Photographer – David Hemmings Bird Photography http://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/ Wed, 23 Nov 2022 18:51:39 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-2021-06-25T155134.587.png Photographer – David Hemmings Bird Photography http://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/ 32 32 San Francisco sends more police to marina after photographer robbed https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/san-francisco-sends-more-police-to-marina-after-photographer-robbed/ Wed, 23 Nov 2022 17:33:13 +0000 https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/san-francisco-sends-more-police-to-marina-after-photographer-robbed/ San Francisco will send more police to the Marina district in response to the high-profile armed robbery of a photographer at the Palace of Fine Arts last week. In a press release, the area’s district supervisor, Catherine Stefani, said she had decided to increase the police presence in the area after what she describes as […]]]>

San Francisco will send more police to the Marina district in response to the high-profile armed robbery of a photographer at the Palace of Fine Arts last week.

In a press release, the area’s district supervisor, Catherine Stefani, said she had decided to increase the police presence in the area after what she describes as a “horrible armed robbery” of a wedding photographer. Stefani worked with the San Francisco Police Department (SFPD) to add new patrol units to the Palace of Fine Arts with SFPD Community Ambassadors who will fill the district’s commercial hallways with a $300,000 budget allocation.

“My number one priority as District 2 Supervisor is keeping residents and visitors safe and ensuring small businesses can thrive,” Stefani says. “Every day I hear from San Franciscans who are concerned about crime in our city, and I take this issue very seriously.”

SFPD leader Bill Scott says he is aware of recent high-profile thefts around San Francisco’s various popular destinations and says the public expects to see an increased police presence in and around the Palace of Fine Arts. Arts, Fillmore, Pacific Hights, Union Street, and what he describes as other high-traffic, densely populated residential areas, tourist destinations, and commercial corridors.

“Whether you come here to shop, dine, or visit one of our many historic landmarks, we are committed to keeping everyone in San Francisco safe,” added Chef Scott.

Neither Supervisor Stefani nor Chief Scott provided details on the number or frequency of the increased patrols.

San Francisco has been at the center of violence against photographers for several years, as there have been several documented incidents of muggings and robberies in and around the city for years. Most have not elicited as strong a public response as that given by the SFPD leader and district supervisor during last week’s armed assault on a visiting wedding photographer, likely because stories like this these have been reported in photography circles and here on PetaPixelthey had avoided wider national coverage.

That changed last week, and San Francisco now faces intense scrutiny over how it intends to deal with the escalating situation in the future, as thieves become more brazen than ever in their public attacks. .


Picture credits: Header photo licensed via Depositphotos.

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Team Mike: A Popular Photographer Fights Cancer | New https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/team-mike-a-popular-photographer-fights-cancer-new/ Fri, 18 Nov 2022 10:00:00 +0000 https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/team-mike-a-popular-photographer-fights-cancer-new/ Determination. Struggle. The will to never give up. These are the things on Mike Cyrus’ mind. Cyrus, a former racing driver, Toyota team member and most recently a photographer, has been battling cancer for over two years now. Suffering from stomach cancer, Cyrus had to have his stomach removed. “It enveloped the entire lining of […]]]>

Determination. Struggle. The will to never give up. These are the things on Mike Cyrus’ mind.

Cyrus, a former racing driver, Toyota team member and most recently a photographer, has been battling cancer for over two years now.


Kentucky design and steelmaker to invest $18.5 million in Indiana

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Queen ‘didn’t like her hands’, reveals royal photographer https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/queen-didnt-like-her-hands-reveals-royal-photographer/ Tue, 15 Nov 2022 10:07:08 +0000 https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/queen-didnt-like-her-hands-reveals-royal-photographer/ A British photographer has revealed Queen Elizabeth II once told him she ‘didn’t like her hands’. Rankin, who photographed the late Queen ahead of her Golden Jubilee in 2022, said a “surge of empowerment” washed over him when he met Her Majesty for the photo. “Of course she came in and this wave of empowerment […]]]>

A British photographer has revealed Queen Elizabeth II once told him she ‘didn’t like her hands’.

Rankin, who photographed the late Queen ahead of her Golden Jubilee in 2022, said a “surge of empowerment” washed over him when he met Her Majesty for the photo.

“Of course she came in and this wave of empowerment washes over you,” Rankin, 56, told the Tea with Twiggy podcast.

“I never felt that aura and she was so funny as soon as she walked in. I was like, ‘I really want to photograph you holding the sword,’ and she said, ‘I don’t like my hands.’ [I thought] this is the best “exit” to hold the sword.

“I’m probably not supposed to say that, but what I loved about her is that she’s so smart and everything she said in response had this amazing twist. It was just really, really brilliant. I loved it – I spent five minutes with her, so I don’t know her intimately.

Rankin added that before filming he saw the Queen “laughing and joking” with a footman.

“I was in the throne room and she was walking down that hallway and I could see her walking with the footman. They were both laughing, bursting into laughter, and I was like, “That’s what I want.” So it was in my head all the time,” he explained.

“I got a really amazing note where the curator said my picture of her was one of their favorites – which I think means the Palace’s favorite – because she’s really laughing in my picture. “

Rankin’s photo shows the Queen wearing bright pink lipstick in front of a Union Jack. He was one of 10 photographers invited to take the Queen’s Jubilee photo that year.

In an interview at the time, he said, “She has a great sense of humor, and she took the mickey away from me. . . The sync wire fell off my camera and she started smiling and joking. She said, ‘Oh, you have a lot of equipment, don’t you?’ »

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10 tips for great portrait photography at your local park https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/10-tips-for-great-portrait-photography-at-your-local-park/ Sat, 12 Nov 2022 07:30:58 +0000 https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/10-tips-for-great-portrait-photography-at-your-local-park/ Portrait photography is a fantastic way to hone both your camera and social skills, and lets you experiment with both studio flash and natural light. It can seem like a dark art though, how do you light your subject, get the best poses out of it, and what kit should you use? This month, we […]]]>

Portrait photography is a fantastic way to hone both your camera and social skills, and lets you experiment with both studio flash and natural light. It can seem like a dark art though, how do you light your subject, get the best poses out of it, and what kit should you use?

This month, we aim to answer all of these questions and more! We’ve teamed up with a PhotoPlus reader: The Canon Magazine (opens in a new tab)Carole Stevens, for a portrait masterclass with portrait professional Rebecca Faith at her local park in the beautiful, picturesque city of Bath, England.

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Moment TikTok Photographer Realizes He’s Lost Couple’s Wedding Photos https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/moment-tiktok-photographer-realizes-hes-lost-couples-wedding-photos/ Wed, 09 Nov 2022 12:17:23 +0000 https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/moment-tiktok-photographer-realizes-hes-lost-couples-wedding-photos/ Your wedding day is supposed to be the best day of your life and the one you will never forget. Well, a couple will really have to rely on their memories after photos from their special day are tragically lost. Their photographer Justin Gummow recounted the moment he realized his work had been deleted in […]]]>

Your wedding day is supposed to be the best day of your life and the one you will never forget.

Well, a couple will really have to rely on their memories after photos from their special day are tragically lost.

Their photographer Justin Gummow recounted the moment he realized his work had been deleted in a video confession to TikTok.

In the clip, which racked up more than 13.9 million views and 2 million likes in just three days, a moody Gummow tells viewers, “The worst thing that can happen to a photographer while shooting a wedding m ‘has arrived.

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“I was transferring the photos and the card got corrupted and I lost all the photos.”

He then turns the camera to his computer screen, showing a colorful hodgepodge, and explains: “Almost every one of [the photos] looked like this.”

Gummow revealed the extent of the damage in photosjustinshootscanon/TikTok

Naturally, Gummow panicked and “bought a bunch of programs to try to restore the card.”

But still, the photos were unrecoverable.

Admitting to having shed a few tears, he says he then resigned himself to calling the bride and telling her “all those memories of her day that she paid a professional photographer to take are gone.

“And it cracked.”

He continues: “I called her and I said to her and I said, ‘Hey, I’m trying my best and I’ve already spent hundreds of dollars trying to fix these photos and get them back, I can reimburse you, I will take photos for you and your husband. Wherever you want to go, we can go do portraits.

But, he adds, the fact is his equipment was faulty and, quite simply, “S*** happens sometimes.” Still, he acknowledges: “That’s no excuse, and that’s not OK, and I’m 100% responsible for that.”

However, this particular cloud ultimately had a semi-silver lining, Gummow continues.

Looking at the screen on the back of his camera, he could still see the photos and “they didn’t look that bad.” He says some still looked “a bit messed up” but he could see “the vast majority”.

“So I used my camera’s wifi to transfer the JPEG previews from the camera to my phone and so slowly I transferred all the photos I could to my phone and saved a lot of them,” did he declare. said.

The point of his story, Gummow explains, was that all was not lost in the end, and he hopes his ordeal might help someone else in a similar “shitty situation.” Plus, he “learned a lot of lessons” in the process.

Fellow TikTokers flocked to offer their admiration and support, or to share their own stories of woe.

“It happened to us, our photographer’s insurance paid to take over the wedding. Paid to rehire tuxedos and stuff,” one wrote.

“Happened to me in 2018. Had a stomach ache for weeks looking for a solution. Relieved to hear you found one,” another commented.

“It’s happened to me more than once. A couple [of] months ago my BOTH cards got corrupted in the same session. [I] spent a cargo and collected a card. it’s honestly the worst feeling,” said a third.

A number of viewers said they would hire Gummow in a heartbeat because of his dedication and integrity.

“Hearing all this makes me want to hire you. You really really care and have tried everything to fix it and fix it. Some people would just lie,” one said.

“I wish I had a photographer like you. Responsibility means a lot,” added a second

“In all honesty, I wouldn’t ask for a refund if you told me all of this, I would just ask you to do your best and if all else fails, plan a recovery,” another wrote.

Gummow didn’t reveal the couple’s reaction, but he did say telling the bride was “the worst thing.”

Give your opinion on our topical democracy. Click the upvote icon at the top of the page to help push this article up the indy100 rankings.

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German photographer Benjamin Pfau experiments with technology and ingrained stereotypes to create a false narrative https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/german-photographer-benjamin-pfau-experiments-with-technology-and-ingrained-stereotypes-to-create-a-false-narrative/ Mon, 07 Nov 2022 01:01:51 +0000 https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/german-photographer-benjamin-pfau-experiments-with-technology-and-ingrained-stereotypes-to-create-a-false-narrative/ If the artist hadn’t told us, we would have thought he was really in Rio de Janeiro taking pictures for this project. Knowing that he has never been there challenges the viewer to search for revealing details in images retrieved from the internet and then processed by an algorithm. It’s a game that makes us […]]]>

If the artist hadn’t told us, we would have thought he was really in Rio de Janeiro taking pictures for this project. Knowing that he has never been there challenges the viewer to search for revealing details in images retrieved from the internet and then processed by an algorithm. It’s a game that makes us question the patterns of our gaze, as well as a reminder that the next time we see constructed images, we might believe they’re real.

Rio de Janeiro is often called Cidade Maravilhosa – the marvelous city. A fitting name, as it has captured the imagination of people all over the world.

And it’s a place I’ve never visited in person. The marvelous city displayed here is a product of the Internet. All photographs in this series are artifacts extracted from on-demand cloud services that were available to me during the second COVID-19 pandemic lockdown in Germany in winter 2020/2021. These services include Google Maps, Google Street View, various video streaming providers and social media platforms such as Facebook and Instagram, and StyleGAN2, an algorithm that enables data-driven, unconditional generative image modeling. The majority of portraits in this series are either produced or edited using cloud-based generative facial modeling.

Applying a plating we are used to through the traditional practice of documentary photography, the images are taken out of their original context and presented as a personal essay aimed at investigating the truthfulness and general mechanics of the photographic essay to now and for what is to come.

Words and pictures of Benjamin Pfau

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Benjamin Pfau is a German photographer. He explores themes of alienation and isolation by creating expansive photojournals, which are often juxtaposed with poetry and other forms of writing. In recent years his interest has shifted to dissecting the digital landscape and studying generative image modeling. Follow him on instagram and PhMuseum.

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This feature is part of Story of the Week, a handpicked selection of relevant projects from our community by curators at the PhMuseum.

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Photographer on a new cloud | www.oamarumail.co.nz https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/photographer-on-a-new-cloud-www-oamarumail-co-nz/ Fri, 04 Nov 2022 01:55:14 +0000 https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/photographer-on-a-new-cloud-www-oamarumail-co-nz/ Top shot. . . Emma Willetts’ bird’s eye view of Oamaru Shingle Supplies won second prize in the New Zealand Geographic Photographer of the Year competition, in the aerial category. PHOTO: SUPPLIED/EMMA WILLETTS Emma Willetts of North Otago is at the top, after another accolade for her aerial photography. Ms Willetts has just returned from […]]]>

Top shot. . . Emma Willetts’ bird’s eye view of Oamaru Shingle Supplies won second prize in the New Zealand Geographic Photographer of the Year competition, in the aerial category. PHOTO: SUPPLIED/EMMA WILLETTS

Emma Willetts of North Otago is at the top, after another accolade for her aerial photography.

Ms Willetts has just returned from Auckland, where the 2022 New Zealand Geographic Photographer of the Year awards took place over the weekend. She finished second in the aerial category.

“I was actually really, really shocked. I did not expect to receive anything this year. . . Because it was such an unconventional image. Not, like, a pretty picture per se, but either way, it was pretty cool.

The featured photo looked at Oamaru Shingle Supplies and was taken last year on an early morning Cessna flight with North Otago pilot and dairy farmer Hayden Williams, with whom Ms Willetts flew regularly.

“That flight, we were on our way to the west coast that day, doing some pictures there, and I had flown over the quarry a couple of times and I was like ‘mmm, that would be pretty cool to photograph’ , and that morning the light was really good, so I just asked him if he could do some curls,” she said.

Ms Willetts had won the same category in 2020, her first year to enter the competition, with a photo of oystercatchers dotting Awaroa Bay in Marlborough.

She was also a finalist last year, but was not ranked.

Shocked . . . Oamaru photographer Emma Willetts did it
don’t expect his “unconventional” photo to win an award.
PHOTO: PROVIDED

”I usually enter about 10 to 12 [photos] every year and I always do the aerial category. There are other categories, but I stick to what I know.

Ms Willetts’ snap was one of 55 selected for the final, from over 6,000 entries.

First place in the aerial category went to Nelson’s photographer Andy MacDonald, who was also named General Photographer of the Year.

Ms Willetts said hers was the only photo from the aerial category final not taken by drone.

”I’m proud of the fact that I get up and fly. I love to fly, so it’s always nice to be recognized for that. And it was an image of Oamaru, so I was really excited about that. ”

She and her fiancé, Riverstone Kitchen owner Bevan Smith, decided to go to the awards night “a few weeks ago,” she said.

”We were like ‘why not?’. It’s so good to go out and be among other creative people and socialize, and obviously for Bevan, it’s really nice to discover some restaurants.”

Ms Willetts said she absolutely wanted to be back in the air as soon as she could.

“I think I need to take more footage of the Waitaki area, and I feel inspired to go back there.”

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Coady Photography, 60 years of excellence https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/coady-photography-60-years-of-excellence/ Mon, 31 Oct 2022 23:39:40 +0000 https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/coady-photography-60-years-of-excellence/ The Coady clan with full camera gear at Keeneland. Photo courtesy of the Coady family The company founded by Jack Coady, Sr., in 1962 celebrates 60 years of capturing the splendor of horse racing By Maribeth Kalinitch Little did Jack Coady, Sr., know when he moved from Chicago to Arizona in the late 1950s that […]]]>

The Coady clan with full camera gear at Keeneland. Photo courtesy of the Coady family

The company founded by Jack Coady, Sr., in 1962 celebrates 60 years of capturing the splendor of horse racing

By Maribeth Kalinitch

Little did Jack Coady, Sr., know when he moved from Chicago to Arizona in the late 1950s that he was about to create a legacy that would continue into his 60th year.

After working as a funeral director in Chicago, Coady, Sr., decided to try his hand at photography in which he had both an interest and an aptitude.

As there is synchronicity in the world, in 1954 Phoenix visionary Walter Cluer dreamed of building a world-class racing facility on 1400 acres of land he had just purchased from 19th Avenue and Bell. That dream came true on January 7, 1956, when Turf Paradise opened its doors, becoming one of Arizona’s first sports franchises.

Coady, Sr., whose interests also included horse racing, got a job as a photographer for the Arizona Republic in 1962. One of his first assignments was to film the races at Turf Paradise. Eventually, Turf Paradise invited Jack, Sr., to be their trail photographer and a family business was born.

Jack, Sr. and his son Jeff traveled to Stampede Park in Canada where Shawn and his brothers were born. “We have dual nationality,” Shawn said in an interview with Jim Wells, editor for Cantebury Park.

What was a twist of fate turned into a family affair when sons Jack, Jr. and Jeff joined in the business expansion. The younger Coadys took photos of the winner’s circle and managed the timing of the race. They provided video services to other small tracks in the Southwest as the business grew.

In turn, Jeff’s sons Shawn, who started with his father at 14, and Kevin and Kurtis, the latter twins, had all joined the family business in the 1990s as it transformed and grew. flourished, and digital technology came into play.

While other photographers were still using film and SLR cameras, Coady stacked the odds in his favor and invested in new digital gear as technology was constantly changing and new purchases were always imminent.

Their gamble paid off big as technology began to plateau and increased capabilities beyond imagination.

In an interview with NDTfrom TD Thornton, Kurtis Coady explains technical capabilities to serve customers.

“Compared to other photographers, we are very data driven. So much so that everything we do is on a server outside of Phoenix that we built ourselves. It’s 120 terabytes. And every Coady computer across the country is synced to it.

“So if I’m in Keeneland and an owner walks into the office who just won a horse at Indiana Grand, no problem. I can print these pictures out in two minutes. I programmed our first six generations of sites Web with my dad and Shawn. On our current website we have 250,000 races available for sale. And some of those races have 30 photos posted.

Starting with a small family crew, Coady now has a crew of 50 photographers who shoot between 32 tracks when each has an open meet.

The Coady brothers at the 2015 Beeders’ Cup wearing their signature bow ties, left to right: Kevin, Shawn and Kurtis. Photo courtesy of the Coady family

Kurtis and Shawn oversee the large staff, who also share filming responsibilities. Kevin takes care of the accounting while Jack Jr. remains involved as the owner partner.

Coady became the official Oaklawn Park track photographer in 2003. As Oaklawn races became more nationally important and the horses they attracted got bigger and bigger , the photography industry has become more invigorated.

In 2016, Coady would be named the official track photographer for Churchill Downs and the Kentucky Derby, one of the highest honors for their company.

Team Coady would capture undefeated champion Nyquist, become the 142nd Kentucky Derby winner, and go on to photograph Triple Crown winner Justify.

Kurtis Coady would tell TDN that his most satisfying shot came in that Derby.

Justify sloshing to victory in the 2018 Kentucky Derby. Photo by Kurtis Coady

“The most important photo I’ve ever taken in my life was Justify [at the 2018 Derby] with the falling rain; the harshest lighting. And everyone on my team succeeded. It looked like it was broad daylight outside. It was beautiful. My shot, the shutter was perfect. I stopped the rain. The background with military personnel standing at attention. Everything in my picture was perfect.

Coady enjoys encouraging others to follow their legacy. Kurtis Coady said TD from TDN, Thornton when asked what advice he would give to aspiring race photographers: “I think the best advice I can give is to come shoot with us. Send me a note saying, “I just want to shoot for the weekend to learn how to get into this.” We’ll teach you the ins and outs. We like that. We are happy to help you. We want to be there for the horse racing photography community. And it’s the same for amateur photographers. If you can really show me that you’re dedicated and I feel it, I’ll put you on the track right next to me and we can tour together.

Coady also likes to give back. In 2016, they sponsored the first Coady International Amateur Horse Racing Photography Competition, judged by a panel of photojournalism experts.

Jeff Coady. Photo courtesy of the Coady family

Jack Sr. (2008) and Jeff (2013) are both deceased, but there is a race named in their honor, the Jeff and Jack Coady, Sr., Stakes, which will be held at Turf Paradise on Saturday November 5th. the second day of the meeting on the opening weekend.

While most of the Coady team will be in Keeneland covering the Breeders’ Cup, there will be a family representative in Turf Paradise to document this treasured event.

To view Coady Photography’s photography gallery, visit their website at https://coadyphotography.com.

Editor Sidebar: Coady Photography has a logo that I have admired for many years. A black fleur-de-lis with horse heads silhouetted as petals and a gold bow tie in the center. Graphic designer for many years, I appreciate the balance, the symmetry and the color of the logo. Until recently, I had never realized the symbolism of the bow tie, a nod to the fashion sense of the three brothers. If there was an Eclipse award for the design, this one would surely win.

For more information on Past The Wire’s annual Breeders’ Cup Seminar, Best of the Game CLICK HERE

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12 environmental photographers to follow in 2023 https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/12-environmental-photographers-to-follow-in-2023/ Fri, 28 Oct 2022 15:07:40 +0000 https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/12-environmental-photographers-to-follow-in-2023/ The GLF Climate 2022 photo competition, organized by the Global Landscapes Forum (GLF), has selected 36 environmental photographers as finalists. Their range of submitted images highlight both the impact of the climate crisis on landscapes around the world and how communities are building resilience and fighting for change. The winners will be announced on November […]]]>

The GLF Climate 2022 photo competition, organized by the Global Landscapes Forum (GLF), has selected 36 environmental photographers as finalists. Their range of submitted images highlight both the impact of the climate crisis on landscapes around the world and how communities are building resilience and fighting for change.

The winners will be announced on November 11 during GLF Climate 2022, alongside this year’s United Nations Climate Change Conference (COP27) in Sharm el-Sheikh, Egypt. Before that, however, we wanted to show off some of the amazing submissions that will be put before our photo judges.

Here are 12 environmental photographers, in alphabetical order, worth following for more inspiring, educational, and impactful images of our planet in motion.

The photographers’ quotes on their images have been edited for clarity and content.

1. Anthony Ochieng Onyango, Kenya

The Land of Hope. Anthony Ochieng Onyango, GLF Climate Photo Contest 2022

“An aerial view of a grass seed bank in Amboseli, Kenya. The grass seed bank is run by women in the community who supply the area with grass seed for restoration. It is evident that even during the dry season, the grass seed bank is able to withstand the pressures and continue to support the community. »

Follow the work of Anthony Ochieng Onyango, also known as Tony Wild, here.

2. Cecilia Delattre, France

Melting icebergs in the Jökulsarlon glacier lagoon, Iceland.
Last light. Cécilia Delattre, GLF Climate Photo Contest 2022

“This photo was taken in the Jökulsárlón glacier lagoon in Iceland. Melting icebergs break away from the nearby Vatnajökull glacier and end up here, where they are bound to slowly melt with the sun. Will there be more in the years to come?

Follow Cécilia Delattre’s work here.

3. Derrick Milimo, Kenya

Students from Kirangari Primary School plant strawberry seedlings in Kiambu County, Kenya.
Climate Warriors: Kirangari Primary School students plant strawberry seedlings in Kiambu County, Kenya. Derrick Milimo, GLF Climate Photo Contest 2022

“’We’re correcting the ground now for the next generation,’ says Michael Waiyaki. Miti Alliance’s Michael Waiyaki and Joan Njoki have teamed up with other like-minded people to slow the devastating effects of climate change from deforestation by growing trees and transferring their knowledge to the next generation of environmentalists.

Follow Derrick Milimo’s work here.

4. Dikye Ariani, Indonesia

A kingfisher catches a fish in a river.
Bird and water. Dikye Ariani, GLF Climate Photo Contest 2022

“The kingfisher usually hunts fish in the river. This bird can dive into the river to catch fish.

Follow Dikye Ariani’s work here.

5. Esteban Biba, Guatemala

A woman holds a wooden cross while praying for lava from the Pacaya volcano.
Pray. Esteban Biba, GLF Climate Photo Contest 2022

“A woman holds a wooden cross praying that the lava from the Pacaya volcano does not reach her population. For seven weeks, a group of people from the village of El Rodeo went to the volcano to pray as the lava was advancing rapidly towards the houses. The lava stopped a few meters from the first dwelling.

Follow Esteban Biba’s work here.

6. Jenny Zhao, USA

A young polar bear cub climbs on plastic in Hudson's Bay, Canada.
Plastic is everywhere. Jenny Zhao, GLF Climate Photo Contest 2022

“We photographed this young polar bear cub with its mother in October 2021 in Hudson’s Bay, Canada, as the bears were on their migration route waiting for the sea ice to freeze over.”

Follow Jenny Zhao’s work here.

7. Pretty Luo, China

A forest fire is burning in Chongqing, a city in southwest China.
Forest fire in the city. Jolie Luo, GLF Climate Photo Contest 2022

“Chongqing, a city in southwest China, battled wildfires caused by extreme heat waves in August 2022. The fires were scattered across forests in Jiangjin, Dazu, Tongliang and Banan counties of the municipality. . According to the local water resources bureau, 51 rivers in the city have stopped flowing and 24 reservoirs have dried up. With the scorching heat and lack of rainfall, Chongqing issued a red alert, the highest alert level, for wildfires in most districts and counties from Aug. 16 to 23. Faced with the raging flames, people from all walks of life voluntarily mobilized to put out the flames together, showing extraordinary heroism.

Follow Jolie Luo’s work here.

8. Marcio Esteves Cabral, Brazil

12 environmental photographers to follow in 2023
Mirage. Marcio Esteves Cabral, GLF Climate Photo Contest 2022

“This image was taken with a drone at sunset, with views of the lagoons formed by rainwater and the mouth of the Preguiças River in the background.”

Follow the work of Marcio Esteves Cabral here.

9. Mouneb Taim, Syria

12 environmental photographers to follow in 2023
Influence of climate in times of war. Mouneb Taim, GLF Climate Photo Contest 2022

“The war has greatly affected the climate in Syria Destruction. Camps, diseases, displacements and others are the factors. The photo shows people living in camps in winter, with difficult livelihoods due to climate change.

Follow Mouneb Taim’s work here.

10. Muhammad Amdad Hossain, Bangladesh

Fishermen are seen floating above seaweed as they search for a potential catch in the bright green waters of a river.
Cross the seaweed river. Muhammad Amdad Hossain, GLF Climate Photo Contest 2022

“Fishermen are seen floating above seaweed as they search for a potential catch in the bright green waters of a river. The Sirajganj spot in Bangladesh is a popular spot for swimming and bathing, even in the cold water Algae make the water cloudy and climate change causes pollution and the drying up of the river.

Follow the work of Muhammad Amdad Hossain here.

11. Nicholas Shawn Mugarura, Uganda

Gumisiriza Narasi, 62, a security guard and urban farmer, looks sadly up close at the withered passion fruit vines in her garden in Ntinda, Kampala, Uganda
In my withered garden. Nicholas Shawn Mugarura, GLF Climate Photo Contest 2022

62-year-old security guard and urban farmer Gumisiriza Narasi sadly looks closely at the withered passion fruit vines in her garden in Ntinda, Kampala, Uganda on July 28, 2022. “Life is hard, I look at all my passion fruits to dry. It was a huge supplement to my income,” says Narasi. Uganda experienced a prolonged dry spell after the rains which were expected to start in March or April and last until May or June were not enough, with Kampala recording up to nearly 38 degrees Celsius.

Follow the work of Nicholas Shawn Mugarura here.

12. Sharad Iragonda Patil, India

Air pollution mixed with fog rolling over a green landscape.
Air pollution and climate change. Sharad Iragonda Patil, GLF Climate Photo Contest 2022

“Although this photo is beautiful, it can be seen that air pollution will affect nature in the future. Air pollution caused by dust from factories is dangerous in the misty nature in the morning.

Follow Sharad Iragonda Patil’s work here.

The Photo Jury: four more to follow

These 12 environmental photographers are just a few of those shortlisted for the GLF Climate 2022 Photo Contest, which will be presented to a panel of judges bringing together expertise from around the world. Here are the photographers and storytellers making up the jury, whom we also advise you to follow.

Gab Mejia, documentary conservation photographer

The first of our judges is Gab Mejia, a Filipino conservation photographer, environmental storyteller and engineer. Her work focuses on the climate crisis, endangered wildlife, and the intersectionality of culture and environment.

You can see Gab Mejia’s work by following his Instagram here.

Viviane Ponti, commercial photographer

Next up is Viviane, a commercial photographer based in Toronto, Canada. She is an active photographer for Lonely Planet Images, holds a travel portfolio represented by Getty Images, and is a lifelong contributor to Airbnb. His work has been published in international media such as BBC London, BBC trip, Lonely Planet Travel Guides and The New York Timesto name a few.

You can see more of Viviane’s varied work on her website.

Sydelle Willow Smith, storyteller and impact campaign strategist

Our third judge is Sydelle Willow Smith, a Cape Town-based storyteller and impact campaign strategist who works across Africa. His areas of intervention include memory, identity, migration and whiteness. She has collaborated with publications such as The New York Times, UC Observer (Canada), The world, 1843 magazine for The Economist, National Geographic Traveler, among others. She also co-founded Africa’s first solar-powered cinema network, Sunshine Cinema.

Follow Sydelle Willow Smith on Instagram and Twitter to see his storytelling work.

Miora Rajaonary, Freelance Photographer and National Geographic Explorer

Our fourth and final judge is Miora Rajaonary, a documentary photographer born and raised in Madagascar and currently based in Mauritius. In her work, she explores cultural and environmental issues in contemporary Africa and for the past two years has focused on food security and related local initiatives.

Miora is a National Geographic Explorer and the winner of The Fence 2019 photography competition. She also won the top prize at Addis Foto Fest’s Portfolio Review in December 2018 and was one of four winners of the inaugural Getty Fellowship. + Array in July. 2018.

You can stay up to date with Miora Rajaonary’s work on Instagram.

This panel of judges will select the first and second place winners, but you can also get involved by voting for your favorite photo to be nominated for the ‘popular vote’ prize. Take a look at the 36 finalists here and choose the photo you want to win.

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Jamie Ferguson’s Harris Tweed Collaboration Creates Fall’s Coolest Jackets – Robb Report https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/jamie-fergusons-harris-tweed-collaboration-creates-falls-coolest-jackets-robb-report/ Tue, 25 Oct 2022 15:32:44 +0000 https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/jamie-fergusons-harris-tweed-collaboration-creates-falls-coolest-jackets-robb-report/ As an in-demand menswear photographer, Jamie Ferguson is used to photographing clothes, not designing them. But Ferguson – who is perhaps better known by his Instagram name, JKF Man – crossed over to the other side of the lens to design a Harris Tweed that was adapted into a sports jacket by the Anthology and […]]]>

As an in-demand menswear photographer, Jamie Ferguson is used to photographing clothes, not designing them. But Ferguson – who is perhaps better known by his Instagram name, JKF Man – crossed over to the other side of the lens to design a Harris Tweed that was adapted into a sports jacket by the Anthology and is at the base of an upcoming No Man Walks Alone chore coat.

The project is a kind of homecoming for Ferguson, who at 15 left Canada for the small Scottish village where his mother grew up. During the summer holidays, Ferguson would take road trips through the Scottish Highlands and soak up its visual splendor.

“You would often see these amazing colors in the rugged countryside: purples, reds, oranges, blacks and yellows,” he says. Robb report. So when Ferguson had the opportunity to co-design fabric with Harris Tweed Hebrides in 2021, he only had to look to those memories for inspiration.

“When I started my career in menswear, I quickly fell in love with jackets made from Harris Tweed because of their raw, ready feel and look,” he continues. “I have always sought to combine the colors I saw growing up traveling with this amazing fabric and this collaboration gave me that chance.”

Ferguson based the new tweed on unsold houndstooth fabric from the Harris Tweed archives.

Jamie Ferguson

Ferguson first asked to see any unsold houndstooth fabrics the factory had on hand, as he wanted his Harris Tweed to have a vintage feel. After finding a near-ideal fabric, Ferguson requested that only two of his colors be swapped out until he had a pattern in Highland-esque shades of beige, caramel brown, navy blue, soft blue and raspberry pink.

Once the design was determined, 100 yards of fabric were made to the exacting standards set by the Harris Tweed Authority, which specifies that it must be handwoven by residents of Scotland’s Outer Hebrides working from home. Ferguson’s fabric was finished at a weight of 470/500g, or what the rugged factory classifies as ‘featherweight’.

Subsequently, 20 meters were wholesaled to Parisian fashion brand LSD, which plans to sell them to customers as cut lengths for tailoring; An additional 20 yards have been supplied to online-only retailer No Man Walks Alone, which is using it to produce a three-patch-pocket chore jacket set to launch in November; and the remaining 60 meters were reserved for Hong Kong and Taipei-based classic menswear brand The Anthology, which had supported the project since its inception.

Menswear writer Manish Puri wearing the new JKF Man Harris Tweed jacket from The Anthology.

Menswear writer Manish Puri wearing the new JKF Man Harris Tweed jacket from The Anthology.

Jamie Ferguson

In his hands, Ferguson’s fabric became a sports jacket tailored in the style of the Anthology house. The jacket, which is now available online and retails for $1,180, is marked by patch pockets, a 3/2 roll and a slightly elongated, subtly rope-constructed shoulder with no padding.

Anthology co-founder Buzz Tang said he and Ferguson originally considered using Harris Tweed to make a traditional British shooting jacket or field coat. But the duo decided that matching the campaign’s dense fabric with the brand’s “neo-classical” aesthetic would make it more suited to contemporary attire.

“Let the heritage fabric and modern silhouette create their chemistry,” Tang says of the jumpsuit.

After dipping his toes into the design, Ferguson returned to the camera. In early October, he traveled to the Scottish Highlands and Outer Hebrides with Tang and menswear writer Manish Puri (who in this case served as a model) to shoot a campaign around the Anthology jacket, wrapping up the project loop.

If there’s a lesson to be learned from Ferguson’s project, it’s that you can go home and share a little with the rest of the world too.

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