemans-retired-photographer-dies-at-82-daily-freeman/ KINGSTON, NY – Bob Haines, retired Freeman photographer, died on Friday, November 4. He was 82 years old. Haines retired from the Freeman in 2006 after 39 years of career capturing the ups and downs in both Kingston and the Mid-Hudson area, starting in 1967, when the newspaper’s headquarters were still located in a historic […]]]>

KINGSTON, NY – Bob Haines, retired Freeman photographer, died on Friday, November 4. He was 82 years old.

Haines retired from the Freeman in 2006 after 39 years of career capturing the ups and downs in both Kingston and the Mid-Hudson area, starting in 1967, when the newspaper’s headquarters were still located in a historic building at the foot of Broadway that now houses the restaurant and Mariner’s Harbor apartments.

Over the course of his career, Haines has photographed everything from local business ribbon cuttings to the Bill Clinton-Boris Yeltsin mini-summit in Hyde Park in 1995. He has taken pictures of movie stars including Dustin Hoffman and Jessica Lange, who were in Ulster County filming the movie “Tootsie”. “, and Barbra Streisand and Walter Mathou, during the filming of “Hello Dolly”. He even got the chance to photograph his childhood idol, Mickey Mantle, lamenting that he didn’t think to ask anyone to take a picture of him with the baseball great.

]]>
The photographer’s images give a glimpse of the places dear to the imprisoned activists https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/the-photographers-images-give-a-glimpse-of-the-places-dear-to-the-imprisoned-activists/ Wed, 02 Nov 2022 23:02:22 +0000 https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/the-photographers-images-give-a-glimpse-of-the-places-dear-to-the-imprisoned-activists/ “Jeffrey Luers, ‘Happy’, Fall Creek, OR,” Kelly Sena, 2007, archival pigment print, 43×53⅛ inches. (Courtesy of Kelly Sena) Kelly Sena began writing to incarcerated environmental and animal rights activists in 2006. The photographer would ask them about the places they traveled inside their minds – the places that keep them sane. Sena then offered to […]]]>
“Jeffrey Luers, ‘Happy’, Fall Creek, OR,” Kelly Sena, 2007, archival pigment print, 43×53⅛ inches. (Courtesy of Kelly Sena)

Kelly Sena began writing to incarcerated environmental and animal rights activists in 2006.

The photographer would ask them about the places they traveled inside their minds – the places that keep them sane.

Sena then offered to be their eyes.

“I’ll go over there to take a picture for you,” she told them.

After many years of photographing various locations across the country, Sena has curated the solo exhibit, “For the Wild,” which opens Friday, November 4 at Foto Forum Santa Fe. The exhibit will run through November 25. January.

Sage Paisner, executive director of Foto Forum Santa Fe, saw some of Sena’s work in Los Angeles and knew he wanted to bring his work to Santa Fe.

“The beauty of the images, the scale and the composition help you put yourself in the picture,” he says. “She works with an 8 by 10 camera and usually men work with them because they’re so big. She brings her magic to each photograph.

“Peter Young, Badlands, SD”, Kelly Sena, 2008, archival pigment print, 43 × 53¾ inches. (Courtesy of Kelly Sena)

The impetus behind the project began in 2002, when Sena read Edward Abbey’s “The Monkey Wrench Gang”. Shortly after reading the book, she discovered that the Federal Bureau of Investigations was targeting the Earth Liberation Front and the Liberal Animal Front as the top domestic terrorist threat in the United States.

“Since then, the assault on the biosphere has increased, unabated,” Sena says. “Collectively, 1.118 billion tons of carbon have been released into the atmosphere since 1996, when the Earth Liberation Front’s first action against climate change took place.

Sena says that 26 years later, Pakistan suffered the worst spring heat waves followed by an extreme monsoon summer.

“Today a third of Pakistan (the size of the UK) was inundated by floods and displaced 33 million people,” Sena said. “Pakistan is only responsible for 0.1% of global emissions. The United States is responsible for 21.5%, China for 16.5% and the European Union for 15%. Global surface temperatures have reached the sixth hottest summer months on record in 2022. Extreme climate anomalies are on the rise and disproportionately affect countries and communities that emit the minimum emissions. Fossil capitalism is killing our planet.

Paisner says Foto Forum Santa Fe is a space where he gives artists a chance to express themselves.

“I just try to show a diversity of content as well as artists,” says Paisner. “She’s Chicana and has a point of view.”

]]>
Some thoughts on overcoming photographic blockages https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/some-thoughts-on-overcoming-photographic-blockages/ Sun, 30 Oct 2022 15:00:00 +0000 https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/some-thoughts-on-overcoming-photographic-blockages/ I find myself in a transitional phase in relation to photography. I didn’t pick up my camera with a decisive thought or the motivation to go shoot something a few months from now. Everyone hits a wall at some point. I’m only five years into my photographic journey, which isn’t really in the grand scheme […]]]>

I find myself in a transitional phase in relation to photography. I didn’t pick up my camera with a decisive thought or the motivation to go shoot something a few months from now.

Everyone hits a wall at some point. I’m only five years into my photographic journey, which isn’t really in the grand scheme of things, and yet at that time I started to see a trend: I maybe to be a good streak, where the photos come out the way I imagined them and I feel like I’m settling into a good routine, but every year for about four months I lose all momentum and my camera sits on a shelf collecting dust. I never gave it much thought since I always managed to get back on my feet, but as I found myself in the doldrums again, I started thinking about my coping mechanisms.

So here’s how I’m trying to overcome the year-long photography block.

Step 1: Be inspired

I find that by the time I realize I’m in a rut, I’ve already stopped consuming photography. It takes me too long to notice that I haven’t picked up a photo book in months, or watched a movie with great cinematography, or at the very least opened up social media to check out what my favorite photographer is posting. But, once I’ve done it, it changes my whole look, and all of a sudden I want to go outside and photograph something, anything.

Note: I’ve only recently started building a physical collection of my favorite photographers’ work, and while it’s not a lot, it is better than nothing. I’m not at the stage where I can unreservedly recommend that you buy the biggest and best collection, but I will say that even small paperbacks with poor print quality are better than seeing pictures on a screen.

There are many other ways to get inspired. Check the museums in your area, maybe there is a weekend photography exhibition or a photo walk organized by a local group. I know it’s much more case dependent, but it’s worth mentioning.

Printing your own images is another way to get inspired; you see your work in a new medium, probably in a larger size than before, and this can give insight into what you like about your style or what you would like to change/experiment with.

Step 2: Exit

This, for me, is the hardest part. Hopefully the momentum of inspiration is enough to push you out the door and into the world; however, if not, here is what tends to help me.

You might be interested in…

Set small goals
I will tell myself that my task for the day is to capture, for example, interesting shadows. As simple as that; shadows are everywhere, and the time of day and your location will bring variety to your images. You can sit on a park bench and photograph the same shadow of a tree all day long if you don’t feel like going too far. For me, it basically removes any decision paralysis, it gets me out there and it gets me to press the shutter while being able to practice working with light and composition.

Make it a group effort
I tend to involve people around me in a photo walk, whether it’s my siblings when I’m home or my new roommates. You set a time limit, say an hour, and walk around the neighborhood and capture what you see. You can offer them ideas, teach them a bit of photography if they’re new, and when you retrieve the images, you can compare the results. They don’t have access to a film camera? Phones work just as well. I tend to give them my Olympus XA and let them have fun.

Leave the camera at home
Every time I go out, I have my camera with me, and I’m currently testing a theory that it may be just as detrimental to his (or at least mine) photography. I find that after a while, I start to get disappointed when I don’t take a picture during a day, which can be very demotivating. Go out for a walk and admire your surroundings, perhaps even viewing potential photos without relying on a camera. Ultimately, it’s more personal, but for those going through similar thought processes, it can be helpful.

In the end, the important thing is that you get out by any means possible. Interior photography projects have their own place, but I find going out clears my mind and allows me to reset.

Step 3: Reject stagnation, embrace routine

It may seem a bit paradoxical, but be patient. The important thing once you start breaking out of a photography block is to start a routine. Change your initial routine from before the block, perhaps incorporating an aspect you missed before; for example, taking a few hours out of your week to browse photography books at the library.

I think I want to be more consistent in creating scriptures to accompany my photography since it allows me to reassess my images in a new light. Some of the photographs featured in this article I haven’t seen in almost a year, and I’ve gained a new appreciation for them, seeing what I’d like to incorporate or remove in my photography today. Related to step 2, I set myself what I consider to be a realistic update goal my blog at least once a month from now on.

Conclusion

If it’s not clear yet, I wrote this article just as much to myself as for anyone going through something similar. I don’t claim to have all the solutions but the ones listed worked for me; if you have any ideas or proven approaches, please add them in the comments below! And if you find yourself in a photography block now, I hope this post is the boost you need to get back out there.

~Simon

Share your knowledge, your story or your project

Knowledge transfer across the film photography community is at the heart of EMULSIVE. You can add your support by contributing your thoughts, work, experiences and ideas to inspire the hundreds of thousands of people who read these pages every month. View the submission guide here.

If you like what you read, you can also help this passion project by heading to the Patreon EMULSIVE page and contribute as little as a dollar a month. There is also prints and clothing at Society 6Currently featuring over two dozen t-shirt designs and over a dozen unique photographs available for purchase.

About the Author

]]>
Photos of Appalachia – The Washington Post https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/photos-of-appalachia-the-washington-post/ Mon, 24 Oct 2022 11:32:27 +0000 https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/photos-of-appalachia-the-washington-post/ For more than a decade, photographer Stacy Kranitz has worked in Appalachia. The fruits of that labor are now available in his book, “As it was given to me”, recently published by Twin Palms Publishers. Much of the photographic work that has emanated from Appalachia over the years has proven both controversial and emotionally charged. […]]]>

For more than a decade, photographer Stacy Kranitz has worked in Appalachia. The fruits of that labor are now available in his book, “As it was given to me”, recently published by Twin Palms Publishers.

Much of the photographic work that has emanated from Appalachia over the years has proven both controversial and emotionally charged. Most of the time, the very people who live in the area have objected to what they believe to be an inaccurate portrayal of their lives.

This is very understandable as much of the work has focused on the poverty and “backwardness” of Appalachia. But of course, Appalachia is much more complex than these kinds of representations.

In a sense, Kranitz’s book seeks to provide a means of encountering the region more accurately, acknowledging the problem than previous depictions of place and people. The publisher’s description of the book on its website gives us the following to contemplate:

“For the past twelve years, Stacy Kranitz has photographed the Appalachian region of the United States to explore how photography can solidify or demystify stereotypes, and interpret memory and history in a region where the medium failed to provide a fair view. representation of his people. Rather than reinforcing conventional views of Appalachia as a region plagued by poverty, or selectively dwelling on the positive aspects of the place and its people to offset problematic stereotypes, this work insists that each of these options is an equally problematic way to look at the place.

Long-format photographic works are, in essence, a kind of proposition brought into the world. Once there, the work is open to the viewer’s interpretation. This is really the case with any type of creative effort intended to communicate in a larger sense. This is of course the case with “As It Was Give(n) To Me”.

Kranitz’s book is full of the kind of images that have caused angst over the years – there’s poverty, religious snake masters, coal miners – a lot of the kind of images we’re used to to see Appalachia. But there is much more than that.

Throughout the book are artifacts – pressed plants that Kranitz picked up without taking photographs – as well as excerpts from a local diary of people sharing their thoughts on life. If the book manages to go beyond the stereotypical representation of Appalachia, it is not so much because of the photographs, but in the combination of all the elements it contains.

The photographs, on their own, can be quite sublime at times. There are powerful images. But the real star of the book, for me, are the emotionally charged words taken from a weekly column in The Mountain Eagle, a Whitesburgh, Ky. newspaper. These, along with the plants and cobwebs that Kranitz collected, bring the whole company together. . And it is only through this combination of elements that the idea of ​​presenting another perception of the region is realized.

Once you start experiencing all the elements together, and not JUST the photographs, a more nuanced narrative of Appalachia begins to reveal itself. There are, and have been, arguments circulating that photographs never really tell the truth. Instead, they are mostly impressions. And that may be all we can hope for. With that in mind, “As It Was Give(n) To Me” is an important collection of Kranitz’s impressions, sometimes profound, sometimes mundane, over the years. This book is his proposition thrown out into the world, ready to be accepted, denied, or communed with.

You can read more about the book, and buy it, here.

]]>