Photographer – David Hemmings Bird Photography http://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/ Fri, 24 Jun 2022 21:27:00 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-2021-06-25T155134.587.png Photographer – David Hemmings Bird Photography http://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/ 32 32 How to Edit Your Digital Photos to Look Like Movies https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/how-to-edit-your-digital-photos-to-look-like-movies/ Fri, 24 Jun 2022 21:02:32 +0000 https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/how-to-edit-your-digital-photos-to-look-like-movies/ Analog photography has enjoyed a renaissance in recent years, but despite an increase in demand, film prices are exorbitant and availability is scarce. Luckily, there are plenty of ways to edit digital photos to look like movies. We spoke with portrait photographer and editor Dustin Stockel, who started The Archetype Process (TAP), a company dedicated […]]]>

Analog photography has enjoyed a renaissance in recent years, but despite an increase in demand, film prices are exorbitant and availability is scarce. Luckily, there are plenty of ways to edit digital photos to look like movies.

We spoke with portrait photographer and editor Dustin Stockel, who started The Archetype Process (TAP), a company dedicated to creating realistic emulations of classic films in the form of camera profiles. Prior to founding TAP, Stockel worked as a photo editor in film labs and for private clients.

Profiles vs Presets

Modified using The Archetype Process Kodak Portra 400 +1 Normal Frontier profile. The Archetype Process

Related: Go back to the cinema? Here’s what changed

There is no shortage of choice in the market when it comes to emulating a movie in post. Mastin Labs and Noble Presets have made a name for themselves among the leading preset manufacturers in the market. But how do presets differ from profiles? Although both are intended to be applied to Raw files, they actually work quite differently.

Presets are exactly what they sound like. When using a Raw processing platform like Lightroom or Capture One, a preset is applied to an image or series of images with just a few mouse clicks. This automatically adjusts various editing parameters, such as exposure, contrast, grain, etc., within the rig to mimic a specific film look. Once applied, these parameters can be lowered (or increased) at the discretion of the user.

Color profiles, on the other hand, are usually applied to images right after they are ingested and before any changes are applied. In most Raw processors, users select a color profile at the top right of the editing panel before fine-tuning their shots with the various parameters available. Working with a film-mimicking color profile, right from the start, gives users the advantage of potentially dialing in a more nuanced celluloid look, faster, compared to presets alone.

Both are efficient options in your editing workflow, however, and combining them may be the missing piece to the aesthetic that either won’t provide. In addition to TAP, other analog-mimicking profiles include Kodachrome from Digistock and Chroma and Aero Infrared from The Digital Darkroom, among others.

Get to know the movie you want to imitate

This may seem like a no-brainer, but Stockel notes that this is a common mistake. To accurately recreate the look of film, you’ll ideally want to film first. If you don’t know how your favorite movie reacts in a given situation, it will be difficult to imitate it digitally or to know if you are on the right track. Although filming a movie requires an investment of time and money, familiarizing yourself with the stocks you want to work with can save you frustration in the long run.

“Understanding the process of working with a film lab and getting film scans that [you] it goes well with that,” he explains. “Another mistake I see is thinking that a specific film has a locked or preset look. In reality, there are so many variables that the photographer and the lab control that are actually responsible for that look.

the process of the archetype film presets fugue photography
Modified using The Archetype Process Kodak Tri-X Normal profile. Daniel Kim Photography

Tips for Editing Images to Look Like a Movie

When testing film, it’s important to make sure that the shooting conditions you’re experiencing match those you’ll likely be working in. the same way they would shoot a movie,” Stockel shares. “Specifically, shoot with the same amount and quality of light.”

Another thing he recommends is to understand that a filmstrip doesn’t have a predefined “look”. Depending on how it is shot, film stock can produce a wide range of results. TAP’s profiles are meant to give photographers leeway to achieve any of the various possible options. Applying a profile or preset will put you in the stage where you want to be, but then it’s up to you to dial in the settings to get the exact look you’re after.

the archetypal process wedding photography film presets
Modified using The Archetype Process Kodak Portra 400 +1 Normal Frontier profile. Daniel Kim Photography

The process 1, 2, 3

Often, Stockel will advise photographers on what he calls the “1, 2, 3 process”. The first step is vision. What are you trying to create? Once you have an idea, you can move on to the second step. Think about how you are going to record all the information needed to get the look. This includes cameras, lenses, location, light, and the exposure triangle, just to start.

When looking to emulate film in post-production, it’s best to capture raw files that contain as much exposure information as possible, which is why your exposure settings in step 2 are so important. When in doubt, Stockel recommends underexposing an image rather than overexposing it.

“I don’t think there’s anything unique to filming to emulate a movie that needs to be made,” Stockel says. “Just exposing right is still the best overall way to save the data needed to get the look you want.”

The final step is where profiles come into play. Now that you have a Raw photo with plenty of exposure data, it’s time to choose your profile, make your adjustments, and see your analog emulation vision through .

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Benfleet Photographer Reveals the Moment She Spotted Killer Whales https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/benfleet-photographer-reveals-the-moment-she-spotted-killer-whales/ Wed, 22 Jun 2022 11:35:19 +0000 https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/benfleet-photographer-reveals-the-moment-she-spotted-killer-whales/ A WILDLIFE photographer on an expedition off the famous John o’ Groats was reduced to tears after finally spotting a pair of killer whales. Footage shows Rosie Barrett, 25, collapsing after spotting several killer whales in Scottish coastal waters from the deck of a hastily booked ferry. Rosie back and forth orcas in the water, […]]]>

A WILDLIFE photographer on an expedition off the famous John o’ Groats was reduced to tears after finally spotting a pair of killer whales.

Footage shows Rosie Barrett, 25, collapsing after spotting several killer whales in Scottish coastal waters from the deck of a hastily booked ferry.

Rosie back and forth orcas in the water, only to capture her emotional reaction where she is seen tearing up.

She explained that she had been searching for orcas for FOUR days without success – so far – due to bad weather.

Rosie said: “We had had a lot of bad weather so I had about a week off.

“I decided to travel to John o’ Groats in the far north of Scotland to try and spot killer whales after hearing about many interesting sightings during the Orcawatch event.

“After four days I got a shout out from a Facebook group saying there were killer whales near where I was already filming seabirds for my YouTube channel.

“I ran over a cliff to join a crowd of people watching Orca at sea. I couldn’t believe they were there.

“I was messaging my colleague about the sighting and he suggested I try a ferry trip with John o’ Groats ferries.

“I ran to the ferry office and bought a ticket knowing it was a risk as the Orca could easily get out of the area quickly.

“I was the only passenger on the ferry as we picked up guests from Orkney on the other side.

“On the way I was looking for the large dorsal fins of the orca and after about fifteen minutes without sighting. I didn’t think this was going to happen.

“Suddenly, to the left of the ferry, I spotted two dorsal fins sticking out of the water and immediately waved to the skipper.

“He did everything so that I could take pictures of the Orca.

“He stopped the boat and we waited for them to come to us and we saw them appear several times before we had to leave.

“I was overwhelmed with excitement and emotion and wanted to document that through filming.

Echo:

“After taking pictures and sending them to my colleague, he managed to identify them as ‘Hulk’ and ‘Nott’ individuals, using the ‘Scottish Killer Whale Photo ID Catalogue’ which he co-authored .”

Rosie is a self-taught wildlife photographer and filmmaker, originally from Benfleet in Essex but now living in Gairloch in Scotland, where she also works for Hebridean Whale Cruises.

Her passion for documenting wildlife began six years ago and continues to this day as she continues to travel across the country capturing photos and videos of animals on land and in the sea.

She’s even been shortlisted for the Natural History Museum’s “Rising Star” award for 2022.

Rosie said: “I’ve always loved animals from a young age as I grew up with lots of people around me.

“My Nan has always been into her wildlife and that resonated with me too.

“Growing up watching David Attenborough and Deadly 60 documentaries, starring Steve Backshall, was also an important part of my journey in inspiring me to be who I am today.”

Rosie boasts of photographing animals such as deer, otters, kingfishers, seals, pine martens on land and even more in the sea including basking sharks, humpback whales and leatherback turtles.

She added, “I’ve been doing wildlife photography for about six years.

“It led me to pursue filmmaking and presenting, which I also want to delve into further in the years to come.

“Every year I sell calendars and animal prints, which I like to share with others.

“I want to inspire and educate others by sharing my images and films, which brings me so much joy and excitement.”

The UK is home to a small number of resident killer whales, which frequent the waters of northern Scotland.

“Orcas are usually found in UK waters. I wouldn’t say they’re rare, however, it’s not something you’ll see every day.

“We are incredibly lucky to have many different groups from overseas who are seasonal visitors and they are mainly around Shetlands, Orkney and the North Coast of Scotland.

“We also have the West Coast Community Pod with celebrity members ‘John Coe’ and ‘Aquarius’.

“At this time of year, there are certainly more frequent sightings, but it’s still something that can take some luck!”

Other footage captured by Rosie shows her on the ferry, where she sights more orcas, three days after the original video.

She added: “I was struggling with my mental health and needed to get out into nature.

“Nothing makes me feel better than when I’m surrounded by wildlife.

“I will never forget the moment I saw my first killer whale in 2018 with Basking Shark Scotland and I had dreamed of having that amazing feeling again as killer whales are such spectacular creatures to see in the wild.

“I was completely overwhelmed with emotion when I realized that hard work and persistence in overcoming mental health issues had led to seeing something so incredible.”

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Photographer captures stunning shot of eagles battling through the air https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/photographer-captures-stunning-shot-of-eagles-battling-through-the-air/ Mon, 20 Jun 2022 16:43:53 +0000 https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/photographer-captures-stunning-shot-of-eagles-battling-through-the-air/ There are images that a photographer can wait years to capture. This was the case for Portland enthusiast Rajiv Mongia, who waited patiently to snap a stunning photo of two eagles with their talons intertwined in the air. One of the birds flies upright while the other winged creature is mirrored, upside down. It looks […]]]>

There are images that a photographer can wait years to capture. This was the case for Portland enthusiast Rajiv Mongia, who waited patiently to snap a stunning photo of two eagles with their talons intertwined in the air. One of the birds flies upright while the other winged creature is mirrored, upside down. It looks like the upside-down bird is about to tumble from the sky, if not to be held there by the other.

Mongia began photographing wildlife after a trip to Patagonia in 2017. “I found it amazing trying to understand wildlife behavior, trying to capture that special ‘moment’ you see in photographs. amazing professionals,” he shares with My Modern Met. “I started training then and quickly learned how much planning, patience, knowledge of technical skills (light triangle, etc.) and sheer luck are needed to get the ” good shot “.”

The pandemic has propelled the Mongia practice forward. He used photography as a way to get out of the house, take pictures and recharge. While doing so, he started thinking about some specific shots he wanted to capture.

“One of them was the behavior of raptors such as bald eagles,” says Mongia. “In the NW Pacific it is amazing how common bald eagles have become again in the skies. eagles catching ducks/seabirds but I was never really able to get any nice pictures of them interacting with each other He had seen pictures (from other photographers) of the eagles flying as they closed their greenhouses, but he didn’t know when or where he could take such a picture.

Mongia finally had the opportunity to make this famous move. “I saw a series of workshops from an amazing photographer, Mark Smith,” he recalls. “[Mark] has the most epic eagle photos and was hoping I could learn some skills by taking his workshop in DC. [He] gave amazing tips on how the eagles have been doing over the past few days and what to look for when it’s about to have a great action.

After working on some technical aspects with Smith, Mongia spent around four hours shooting photos. “The scene was crazy at this location – there were 20-30 eagles, 10-20 great blue herons, crows and gulls – all flying around trying to catch the fish at this location. The action was constant – and we were all there at the studio shooting things were happening so fast you don’t know for sure what you caught and you don’t have time to review your footage as you go, because every time you look up, another eagle flies from a different direction.

Moniga took around 5,000 photos that day, and he wasn’t sure of the outcome. “I come home that night and start doing my quick pre-sorting of photos to see if I actually got anything different,” he shares. “There was a part where an eagle grabbed another and threw it in the water. DANG, missed that one. Another where there was action between two eagles – UGH, lack of focus on that one.

But then came that magic moment. “I came across this photo that I posted,” he continues. “I must have blinked for a second. Yes, it was a bit far (I had to crop a bit), but the action was perfect – two eagles locked talon and talon, each stretched. One with his mouth open in a scream and the other focused on the first.

It was the photo he had dreamed of for years, and with his passion for bird photography, it probably won’t be the last.

Rajiv Mongia is passionate about bird photography.

Bald Eagle Photography by Rajiv Mongia

Bald Eagle Photography by Rajiv MongiaBald Eagle Photography by Rajiv MongiaWild bird photo by Rajiv Mongia

As he waited years for the perfect shot of two bald eagles nested in the air, he took many more photos of fierce birds.

Bald Eagle Photography by Rajiv MongiaWild bird photo by Rajiv MongiaWild bird photo by Rajiv Mongia

Rajiv Mongia: Instagram

My Modern Met has granted permission to feature photos by Rajiv Mongia.

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Crow rides on the back of an unsuspecting eagle

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A Minnesota photographer chronicled a 1960s caravan from Singapore to Portugal https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/a-minnesota-photographer-chronicled-a-1960s-caravan-from-singapore-to-portugal/ Sun, 19 Jun 2022 01:11:03 +0000 https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/a-minnesota-photographer-chronicled-a-1960s-caravan-from-singapore-to-portugal/ The son of a lanky sheet metal worker from Northfield, Minnesota, Fran Hall came of age during the Great Depression and became the globetrotting chronicler of one of the most epic road trips of all time. Travel trailer company Airstream hired Hall in 1963 to shoot photos and film a 14-month trip through 31 countries […]]]>

The son of a lanky sheet metal worker from Northfield, Minnesota, Fran Hall came of age during the Great Depression and became the globetrotting chronicler of one of the most epic road trips of all time.

Travel trailer company Airstream hired Hall in 1963 to shoot photos and film a 14-month trip through 31 countries from Singapore to Portugal. A caravan of 50 gleaming silver trailers was to trek 35,000 miles overland.

The dizzying journey – with stops at Mount Everest, the Taj Mahal, Baghdad and Israel, the Parthenon in Athens and Moscow’s Red Square – came during tense times between the Cuban Missile Crisis and the escalation of the Vietnam War. Traveling with his wife, Tallie, Hall captured everything on film – from Cambodian temples to St. Basil’s Cathedral near the Kremlin. He called it “a journey of a million lives”.

“We were in Moscow for about a week and very quickly ran out of things to see,” Hall wrote in one of his many letters to legendary Northfield News reporter Maggie Lee. “We were followed everywhere.

Now, nearly 60 years after the trek, the Northfield Historical Society has invited a gathering of Airstreams to descend Thursday through Sunday on the southeastern Minnesota town in conjunction with a new exhibit, “Fran Hall: Tin Can Traveler “. The exhibit of Hall’s photos and letters opened in April and will run through December 2023.

“The photos are unique for the juxtaposition of modern inventions rolling past archaic ruins and regal architecture,” according to Airstream’s website. “The contrast was worth documenting – nothing like this had ever been done before.”

Born in 1914, Francis William Hall was the second of nine siblings who grew up on the River Cannon in Northfield. He spent a year each at nearby St. Olaf and Carleton colleges, but depression kept him from graduating, according to Lee.

After marrying Nathalia “Tallie” Rundhaug, the child of a minister at South High School in Minneapolis, Hall was working at the Art Floral store in Northfield when World War II broke out. The military rejected him because of a hernia, but that didn’t stop him from contributing to the war effort. Employed by Honeywell and trained at the University of Minnesota, Hall worked with precision bomb technology and taught military officers how to use cameras to locate targets.

After the war, Hall became an acclaimed nature photographer for the National Audubon Society and Disney, specializing in close-ups of insects. His infatuation with Airstreams began during a downpour while on assignment for Audubon in northern Wisconsin. While soaking wet in his tent, he noticed an Airstream nearby and decided he needed one.

He went to the Airstream factory in Ohio and struck a deal under which he would include footage from the trailers in his nature films in return for using one of them. .

The intercontinental trek began in 1963 when they sailed from Los Angeles to Japan and then flew to Singapore. The authorities in Burma, now Myanmar, could not guarantee their safety, so the caravan split up on the way to Calcutta. Some flew in while others sailed to India, “one of the strangest countries we would be in… [and] probably the most exciting,” Fran wrote.

According to research by Cathy Osterman and Travis Farrington of the Northfield Historical Society, driving the treacherous switchbacks of the Khyber Pass en route from Pakistan to Afghanistan was risky for the Halls. Ignoring orders not to stop at the top of the pass, Hall got out to take pictures. On the way down, he collided with an Afghan car and authorities seized his passport, but the US consul intervened and the Halls were allowed to travel to Iran.

After visiting the Dead Sea and other sites in the Middle East, they came across three bodies in Damascus, Syria, of people who had been hanged by the Baathist regime. “It freaked me out,” Hall wrote.

They meandered through Turkey and Poland, took saunas in Finland and traveled to Hamburg and Paris before ending the journey in Portugal. After flying to Miami, they traveled to Los Angeles to complete their world tour, picked up the car they had left there, and returned home to Northfield.

Tallie died in 1983 at age 65, but Fran was thrilled to have taken the big trip 20 years before – a trip he called “a wonderful thing that very few people experience”.

Hall moved to Boulder, Colorado, where he used the wood he collected on his travels to create inlaid bowls and photographed sunsets and wildlife. Shortly before his death in 2010, two weeks before he turned 96, he wrote a final letter to Lee, saying, “My life has been fascinating all along.”

Curt Brown’s Tales of Minnesota History appear every Sunday. Readers can send him ideas and suggestions at mnhistory@startribune.com. His latest book looks at Minnesota in 1918, when flu, war, and fires converged: strib.mn/MN1918.

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Prince Charles whispers ‘lucky tree’ at every royal planting, photographer reveals https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/prince-charles-whispers-lucky-tree-at-every-royal-planting-photographer-reveals/ Thu, 16 Jun 2022 21:59:31 +0000 https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/prince-charles-whispers-lucky-tree-at-every-royal-planting-photographer-reveals/ Royal photographer Tim Rooke talked about snapping photos of the famous family and revealed a quirky treat: Prince Charles shares a message with the trees at every royal planting. Rooke, Rex by Shutterstock’s royal photographer, explained how he had the opportunity to photograph Prince Charles during tree planting during an interview with vanity lounge. He […]]]>

Royal photographer Tim Rooke talked about snapping photos of the famous family and revealed a quirky treat: Prince Charles shares a message with the trees at every royal planting.

Rooke, Rex by Shutterstock’s royal photographer, explained how he had the opportunity to photograph Prince Charles during tree planting during an interview with vanity lounge.

He acknowledged that while the Prince of Wales’ new staff members weren’t expecting it at first, Prince Charles has a certain ritual when it comes to planting a tree in the ground.

“The Prince of Wales has quite a peculiar way of planting trees,” Rooke said. “Every time he gets a new member of staff, we tell them what he’s going to do, and they say ‘oh no, he won’t do that’.”

However, according to Rooke, after Prince Charles plants a tree, he says, “Good luck, tree.”

The prince has been heavily involved with the Queen’s Green Canopy, which had encouraged people to ‘plant a tree’ in honor of the Queen’s Jubilee celebration which took place earlier this month.

In May, he unveiled 70 ancient forests and 70 ancient trees dedicated to the Queen.

Rooke also said vanity lounge that in addition to photographing Prince Charles’ involvement in tree planting, he captured the royal as he held his grandson, Prince Louis, in his lap.

“I thought it was good, because he’s just a grandfather, right?” he said. “You kind of forget that these people are just normal… Well, they obviously aren’t normal people. But they are people, with their grandchildren and their great-grandchildren.

Regarding how he works with the royal family, he noted that he and other photographers have a “symbiotic” relationship with them.

Rooke also spoke about the importance of “doing the work” as the goal is to get “good photos” for promotional purposes, which he said the family understands.

“We have to take pictures, and if we take good pictures – if they allow us to take good pictures – of their charity work, those pictures will be used in newspapers and magazines, and that will promote the charity. “, he continued. “If they were all grumpy all the time, it wouldn’t really work. I think it’s understood that we all have a job to do.

Although he acknowledges that his job can be difficult, Rooke still expressed how pleased he is with the progress of his career, as he has taken a different path than his grandfather, who was a miner based in Canada.

“I hope the monarchy continues, and not just for selfish reasons,” he joked. “Yeah. I’m probably 15 [working] years, so I’m sure it will last longer than that.

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Photographer recreates 1918 photo to show 100 years of glacial retreat https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/photographer-recreates-1918-photo-to-show-100-years-of-glacial-retreat/ Wed, 15 Jun 2022 09:04:52 +0000 https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/photographer-recreates-1918-photo-to-show-100-years-of-glacial-retreat/ The photographer recreated a 1918 photo of the glacier. A photographer has recreated a 1918 photo of a glacier to highlight how much it has disappeared over the past century. In a viral post on Reddit, photographer Neil Drake shared a photo he took that shows how the Blomstrandbreen glacier, located in a bay on […]]]>

The photographer recreated a 1918 photo of the glacier.

A photographer has recreated a 1918 photo of a glacier to highlight how much it has disappeared over the past century.

In a viral post on Reddit, photographer Neil Drake shared a photo he took that shows how the Blomstrandbreen glacier, located in a bay on Svalbard, an island in the far north of Norway, s is removed. Mr Drake also shared another photograph taken around the same time of year in 1918.

Talk to NewsweekDrake explained that in the original photo, you can tell it’s summer because it’s daytime and in winter it’s total darkness in the Arctic. “Secondly, the fjords are frozen almost all year round. You can only access them by boat in the summer when the sea ice is melting. Thirdly, the mountain peaks in the original photo have no snow on them, which would only be the case during the height of the hottest summer months.” he said.

Read also | New study reveals how marine viruses can help mitigate climate change

Mr Drake added that the comparison between the two images of the Blomstrandbreen Glacier is one of the most dramatic he has ever seen. “I knew I was part of something bigger than just taking a picture. It was part of making sure people had these important conversations about how we’re impacting the climate,” he told the media.

Additionally, the photographer said the photos were meant to make people feel uncomfortable. He noted that some of the comments on Reddit said the post had “ruined” their day. “That’s why I posted it. To make people think ‘Okay, maybe this stuff on climate change gets read,'” Mr Drake added.

According Newsweek, rising temperatures due to greenhouse gas emissions are causing sea ice and glaciers around the world to retreat at an unprecedented rate. Arctic sea ice is melting at a rate of nearly 13% every decade, and the oldest and thickest ice in the Arctic has also shrunk by 95% over the past 30 years.

Read also | Mothers bear the brunt of climate change in Pakistan’s hottest city

Quoting the World Wide Fund for Nature, the outlet reported that if emissions continue to rise unchecked, the Arctic could be ice-free by 2040, which could lead to real-world consequences such as sea level rise. of the sea, flooding in coastal communities and the extinction of animals. Humans could also be affected by food shortages, heat waves and increasingly unpredictable weather patterns.

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Grainery is a new Instagram-inspired app for film photographers https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/grainery-is-a-new-instagram-inspired-app-for-film-photographers/ Mon, 13 Jun 2022 16:55:47 +0000 https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/grainery-is-a-new-instagram-inspired-app-for-film-photographers/ Grainery is a new photo sharing app designed for film photography enthusiasts. Its beta version is now available and will soon be launched on iOS and Android. The app’s layout will be familiar to Instagram users, with photos displayed much like Meta’s photo-sharing site. Things like follower suggestions, direct messaging, explore page, notifications, and even […]]]>

Grainery is a new photo sharing app designed for film photography enthusiasts. Its beta version is now available and will soon be launched on iOS and Android.

The app’s layout will be familiar to Instagram users, with photos displayed much like Meta’s photo-sharing site. Things like follower suggestions, direct messaging, explore page, notifications, and even fonts are surprisingly similar to Instagram.

But unlike Instagram, details relevant to film photography are present, such as the type of film used, the analog camera body and the lens model.

Grainery is a new photography app for filmmakers to share their work

Grainery is a new photography app for filmmakers to share their work

“Grainery is a place for film photographers to share, learn and collaborate. The hope is that everything feels familiar, but with a few more analog-specific features to get the most out of your experience,” says Grainery.

Users will be prompted to complete the gear section on their profile page and will not be able to post until they have added at least one camera, lens, and film to their profile.

Grainery is a new photography app for filmmakers to share their work

Grainery is a new photography app for filmmakers to share their work

When posting an image, the user can add standard details such as caption, location, and hashtags. It also allows users to indicate the exposure value and tell if the film was pushed or pulled during development and by how many stops. If the user had a different movie in their camera than the one in their profile, they can also change that.

Once a photo has been posted, app users can find an image by searching for a specific camera, lens or film. For example, if someone wants to see photos taken with a Hasselblad 500C/M, they can search for it by first typing an exclamation mark followed by Hasselblad 500C/M where all posts tagged with that camera will be displayed .

Grainery is a new photography app for filmmakers to share their work

Application is at a very early stage

Grainery appears to have been developed by a single person, who yesterday wrote on the app’s Instagram account that “mobile apps could be done by the end of next week. I started this project three weeks ago, crazy to think.

Although the app is in a nascent stage, users are already posting movie photos on the app from all over the world. Film photography is showing something of a resurgence with film makers launching new 35mm rolls and a resurgence in mainstream interest.

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Kidnappers recover N.3m, release photographer Ebonyi, friend’s mother-in-law https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/kidnappers-recover-n-3m-release-photographer-ebonyi-friends-mother-in-law/ Sun, 12 Jun 2022 00:51:51 +0000 https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/kidnappers-recover-n-3m-release-photographer-ebonyi-friends-mother-in-law/ Mr. Uchenna Nwube, the Ebonyi State government house photographer, has regained his freedom after three days in the kidnappers’ den. Nwube was abducted at around 7 p.m. on Wednesday on the Okigwe-Aba-Enugu highway. He was abducted in the area, while returning to Abakaliki, Ebonyi State, from Aba, Abia State. His neighbor and family friend Mr […]]]>

Mr. Uchenna Nwube, the Ebonyi State government house photographer, has regained his freedom after three days in the kidnappers’ den.

Nwube was abducted at around 7 p.m. on Wednesday on the Okigwe-Aba-Enugu highway.

He was abducted in the area, while returning to Abakaliki, Ebonyi State, from Aba, Abia State.

His neighbor and family friend Mr Simion Ituma told News Agency of Nigeria that Nwube was released on Saturday.

Ituma explained that the victim regained his freedom alongside his friend’s mother-in-law, who was with him.

He said: “Yes he has been released but at the moment he is at Ogwu Police Station in Awgu Local Government Area of ​​Enugu State.

“He was taken to the police station to accommodate him with the Nigeria Police officers. You know his car was taken to the police after he was kidnapped.

“I must tell you that he is free and healthy, as is his friend’s mother-in-law. Thank God for everything.

The photographer, we learned, had issued a distress call to his colleague to confirm his abduction after being ordered to do so by his captors.

He reportedly said the kidnappers were asking for 50 million naira for his release.

A friend of the photographer, who spoke on condition of anonymity, told our correspondent that Nwube was released early on Saturday by his captors after his family and friends paid a ransom of 300,000 naira.

“Yes, Mr. Nwube has been released. Thank God. The kidnappers collected 300,000 naira for his release. Let’s give thanks to God,” the source said.

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Hubble photographs a galactic tail 260,000 light years long https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/hubble-photographs-a-galactic-tail-260000-light-years-long/ Fri, 10 Jun 2022 06:50:01 +0000 https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/hubble-photographs-a-galactic-tail-260000-light-years-long/ NASA took to its Hubble Space Telescope Twitter account to tease upcoming research to be conducted by the James Webb Space Telescope. NASA explains in the above post that its Hubble Space Telescope took a picture of the galaxy ESO 137-001, which resides in the constellation of the Southern Triangle and the Abell 3627 cluster. […]]]>

NASA took to its Hubble Space Telescope Twitter account to tease upcoming research to be conducted by the James Webb Space Telescope.

NASA explains in the above post that its Hubble Space Telescope took a picture of the galaxy ESO 137-001, which resides in the constellation of the Southern Triangle and the Abell 3627 cluster. NASA explains that ESO 137 -001 slowly sinks into a galaxy cluster that rids it of hot gases, creating a galactic tail that spans some 260,000 light-years.

Notably, when viewed in visible light, the galaxy looks like a “astonished” with large blue ribbons of young stars forming the legs of the aquatic animal. In addition, NASA explains that once Webb is fully calibrated and operational, the Next Generation Space Telescope will be pointed at ESO 137-001 to study this strange galaxy and how stars form in the galactic tail. Read more about this galaxy from NASA check out this link here.

Jak Connor

Jak Connor

Jak joined the TweakTown team in 2017 and has since reviewed hundreds of new tech products and kept us up to date with the latest science and space news daily. Jak’s love of science, space and technology, and specifically PC gaming, began when he was 10 years old. It was the day his dad showed him how to play Age of Empires on an old Compaq PC. From that day on, Jak fell in love with games and the advancement of the tech industry in all its forms. Instead of a typical FPS, Jak holds a very special place in his heart for RTS games.

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Anthony Vaccarello, creative director of Saint Laurent, uses unorthodox photographers for new pop-up exhibitions around the world https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/anthony-vaccarello-creative-director-of-saint-laurent-uses-unorthodox-photographers-for-new-pop-up-exhibitions-around-the-world/ Wed, 08 Jun 2022 16:14:50 +0000 https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/anthony-vaccarello-creative-director-of-saint-laurent-uses-unorthodox-photographers-for-new-pop-up-exhibitions-around-the-world/ Launched in 2018, Self is Saint Laurent’s collaborative artistic initiative curated by its creative director, Anthony Vaccarello. For the seventh iteration of the series, which makes its world debut this week, Vaccarello tapped six different photographers, none of whom work in mainstream fashion, and asked them to place his summer 2022 collection in the context […]]]>

Launched in 2018, Self is Saint Laurent’s collaborative artistic initiative curated by its creative director, Anthony Vaccarello. For the seventh iteration of the series, which makes its world debut this week, Vaccarello tapped six different photographers, none of whom work in mainstream fashion, and asked them to place his summer 2022 collection in the context of their individual artistic vision.

It takes both confidence and a high-caliber collaborator for a creative director to successfully let go of the reins, and Vaccarello’s top-notch talent pool certainly delivered. Reunited image makers include Alex Webb, Harry Gruyaert and Olivia Arthur, all members of the famed Magnum Photos collective, as well as Takashi Homma, Daesung Lee and the duo Birdhead, all of whom typically work in the fine art field.

From June 9-12, each artist will have their own temporary outdoor exhibition in one of six cities – New York, Paris, London, Tokyo, Seoul and Shanghai, respectively – where they will show a mix of their new commissions with a selection of their vintage work. (A very limited quantity of each edition will be available for pre-order for purchase, on-site only.) The result is decidedly not an advertising campaign, but it definitely blurs the lines between fine art and fashion. Time, context and setting are further obscured by displaying new and old images side by side in a city that has nothing to do with the photos. These overlapping juxtapositions, designed to provide pause, are what make this such a complex and touching hybrid. On a much simpler level, pop-ups will provide an evocative backdrop to discerning passers-by.

Since its creation, Self was an ambitious project, mainly focused on film and photography. Previous collaborators include Vanessa Beecroft, Bret Easton Ellis and Gaspar Noé. A Self 07 standout is Magnum photographer Alex Webb.

Known for his singular sense of color and graphic style, Webb captures frozen moments that are both grand and intimate. Seventeen new images will be on display alongside some of his earlier work in New York’s Madison Square Park. Before the opening of the exhibition on June 9, we spoke with him about his approach to the project.

Say it with balloons: Alex Webb’s vision of LA, 2022. Courtesy of Saint Laurent.

How did this project start?

I was in Los Angeles a few months ago and was very intrigued by the neighborhoods on the southern outskirts of downtown. The flower district and the piñata district seemed particularly intriguing. In many ways they reminded me of parts of Mexico; they look quite Hispanic, with bright colors. Much of my photographic life has taken place in the Caribbean and Latin America, particularly Mexico. So I thought it would be an interesting place to do it. I also thought of Venice Beach, but found that area to be more evocative and intriguing. Venice has been extensively photographed.

I’ve never heard of the piñata district!

Most people don’t know this, but it’s quite surprising that you come down to this area and it’s all Mexican decorations.

Basically what I decided to do is create a kind of visual conversation between some of my Latin American and Caribbean photography and these new Saint Laurent images. These photos are certainly stylish – they’re wearing Saint Laurent clothes – but I tried to channel some of the spirit of what I did for many years in Latin America, sort of dealing with similar moments, similar lights.

How did you go about casting the models?

I worked with a stylist, Avena Gallagher, and we went through a bunch of casting sheets and so on, and between us we kind of decided which people we thought were interesting.

I’ve worked with her before about four years ago, and I actually asked her for this particular shoot when I was asked to do it. We are getting along very well.

Are you a fan of fashion photography?

I am not actively into fashion photography. When I was asked to do a fashion shoot, it’s because they want something that resembles what I do on the street, they want the vibe of the street. They want the same sense of moment and the same sense of light that I tend to work in.

Alex Webb's unique perspective on LA.  Courtesy of Saint-Laurent.

A view of LA by Alex Webb, 2022. Courtesy of Saint Laurent.

There’s a real textural play in the environment, for example, the glowing glow of a car against rough brickwork.

I am truly an environmental photographer. I am intrigued by how people exist in their environment. I went out and looked for places that seemed evocative where I could take the models and try to do something. Often it had to do with a sense of color. Sometimes there is a shiny yellow wall. Other times there’s a place where you see people in deep space, it’s quite interesting. But you know, basically, it was very important for me to find places to put these models.

I think there is also an element of mystery in these images. There is a story, but the viewer does not know what it is and it is up to them to decide. Did you have a story in mind?

No, it’s really more the feel of each individual situation. I tried to channel the spirit of my street work, which often has a somewhat enigmatic note.

Cotton candy, Oaxaca, Mexico, 1990 by Alex Webb.  Courtesy of Magnum.

Alex Webb, Cotton candy, Oaxaca, Mexico, 1990. Courtesy of Magnum Photos.

What was it like working with other people? Fashion is a multi-cog machine. Your job looks like you are on a single player mission.

In countries where I don’t speak the language, maybe I work with a fixer or something, but most of the time I work alone. I wander and let the rhythms of the streets and my experiences lead me where I will go. So clearly, doing a fashion shoot is a totally different kind of thing.

But in the context of the fashion shoot, I try to put things in place so that there is a possibility of surprise. Not everything is scripted. I will make models come and go, but I don’t direct them. I will wait for what will appear as a moment in the street. It is not a rigid situation.

Webb stumbled upon this butterfly decoration while on a reconnaissance.  Courtesy of Saint-Laurent.

Webb stumbled upon this butterfly decoration while scouting and incorporated it into this photo, 2022. Courtesy of Saint Laurent.

It really shows. It’s very un-lay-y. Fashion seems to be an organic component of a slice of life.

I think that’s what they wanted from me and what they were looking for. It’s quite fluid. There’s a fair amount of serendipity to the process, even in the context of a fashion shoot.

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