4 Fall Photography Tips: Make Landscape Shooting Easy!

I am a self-taught photographer, and I started practicing landscape photography about ten years ago. I remember seeing some beautiful pictures that inspired me to go out with my camera, but I didn’t really know what I was doing. There wasn’t a huge amount of information on the internet back then, so I invested in photography books to help me improve in areas like framing and composition.

Besides reading books, I took out my camera to explore whenever I could. All free time was devoted to the practice and development of my craft. This is where I learned my most valuable lessons. Practicing with my camera not only taught me what a good photo looks like, but also taught me how to recognize a bad one.

These are the best cameras for landscape photography (opens in a new tab)

In some situations, I remember feeling overwhelmed. So, rather than overloading myself with information, I practiced one thing at a time. Landscapes are more challenging than they first appear, but they’re also incredibly rewarding and often make beautiful prints.

(Image credit: Amy Lathrope-Reid)

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4 Steps to Shooting Landscapes This Fall

(Image credit: Amy Lathrope-Reid)

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1. Choose the right lens

I tend to capture landscapes with a few lenses. If you want to condense the scene, you can try shooting with a 70-200mm (opens in a new tab) enlarged. For this image I took with my Canon EOS 5D Mark III (opens in a new tab) and a Canon EF 70-200mm f/2.8L USM (opens in a new tab), compressing the foreground and background to frame the houses across the field. At other times I will use the Canon EF 16-35mm f/4L IS USM (opens in a new tab) when I’m much closer to the main subject, which allows me to see the surroundings better.

Discover the best lenses for landscapes (opens in a new tab)

(Image credit: Amy Lathrope-Reid)

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2. Try to keep your composition simple

I use many different composition guides to help me get the best shots, but for this image I kept it simple. I used repeating leading lines on either side of the frame to draw the viewer into the center and then explore the other elements, such as tree lines and morning mist.

(Image credit: Amy Lathrope-Reid)

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3. Film after the rain

I knew visiting Snowdonia in Wales would mean a high chance of rain, and on this particular trip it rained a plot. But there was a silver lining: shooting on a rainy day, or even right after the rain, really brings out the fall colors.

(Image credit: Amy Lathrope-Reid)

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4. Shoot in RAW

I like to save as much information as possible in my landscape images, so I always shoot RAW files. This allows me to recover all the details in shadows and highlights. In this example, I was able to bring out more detail in the clouds and sky, especially since the foreground was much darker when shooting.

For more of Amy’s work, check out her Instagram account: @vitiligo_photographer (opens in a new tab)

here are the The best Canon EOS 5D Mark III deals (opens in a new tab)and we also have our guide for the best canon lenses (opens in a new tab). You might also want to check out What makes a great landscape photograph? (opens in a new tab)

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