Artist – David Hemmings Bird Photography http://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/ Wed, 23 Nov 2022 07:32:26 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-2021-06-25T155134.587.png Artist – David Hemmings Bird Photography http://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/ 32 32 Artists’ Tree Exhibit and Holiday Artists’ Market scheduled for November 26 | News, Sports, Jobs https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/artists-tree-exhibit-and-holiday-artists-market-scheduled-for-november-26-news-sports-jobs/ Wed, 23 Nov 2022 07:15:37 +0000 https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/artists-tree-exhibit-and-holiday-artists-market-scheduled-for-november-26-news-sports-jobs/ The Parkersburg Art Center will be open Saturday, November 26 from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. for the opening of the Artist Tree exhibit and the Holiday Artist Market. (Photo provided) PARKERSBURG — The Parkersburg Art Center will open on Saturday, November 26 from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. for the […]]]>

The Parkersburg Art Center will be open Saturday, November 26 from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. for the opening of the Artist Tree exhibit and the Holiday Artist Market. (Photo provided)

PARKERSBURG — The Parkersburg Art Center will open on Saturday, November 26 from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. for the opening of the Artist Tree exhibit and the Holiday Artist Market.

There will be free admission, take-out snacks and a craft project for the kids.

For the annual Artist Tree exhibit, local artists and school groups come together to imagine what this classic holiday setting would have looked like in the hands of famous and less famous artists.

This is a community celebration of art and creativity that will feature 18 trees with unusual designs and decorations this year. Visitors can contribute a few dollars and vote for their favorite trees, with proceeds helping the Art Center purchase supplies for art classes.

“Kids in kindergarten are so excited about opening on Saturday,” said Jess Carpenter, kindergarten teacher at Criss Elementary. “They told me it was going to be ‘the best day of my life’.”

“First Settlement Physical Therapy is proud to support the Art Center – the best center in the state. Events like the Artist Tree exhibit are proof of that,” said FSPT owner Simon Hargus. “We hope the whole town comes out to experience this unique holiday tradition.”

In addition to the festive decor, there will also be an abundance of original arts and crafts for sale at the PAC 713 Market and the annual Artists’ Market. Candles, purses, jewelry, cards, paintings, decorative boxes, pottery, macrame, stained glass, fused glass, stuffed animals, hats, wood crafts, books and more are featured.

“It’s so fun to see what people in our area are doing. This is just one of the ways the Art Center can support local artists in our community. We keep the gift shop full of gift items and original artwork, so if you can’t come this weekend, please stop by and shop with us later. Shop small. Buy local, said Anna Farson, reception and events manager for the art center.

The art center is located at the corner of Eighth and Market streets in downtown Parkersburg. Regular hours are Tuesday through Saturday from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. To learn more about events at the Art Center, visit their Facebook page or their website http://www.parkersburgartcenter.org/




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Local hip-hop artist reflects on Young Dolph’s death https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/local-hip-hop-artist-reflects-on-young-dolphs-death/ Thu, 17 Nov 2022 22:58:00 +0000 https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/local-hip-hop-artist-reflects-on-young-dolphs-death/ MEMPHIS, Tenn. (WMC) – A local hip-hop artist reflects on Young Dolph’s legacy a year after his tragic death. Memphis’ music scene has always had a major impact on the rest of the country. Memphis has several well-known big names that have transformed the music industry, including Elvis, Johnny Cash, and BB King. Memphis hip-hop […]]]>

MEMPHIS, Tenn. (WMC) – A local hip-hop artist reflects on Young Dolph’s legacy a year after his tragic death.

Memphis’ music scene has always had a major impact on the rest of the country.

Memphis has several well-known big names that have transformed the music industry, including Elvis, Johnny Cash, and BB King.

Memphis hip-hop makes its own mark, and Young Dolph was one of them.

“He was a really cool, laid back guy,” Louis Cole said. Cole has been in the music business for 24 years.

He spends most of his time away from One Sound Studio, the South Memphis recording studio he owns.

Cole is also a sound engineer. He met Young Dolph inside and outside the studio.

Cole says Young Dolph was kind and genuine.

“I desperately remember so many of them being on his level, having such an attitude or you know, or feeling on top of everyone when they’re in the room. No, not Dolph,” Cole said.

That’s part of the reason the young rapper’s death still hurts a year later.

“It was heavy,” he said. I was in the studio recording at the time, and I promise you… everything froze.

For a time, Memphis rap too.

Cole says many stopped collaborating on music often out of fear of who they could trust after Dolph’s murder.

Cole says over time there has been a change since then.

“People [are] let people in now,” he said. “It’s like, ‘you do this’ oh ok, kidding with you, rocking with you…let’s do something,” Cole said. “Memphis is really coming together now, I mean really coming together in a big way, and that’s why you see so many talented artists starting to get along now.”

From artists like Big Boogie and Grammy-nominated GloRilla, Cole says he loves where Memphis rap music is heading, he’s just heartbroken that Young Dolph isn’t around to see it.

“It’s exciting when, you know, people are going to see them on stage with these great artists making these big feature films…and the crazy part about it, they send it back to us here,” he said. declared.

Cole said the Memphis rap scene has become like a family, and he hopes people will continue to honor Dolph’s life through collaboration and support.

“He’s in a better place,” he said. “He changed Memphis music forever.”

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A treasure trove of drawings by Edie Sedgwick, the artist and famous muse of Andy Warhol, is going to be auctioned https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/a-treasure-trove-of-drawings-by-edie-sedgwick-the-artist-and-famous-muse-of-andy-warhol-is-going-to-be-auctioned/ Mon, 14 Nov 2022 22:53:56 +0000 https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/a-treasure-trove-of-drawings-by-edie-sedgwick-the-artist-and-famous-muse-of-andy-warhol-is-going-to-be-auctioned/ The original Chelsea Girl returns to her old stomping ground tonight. A work by the late actress and model Edie Sedgwick is being shown for the first time at the Chelsea Hotel, ahead of the November 17 sale of drawings by the friend and muse of Andy Warhol. RR’s “Marvels of Modern Music” auction features […]]]>

The original Chelsea Girl returns to her old stomping ground tonight. A work by the late actress and model Edie Sedgwick is being shown for the first time at the Chelsea Hotel, ahead of the November 17 sale of drawings by the friend and muse of Andy Warhol.

RR’s “Marvels of Modern Music” auction features autographs, memorabilia and original artwork from Bob Dylan, Billy Joel and, of course, Sedgwick herself.

Edith Minturn Sedgwick was born into a family of surprisingly robust art history. Her father, Francis Minturn Sedgwick, was a rancher and sculptor, and Edie was named after her great aunt Edith Minturn Stokes, who was the subject of a portrait by John Singer Sargent, now on display at the Metropolitan Museum. Her first cousin was artist Lily Saarinen, who was married to sculptor Eero Saarinen until 1954. A treasure trove of letters between Alice de Forest Sedgwick and Lily about Edie’s progress in her art lessons is part of the sale at auction, for an estimate of around $500.

The Sedgwick family was not happy, and Edie developed an eating disorder at a young age. She was sent to several boarding schools, but was eventually pulled out due to deteriorating health. She was committed to Silver Hill Psychiatric Hospital in Connecticut in 1962.

Model sketch of original horses by Edie Sedgwick (1960). Courtesy of RR Auctions.

While confined to her father’s ranch between school and hospital stints, Edie developed a talent for drawing, capturing her beloved horses in charcoal and dreaming of escaping on horseback. of his unfortunate situation.

Sedgwick’s brother, Johnathan, noted in the lot description for his sister’s sketches that “she couldn’t leave the ranch. She was locked up. Usually it started with a battle with my father. She always felt he would come for her. So she would disappear into the mountains with her horse, Chub… then she would come back, appeased.

Original self-portrait painting by Edie Sedgwick (1965). Courtesy of RR Auctions.

Other works for sale include studies of the female form and self-portraits by Sedgwick. In an original self-portrait from 1965, the year Edie met Andy Warhol, the artist portrays herself as the petite blonde with blond hair who captivated 1960s culture. Her cheekbones are outlined in white and she poses nude with a roll of fabric wrapped seductively around her shoulders and waist. It is estimated to sell for up to $40,000.

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Sarah Biffin, the famous Victorian miniaturist born without hands, is now getting her first big show in 100 years

Disgraced antiques dealer Subhash Kapoor has been sentenced to 10 years in prison by an Indian court

It took eight years, an army of engineers and 1,600 pounds of chains to bring artist Charles Gaines’ deep meditation on America to life. Now it’s here

“I will have great shows posthumously,” said Hedda Sterne. She was right – and now the late artist is getting the recognition she deserved

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Damoi Morgan ’25 adds melody to campus with a steel drum – The Lafayette https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/damoi-morgan-25-adds-melody-to-campus-with-a-steel-drum-the-lafayette/ Fri, 11 Nov 2022 09:07:51 +0000 https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/damoi-morgan-25-adds-melody-to-campus-with-a-steel-drum-the-lafayette/ You may never have met Damoi Morgan ’25, but chances are you’ve heard his music come through the Quad. For many Lafayette students and faculty members, the melodies of Morgan’s steel drums echoing around campus have become a familiar and welcoming sound. Morgan’s penchant for the steel drum first emerged when he was in high […]]]>

You may never have met Damoi Morgan ’25, but chances are you’ve heard his music come through the Quad. For many Lafayette students and faculty members, the melodies of Morgan’s steel drums echoing around campus have become a familiar and welcoming sound.

Morgan’s penchant for the steel drum first emerged when he was in high school. Originally trained as a percussionist, he began experimenting with the steel drum as a way to expand his musical horizons beyond rhythms and patterns and into the world of notes and tones.

“I got into steelpan because I was able to be a musician and learn music theory…and still hit some stuff,” he said.

Now in Lafayette, Morgan’s affinity for “hitting stuff” has blossomed into an affinity for a multitude of musical endeavors; he runs his own production company, starts a new club, hosts his own version of NPR’s Tiny Desk Concert, and on top of it all, always finds time to perform recreationally.

Morgan is best known in Lafayette for his consistent performance in quad biking and, from his perspective, that’s exactly the kind of activity that truly defines Lafayette.

“Without students on campus, this land is just black and white…People being on campus, especially with musical instruments, it…adds another layer of color to the scene,” said Morgan.

Seeing more of this color come to campus is hugely important to Morgan. He founded a new club called Jam Session to help do just that.

“There are a lot of people here who like to create music, but they don’t like to do it on stage. So I’m going to start a club that’s more about…putting people in different spaces on campus and recording their creations…because everybody loves creating music,” he said.

Jam Session will act alongside Lafayette Interdisciplinary Music Society (LIMS), an on-campus music organization that focuses on live performance, to help student artists share and produce their music in a professional, well-executed, and accessible way.

Since beginning his journey with the steel drum, Morgan has grown not only as a performer and leader, but also as a businessman. He is currently planning to double major in music and economics, and he runs his own production company, Exquisite Productions.

“I created Exquisite Productions because that’s how I chose to describe myself and how my music is performed,” Morgan said. “If I’m involved in production, you receive exquisite production.”

Over the past summer, Morgan and her company have hosted 100th anniversary celebrations, cocktail parties and parties, cementing her success by becoming an officially registered company.

“I will definitely be playing music forever,” Morgan said. “There is no reason to stop.”

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Lois Curtis, artist and disability rights advocate, dies at 55 https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/lois-curtis-artist-and-disability-rights-advocate-dies-at-55/ Wed, 09 Nov 2022 02:09:52 +0000 https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/lois-curtis-artist-and-disability-rights-advocate-dies-at-55/ Confined to hospitals and psychiatric institutions against her will, Lois Curtis regularly called for help, dialing the number of a compassionate lawyer who distributed her business card to social workers and people with disabilities. “When can I get out of here?” she would ask. “Would you please get me out of here?” Ms Curtis had […]]]>

Confined to hospitals and psychiatric institutions against her will, Lois Curtis regularly called for help, dialing the number of a compassionate lawyer who distributed her business card to social workers and people with disabilities. “When can I get out of here?” she would ask. “Would you please get me out of here?”

Ms Curtis had been diagnosed with schizophrenia and developmental disabilities as a young woman and by her late twenties had spent more than half her life in public institutions. Isolated and angry, she chain-smoked to pass the time and prayed to God at night, asking to be rescued from Georgia Regional Hospital in Atlanta.

Her fight to get home led her to Sue Jamieson, an Atlanta Legal Aid lawyer who filed the lawsuit on behalf of Ms Curtis and one of Ms Curtis’ friends, Elaine Wilson. The case made its way to the Supreme Court, where in 1999 the justices handed down a landmark decision that gave people with disabilities the right to receive care and support services in their own homes and communities, and not only in public institutions.

The case was called Olmstead v. LC— Ms Curtis was the ‘LC’ – and galvanized the disability rights movement, providing a legal framework for people with disabilities to secure the right to live, work and study in their own communities. Some lawyers have described it as the movement of Brown v. Board of Educationcomparing it to the 1954 Supreme Court decision that outlawed racial segregation in public schools.

“He created and enshrined a right to live and participate fully in his own community. It really is the centerpiece of what disability law is all about,” said Alison Barkoff, senior federal official responsible for aging and disability policy. The Olmstead decision “has led to a radical change in the appearance of public service systems”, she added in a telephone interview, noting that while most public services for people with disabilities were previously provided in institutions, “the vast majority of services” are now “provided to people in their own homes and in their own communities.

The court case also marked the start of a joyful new era for Ms Curtis, who moved into her own home as the trial progressed through the legal system. Aided by a dedicated network of friends and caregivers, she lived independently while pursuing her calling as an artist, using pastels, acrylics, markers and crayons to draw images of people and animals that were sold at auction and exhibited in galleries.

“My art has been around for a long time,” she once told Jamieson, explaining what drawing meant to her. “I came when my art arrived. Drawing pretty pictures is a way to meet God in the world as he is.

Ms Curtis was 55 when she died on November 3 At her place in Clarkston, Ga. The cause was pancreatic cancer, said her friend Lee Sanders, who helped Ms. Curtis find work and sell some of her paintings.

Through her legal advocacy and her appearances at disability rights conferences, Ms. Curtis has become a nationally recognized personality, widely admired for her relentless optimism and tenacity. “Lois demanded dignity when every system and politics in her life told her she didn’t deserve it,” said Maria Town, president and CEO of the Americans with Disabilities Association.

Mrs. Curtis was 27 when the Olmstead A lawsuit was filed in 1995, challenging the decision of Tommy Olmstead, the commissioner of the Georgia Department of Human Resources, to keep Ms. Curtis in mental isolation. (Wilson, the co-plaintiff, was added to the case later.) Hospital staff had determined she could live in a community living facility with supportive care, but she was stuck on a waiting list, with state officials saying they didn’t have enough resources to get her out of a facility.

The Supreme Court ultimately sided with Ms Curtis, ruling 6 to 3 that the unwarranted segregation of people with disabilities constituted discrimination under the Americans With Disabilities Act of 1990. People with intellectual disabilities had the right to receive community care, the court heard. , as long as they were medically cleared to do so, had expressed a desire to return to their communities and could be “reasonably accommodated” by the state.

The court’s majority opinion, written by Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, noted that institutional confinement “significantly diminishes individuals’ activities of daily living, including family relationships, social contacts, work options, economic independence, educational advancement and cultural enrichment”.

Over the next two decades, other court cases extended the scope of the Olmstead decision, which applied not only to psychiatric hospitals, but also to nursing homes and other institutions receiving state and federal funding. Advocates used the decision to fight for the right of people with disabilities to learn in the same classroom as other students and to work in the same workplace as other employees.

Yet advocates say many people with disabilities still struggle to get the rights and services Ms Curtis fought for. According to Barkoff, acting head of the Community Life Administration at the Department of Health and Human Services, “an estimated 800,000 seniors and people with disabilities are on waiting lists for community services,” many of whom are at risk. to be institutionalized.

Ms. Curtis had a message for those trying, as she once did, to return to their communities. “I remember you,” she wrote in a short 2010 letter shared by her friend Sanders. “Give me a prayer. Sometimes I feel good about my life. When I feel down in my life, I name my country, sing the gospel, and bring my spirit home.

“I will sing with you again.

Lois Jeanette Curtis was born in Atlanta on July 14, 1967. She never knew her father, a truck driver, and was raised by her mother, a housekeeper who struggled with alcoholism, according to a 2000 article. of the Atlanta Constitution. Ms Curtis often wandered away from home as a child, leading her mother to call 911 to help find her eldest daughter. When she was located, she was often sent to public institutions.

After being released and starting to live in an apartment as an adult, she traveled to Washington with her lawyers, climbing the steps of the Supreme Court to follow the progress of her case.

“Lawyers were focused on the frightening possibility that the Court would reverse successful lower court decisions and the exciting possibility that it might not,” Jamieson recalled in a blog post for the White House website. Barack Obama. “Lois, however, tends to take things head on and understands the joy of the moment. Since she wasn’t in a state hospital but was enjoying a trip to DC with her friends and followers, she focused on this day of freedom and adventure.

Ms. Curtis hoped she could see the president himself. She had to wait 12 years, but in 2011 she visited Barack Obama at the White House and presented him with one of her self-portraits, a drawing called “Girl in Orange Dress”.

“She created works of art as she lived,” her friend Sanders wrote in a tribute on Facebook, praising “her unabashedly drawn lines, bold, saturated colors, simple, spirited imagery.”

Ms Curtis’ co-applicant Wilson died in 2004 aged 53. Survivors include two sisters.

In a 2014 interview for Impact, a University of Minnesota magazine on disability issues, Ms Curtis described some of the daily routines and delights of her life at home, including making breakfast, taking classes art, draw pictures and go to church.

“I raise my voice high! she says. “In the summer, I go to the swimming pool and I put my feet in the water. Maybe I’ll learn to swim one day. I have sinned. I saw a pig and a horse on a farm. I buy clothes and shoes. I have birthday parties. They have a lot of fun. I am no longer afraid of big dogs.

“I feel good about myself,” she continued, thinking back to the decades she’d spent in institutions. “My life a better life.”

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Instagram’s TikTokification is hurting artists https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/instagrams-tiktokification-is-hurting-artists/ Sun, 06 Nov 2022 14:00:53 +0000 https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/instagrams-tiktokification-is-hurting-artists/ San Diego provides an arts scene for painters, poets, activists, comedians, sculptors and photographers not only through the many art institutions, galleries and learning spaces scattered throughout each neighborhood, but also through the City of San Diego’s efforts to finance art. Home to the San Diego Museum of Art, Spanish Village Art Center, North Park […]]]>

San Diego provides an arts scene for painters, poets, activists, comedians, sculptors and photographers not only through the many art institutions, galleries and learning spaces scattered throughout each neighborhood, but also through the City of San Diego’s efforts to finance art. Home to the San Diego Museum of Art, Spanish Village Art Center, North Park Murals, Museum of Photographic Arts, The Old Globe, Bread & Salt Gallery, La Jolla Playhouse and many more art venues, San Diego has positioned itself as a central place in the art world. Many universities prepare graduate students for Southern California’s thriving arts employment sectors, positioning them as innovators, free thinkers, and mavericks…and also social media marketers?

Is an Instagram following what it takes to be an artist in modern America?

Artists rely on social media to be discovered by potential buyers and investors, but the relationship between maker and buyer evolves in sync with changes to the platform through which they interact. Not only do developments on Instagram harm an artist’s ability to market themselves, they also negatively impact an artist’s ability to express themselves.

Joshua Mannila (@joshuamannila), a 19-year-old photographer based in Oregon and Los Angeles, said Instagram’s shift in focus to video seems unfair to photographers and creators who produce content based on the photo and depend on it for their income. He noticed his engagement had dropped and said he had been stuck for months, even losing followers.

Mannila said Instagram started with photos and then introduced Stories like Snapchat and Livestream like Musical.ly. Now Reels like TikTok.

“They lose their own identity as a social media platform,” Mannila said.

The art that kills slowly

As artists attempt to navigate this evolving tool, the line between being an artist and being a business executive is rapidly deteriorating.

“I really stay away from orienting my art and design towards what’s trending because I believe that (as artists) we’re the ones who are able to set that next trend,” said Kyle LeBlanc (@leblanc_co), 26-year-old contemporary artist based in San Diego.

LeBlanc has been a full-time artist for two years. He said Instagram is where people find out about him and where he makes around 90% of his sales. LeBlanc has adapted to Instagram’s changes by creating reels that capture her artistic process and often display her paintings from start to finish. For LeBlanc, the videos help him tell a story about the kind of artist he is.

“Having an entrepreneurial spirit is going to make art less personal, and it’s going to slowly kill the art,” LeBlanc said.

“I’m a bit cynical about what I think the future of art is going to be,” said Spencer Little (@spencerlittleart), a 46-year-old San Diego-based sculptural artist best known for his metal sculptures. wire which it integrates. in streetscapes. Little is represented by a gallery that exhibits internationally, but he primarily exhibits in galleries in Los Angeles. After being adamantly against smartphones and social media, Little bought his first smartphone and joined Instagram in 2015. Little said he was lucky to have established real-life customers who regularly collect from him and d have opportunities to work with museums and institutions to build facilities.

Since her career began before the rise of social media, Little has seemingly escaped the pressure of building an online following. Yet, due to COVID-19 and the lack of gallery exhibitions, he now primarily sells his work through Instagram.

Little has noticed that viewers interact differently with his pieces when presented online rather than in a gallery.

“If you can’t captivate someone in a millisecond, they’ll move on,” Little said.

When artists look at the analytics of their posts, it’s easy to see what’s being liked. This information, while perhaps helpful to sales, is not, according to Little, true art. In a perfect world, expression and profit would go hand in hand without one affecting the other. But it’s not a perfect world and artists need to promote themselves the same way Instagram tries to make money: grab attention. This economic model threatens the art world, which relies on redefining what is popular.

Katrina Frye, founder and CEO of Lauretta Records, an independent music label based in Los Angeles, said social media has updated and evolved to become insatiable, a turning point she says happened when Instagram was purchased by Facebook (2012) and ads were introduced to the platform (2013).

“It was a sea change, with no going back, because all of a sudden every artist had become a business. You weren’t a person anymore; you were selling something. I think that really deprived a lot of artists from the joy of just sharing,” Frye said.

Frye previously founded and ran a business development company for artists and creatives called Mischief Managed. She ran Mischief Managed for five years, but continually found that artists were looking for full marketing support, a service she chose not to offer.

At Lauretta Records, Frye works with recording artists to create a sustainable business model. Frye said there are probably shortcuts in the industry, like chasing virality on Instagram and TikTok, but she doesn’t believe in them.

“I have yet to meet an artist who feels loved, supported, returned by social networks.” said Frie.

Although it comes with challenges, there is no denying the need to have an online presence. Artists can’t afford not to show their work, and now they have to prove themselves with hard evidence of their marketing skills. Frye said that many of the vendors and entrepreneurs she works with won’t even look at the artists she represents if they don’t meet the criteria for some amount of following or consistent publication. When industry gatekeepers tell artists they need to meet specific audience goals, artists have no choice but to tweak what they create to be more marketable.

“If anything, it makes everyone want to look more like themselves and it’s really scary. It’s not art,” Frye said.

Many artists with an online presence seek virality, but Frye says going viral is only a marker of success, not an end in itself.

Artists who become marketers in order to find an audience on an app that keeps users blindly hooked on profit are hurting the art world. Once an arena of self-expression and true creativity, the art world is slowly being channeled into the restrictions of social media and calibrated marketing.

“We’re all the clinical trial of the Meta universe and to me that’s dangerous,” Frye said.

According to a Harvard Business Review study, watching videos without interruption contributes to the likelihood of users continuing to watch additional videos and falling further down the scrolling rabbit hole. The success of this business model for social media companies is undeniable. With Meta paying Facebook users to create video content, Instagram’s transition to video comes as no surprise. Yet it is independent artists, without the means of a small business, who are struggling to keep up.

Johnston is a journalism and graphic design student at Point Loma Nazarene University. She is the editor of PLNU’s student newspaper, The Point, and contributes as an editor. Although Johnston covers a variety of beats, she enjoys reporting on and commenting on emerging technology as a way to connect current events with the experience of a younger generation.

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Westport Book Shop welcomes artist Julie Leff https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/westport-book-shop-welcomes-artist-julie-leff/ Thu, 03 Nov 2022 14:10:00 +0000 https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/westport-book-shop-welcomes-artist-julie-leff/ Westport, Connecticut — The Westport Book Shop is pleased to welcome artist Julie Leff as a guest exhibitor for the month of November at the Book Shop’s Drew Friedman Art Place. Julie exhibits four vibrant, photorealistic oil paintings with a floral motif. “I paint for myself – for my love of color and form – […]]]>

Westport, Connecticut The Westport Book Shop is pleased to welcome artist Julie Leff as a guest exhibitor for the month of November at the Book Shop’s Drew Friedman Art Place.

Julie exhibits four vibrant, photorealistic oil paintings with a floral motif. “I paint for myself – for my love of color and form – but in a way that invites others to experience the beauty I see in the world,” Julie said.

Julie studied art at Yale University and the Silvermine Guild of Artists. Her work has appeared in numerous solo and group exhibitions, most recently at Art/Place in Fairfield. Julie is a member of Westport’s artist collective, WestonArts and Art/Place.

Julie Leff’s works will be exhibited at the Librairie until November 30, 2022. All works exhibited are available for purchase. Notecard boxes containing twelve different images of Julie’s floral oil paintings are also available.

To see more of Julie’s work, visit her website: www.julieleff.com

Westport Book Shop, a nonprofit used bookstore, is downtown Westport’s only source for used and antique books, vintage vinyl records, CDs, DVDs and audiobooks. It is located at 23 Jesup Road, just across Jesup Green from Westport Library.

The bookstore’s “Drew Friedman Art Place” is an area of ​​the store dedicated to exhibiting works by community artists throughout the year, on a rotational basis. Miggs Burroughs, trustee of the Drew Friedman Community Arts Center and founding member of The Artists Collective of Westport, curates these exhibits, which change monthly.

The art exhibition is open to the public during the Library’s opening hours: Sundays and Mondays from 12 p.m. to 5 p.m. and Tuesday to Saturday from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.

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Reservoir Reaches Deal With Grammy Award-Winning Artist KayGee, Including Entire Catalog and Future Works https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/reservoir-reaches-deal-with-grammy-award-winning-artist-kaygee-including-entire-catalog-and-future-works/ Mon, 31 Oct 2022 15:04:52 +0000 https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/reservoir-reaches-deal-with-grammy-award-winning-artist-kaygee-including-entire-catalog-and-future-works/ Reservoir Media has signed a new publishing deal with artist, writer and producer Keir Lamont Gist, professionally known as KayGee, founding member of Grammy-winning hip-hop trio Naughty By Nature. The company says the deal includes the rights to KayGee’s entire catalog and future work. Reservoir’s deal with KayGee follows the company’s recent acquisition of the […]]]>

Reservoir Media has signed a new publishing deal with artist, writer and producer Keir Lamont Gist, professionally known as KayGee, founding member of Grammy-winning hip-hop trio Naughty By Nature.

The company says the deal includes the rights to KayGee’s entire catalog and future work.

Reservoir’s deal with KayGee follows the company’s recent acquisition of the catalog of legendary songwriter and recording artist Louis Prima from the Gia Maione Prima Foundation.

KayGee got their start by founding the hip-hop group New Style, which became the Grammy-winning trio Naughty By Nature.

The band performed at local talent shows until they were discovered and eventually signed to Tommy Boy Records, which Reservoir acquired in 2021.

KayGee wrote and produced many of the band’s classic tracks, including Ontario Provincial Police., the number 1 single sold in platinum Hooray hip hop” and feel me sink.

Ontario Provincial Police. was the lead single from Naughty By Nature’s 1991 self-titled album; the song peaked at number 6 on Billboard’s Hot 100 while also topping the Hot Rap Songs chart.

PPO, Hip Hop Hooray, and feel me sink, which was on the trio’s fourth album, The paradise of povertyeach earned nominations for the Grammy Award for Best Rap Performance by a Duo or Group in 1991, 1993, and 1995, respectively.

The paradise of poverty also won Best Rap Album in 1995.

Beyond her work with Naughty By Nature, KayGee has collaborated with 50 Cent, Notorious BIG, Mary J. Blige, Fat Joe, and Luther Vandross, among others.

Additionally, he produced the Grammy-winning single UNITY for Tommy Boy labelmate Queen Latifah.

In the 1990s, KayGee founded his own label, Divine Mill, representing artists such as Zhané, with their hit single Hi Mr DJ, the group Next, with their singles Too close and womenand Jaheim with his tracks Put that woman first and In case, all KayGee collabs.

He is also currently writing and producing new acts under his label Slugga Music. As part of this deal with KayGee, Reservoir will distribute Slugga Music’s masters.

“I look forward to continuing to build my catalog and creating more at Reservoir.”

KayGee

Commenting on the deal, KayGee said, “It’s a joy to be able to work with Faith Newman and the team at Reservoir. Faith is an industry veteran, and it’s great to have someone with her knowledge working on my catalog.

“I look forward to continuing to build my catalog and creating more at Reservoir.”

“KayGee has contributed to countless hits in the modern hip-hop and R&B landscape, and the team at Reservoir looks forward to supporting his legacy as we continue to release new music together.”

Faith Newman, Reservoir

Faith Newman, Reservoir’s Executive Vice President, A&R and Catalog Development, added, “I’ve known KayGee for years, and after cementing our partnership through Reservoir’s acquisition of Tommy Boy, I’m so proud to continue. to develop our relationship.

“KayGee has contributed to countless hits in the modern hip-hop and R&B landscape, and the team at Reservoir looks forward to supporting his legacy as we continue to release new music together.”The music industry around the world

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Step Up Gallery patrons enjoy conversation with artist Carole Belliveau – Los Alamos Reporter https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/step-up-gallery-patrons-enjoy-conversation-with-artist-carole-belliveau-los-alamos-reporter/ Fri, 28 Oct 2022 02:47:14 +0000 https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/step-up-gallery-patrons-enjoy-conversation-with-artist-carole-belliveau-los-alamos-reporter/ Artist Carol Belliveau explains her process during her Gallery Talk Saturday at Step Up Gallery. Photo by Diane Stoffel BY DIANE STOFFELAdministratorStep up gallery An artists’ reception last Saturday afternoon included a half-hour talk by artist Carole Belliveau, explaining her mixed media process and sharing highlights from her career. The current retrospective exhibition at Step […]]]>

Artist Carol Belliveau explains her process during her Gallery Talk Saturday at Step Up Gallery. Photo by Diane Stoffel

BY DIANE STOFFEL
Administrator
Step up gallery

An artists’ reception last Saturday afternoon included a half-hour talk by artist Carole Belliveau, explaining her mixed media process and sharing highlights from her career. The current retrospective exhibition at Step Up Gallery, “The Road Taken, a 45-year Journey” by Carole Belliveau, features her paintings of female figures adorned with gold and silver leaf.

A reception attendee said, “I found the retrospective exhibition captivating as it covers 45 years of the artist’s life. The art shows her artistic evolution as a creator to finally find her clear and authentic voice. Another viewer, Wendy, shared this: “Carole’s work is like poetry. She whispers painted stories woven from gold, earth, sky and the human form that speak volumes, yet are open to individual interpretation and reflection.

Karen, who attended Carole’s Gallery Talk and also purchased a painting, had this to say about the exhibition: “Saturday I attended the reception for Carole Belliveau’s beautiful exhibition in an exceptional gallery space. His brilliant paintings of figures against a magical background are masterfully executed and unique. His use of different materials in each painting contributes to the remarkable effects. Plus, this is your only chance to see the amazing, unique and nationally acclaimed dolls created early in her career. It was truly one of the most spectacular exhibits I have ever seen. I will come back again and again.

Belliveau shared his gratitude for exhibiting at Step Up Gallery. “It has been a wonderful experience to exhibit so much of my life’s work in the beautiful setting of Step Up Gallery. It’s a dream come true for any artist to have a retrospective exhibition, but having it in a gallery with floor-to-ceiling natural light with windows framing the gorgeous views of autumn in the mountains was a privilege. unexpected.

The last day of the exhibition is November 9 so mark your calendars. If you missed the reception, a Gallery Talk video is available at: https://youtu.be/ukslUrtlrEQ

The exquisite paintings in this exhibition can be viewed online and purchased with any credit card at: https://stepupgallerymarket.artspan.com

Step Up Gallery is open Monday to Thursday: 10 a.m. to 8 p.m.; Friday: 10 a.m. – 6 p.m. and Saturday: 10 a.m. – 5 p.m. Close on Sunday. For now, masking is welcome but not required. Step Up Gallery is located on the upper level of the Mesa Public Library at 2400 Central Ave., Los Alamos, NM 87544. Please visit the Step Up Gallery website for more information – https://stepupgallery.org.

Artist Carole Belliveau explains it to us

creative process.Reception attendees and old friends.

Former Step Up Gallery director Katy Korkos has a strong sense of quality.

The artist Belliveau talks about his beginnings in making dolls.

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Artists unfurled red banners from the Guggenheim rotunda in support of the Iranian women’s protest movement https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/artists-unfurled-red-banners-from-the-guggenheim-rotunda-in-support-of-the-iranian-womens-protest-movement/ Mon, 24 Oct 2022 23:29:52 +0000 https://davidhemmingsbirdphotography.com/artists-unfurled-red-banners-from-the-guggenheim-rotunda-in-support-of-the-iranian-womens-protest-movement/ An artist collective staged a protest at the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum over the weekend, dramatically unfurling a dozen blood-red banners from the top floor of the building’s famous rotunda to draw attention to the protests ongoing in Iran against its unpopular compulsory hijab law. “This tribute is a call to action in support of […]]]>

An artist collective staged a protest at the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum over the weekend, dramatically unfurling a dozen blood-red banners from the top floor of the building’s famous rotunda to draw attention to the protests ongoing in Iran against its unpopular compulsory hijab law.

“This tribute is a call to action in support of the current revolution in Iran, led by brave Iranian women risking their lives to stand up against oppression and overthrow a long-standing authoritarian regime,” the group said. the Collective of Anonymous Artists for Iran. A declaration.

On September 16, 22-year-old Mahsa Amini, known as Jina or Zhina, died in Iran in suspicious circumstances after being arrested by Tehran’s “morals police” for improperly wearing her headscarf. (Iranian women have been required to wear a hijab covering their hair in public since the 1979 Iranian revolution.)

According to eyewitness accounts, Amini died as a result of police brutality. Her death sparked widespread protests led by women across the country, followed by government action against internet access and mobile phone services. Authorities are believed to have killed at least 200 people so far.

The Artists’ Collective for Iran unfurled banners in the rotunda of the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum in New York in support of women-led protests in Iran. Photo courtesy of Anonymous Artists Collective for Iran.

The Guggenheim action was designed to raise awareness in the art world of the protest movement and its fight for women’s human rights and freedom.

“The Iranian people are daily subjected to horrific violence and brutality,” the collective said. “With restricted internet access and minimal Western media coverage, it’s time to see and hear them as they shed light on their fearless fight against a totalitarian system.”

The Artists' Collective for Iran unfurled banners in the rotunda of the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum in New York in support of women-led protests in Iran.  Photo courtesy of Anonymous Artists Collective for Iran.

The Artists’ Collective for Iran unfurled banners in the rotunda of the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum in New York in support of women-led protests in Iran. Photo courtesy of Anonymous Artists Collective for Iran.

Zan zendegui azadI! Woman, life, freedom! This Kurdish chant has become a rallying manifesto, shouted around the world in Kurdish, Persian, English and dozens of other languages,” the group added. “The movement started in Jina’s hometown and has since spread like wildfire across the country and beyond. This is now a global call for us to leapfrog towards gender equality and universal liberation.

The group’s demonstration is not the first time anonymous artists have made a dramatic statement in support of the Iranian protest movement. Earlier this month, an anonymous artist was believed to be responsible for coloring several public fountains in Tehran bright red. The Twitter account @1500tasvir said the Crimson Pools was a work of art with a Persian title that translates to “Tehran Flowing in Blood”.

A swimming pool dyed red outside the Artists' Forum at Honarmandan Park in Iran's capital Tehran, reportedly during an anonymous protest by artists in response to the death of Mahsa Amini in police custody.  Photo by AFP via Getty Images.

A swimming pool dyed red outside the Artists’ Forum at Honarmandan Park in Iran’s capital Tehran, reportedly during an anonymous protest by artists in response to the death of Mahsa Amini in police custody. Photo by AFP via Getty Images.

“Unfortunately, over the past 40 years, [Iran’s progressive movement hasn’t] been able to create political groups capable of standing up to the government”, Pamela Karimi, author of Alternative Iran: Contemporary Art and Critical Spatial Practicesay it Washington Post. “Because of this, art has become a tool in people’s hands to communicate their dissatisfaction with the system.”

Saturday’s action at the Guggenheim coincided with large-scale protests around the world in solidarity with Iranian women, including demonstrations in Los Angeles, Berlin and Washington, D.C.

The 12 banners displayed at the Guggenheim featured a black stenciled portrait of Amini accompanied by the slogan “Women, Life, Freedom” in original Kurdish.

“Mahsa will never be forgotten and the cruel injustice done to Iranian women can no longer be ignored,” said the Artists Collective for Iran Anonymous. “Their fight for freedom is our whole fight.”

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